Category: jmduuhss

Video: National Cupcake Championships 2013

first_imgBritish Baker’s exclusive video from the fifth National Cupcake Championships, held at Cake International, Birmingham.Martin Hargreaves, a pastry chef from Greenhalgh’s Craft Bakery was named National Cupcake Champion in the professional section, with his Lemon & Lime Meringue cupcake. His creation also won the Classic Cupcake of the Year category.Shalini Sriskandarasa claimed the National Cupcake Champion title in the home bakers’ competition with her Chocolate Box cupcake, containing seven variations of chocolate, which was also triumphant in the Classic Cupcake of the Year category.For the full story and list of winners, click here.Information on National Cupcake Week can be found here.National Cupcake Week is sponsored by Tesco, Secret Ingredients and BFP Wholesale.last_img read more

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Visions of war

first_imgAn old Palestinian couple, uneasily at home in a Jordanian refugee camp, bicker and complain to an interviewer. An unlikely picture of war emerges in the 10-minute video, one of personal moments. The old man says of the aftermath of one battle, “For 60 days, a stone was my pillow.”The video — rendered colorful and cartoonish with a technique called “rotoscoping” — is “Larvae Channel 2,” a 2009 production by young Egyptian artist Wael Shawky. It is one of a panoply of works — videos, photographs, animations, slide shows, games, and collages — in the latest exhibition at Harvard’s Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts: “The Image in Question: War – Media – Art,” on view through Dec. 23.In one curtained alcove, the sounds of machine guns rip in Peggy Ahwesh’s “She Puppet, USA 2001,” an exploration of femininity in the age of video war games.In “War Without Bodies 1991/1996,” a panel of nine photos by Allan Sekula, American civilians examine the nested barrels of an electronic mini-gun. In the center panel, a toddler reaches out with a happy squeal.“The leading image [of war] is not the documentary any more,” said Berlin-based artist Antje Ehmann, who co-curated the Carpenter show with her partner, author and filmmaker Harun Farocki. She moderated an Oct. 21 panel with some of the artists, part of an opening celebration of the show. (An extended version will travel to Germany next year, and to Canada in 2013.)Farocki agreed that artists today are finding new ways to capture the images of war. When the United States restaged a major Gulf War battle on video, he said, “The reign of the photographic and the cinematic images comes to an end.”Kota Ezawa chose to render war by starting with computer art, but then used an “appropriated staged photograph” to produce a seemingly old-fashioned collage, “Dead Troops Talk” (2007).“It’s going backwards,” said Ezawa, a digital drawing and animation artist who lately has turned more to paper and wood.There are cinematic images in the show, but they are strained through modernity, like Shawky’s old couple rendered as a cartoon. Or as in “Killed 2009,” a rapid-fire slide show of Depression-era images from the Library of Congress compiled by Los Angeles artist and filmmaker William E. Jones. Each image has a hole punched in the center — “killed” by a censor during a Farm Security Administration photo project.At the same time, Jones’ work is a poignant look at the places that the “killed” of World War II came from —dusty streets, factories, and farms.During the panel, Jones said he meant to evoke the violence of censorship, too. At the very least, Ehmann added, the images in “Killed” show that “war is present on very different levels.”Certainly, the Carpenter Center exhibit shows war stripped of any cinematic glory. In a two-minute narrated video, “Je vous salue, Sarajevo” (1993), Jean-Luc Godard uses segments from a single photographic image — shardlike fragments that heighten the horror of a soldier rearing back to kick civilians lying on a sidewalk. Two other riflemen look away.The voice-over is nonstandard, too. “Culture is the rule, and art is the exception,” Godard narrates. “Everybody speaks the rule: cigarette, computer, T-shirt, television, tourism, war. Nobody speaks the exception” — except, he said, great artists.Godard’s fractured single image personalizes war in a surprising way. So does Shawky’s bickering couple, whose animation-style figures, Farocki said, seem to “reintroduce the idea of listening closely.”War also gets personal in four large-scale photographs by American-born artist and author Fazal Sheikh, taken from his 1997 book, “The Victor Weeps.” In each picture, a rough hand holds a single photograph of someone killed during fighting in Afghanistan. One man says of his dead brother, a mujahedin who fought the Soviets: “In my dreams, he sits beside a pool in a garden silently washing.”War is personalized most directly in Lamia Joreige’s “Objects of War, Lebanon, 1999-2006,” a series of video testimonies by civilians who lived through fighting that began in 1975 and has been nearly continuous since.During the panel, Joreige — the 38-year-old co-founder of the Beirut Art Center — wondered: “How do you represent such a dramatic experience?” Her answer was to offer time in front of the camera to survivors. Each had to bring an object to trigger a memory.One man brought his worry beads. He recounted a comical tiff with his roommate during the 2006 Israeli invasion of Lebanon. “This little war between us made us forget there was a real war outside” — at least until the shelling got worse, the man said. “But as the situation slightly calmed down, we returned to cursing each other.”A middle-aged woman showed three Walkmans to the camera. They saved the sanity of the young during heavy shelling 30 years ago. “I took refuge with the Walkman,” she said. “But then there were times music could no longer heal, because it gives an appetite for life.”Artists Wael Shawky (from left), Lamia Joreige, Peggy Ahwesh, William E. Jones, Harun Farocki, moderator Antje Ehmann, and Kota Ezawa participate in a panel discussion on the question of how wars of the present and the experience of war can be adequately represented.last_img read more

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McCartney named president of Smith

first_imgKathleen McCartney, dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) and the Gerald S. Lesser Professor in Early Childhood Development, will become the next president of Smith College, it was announced today.  McCartney will continue as HGSE dean through the end of this academic year and assume the presidency of Smith on July 1.“I am excited about this new chapter in my life, but I know it will be difficult for me to leave this special community of colleagues and friends,” McCartney said.  “I have enjoyed 13 rewarding years here.  Every Commencement I say that this community is like no other I know: mission-driven, passionate, and steadfast in its focus on education as the civil rights issue of our time.“It is an honor and privilege to lead the Harvard Graduate School of Education as we work, side by side, to improve the lives of learners,” McCartney told the HGSE community.  “I look forward to following the progress of this great institution in the years ahead, and I will smile with pride at each new success.”McCartney was named the HGSE’s acting dean in 2005 and its dean the following year.  Her deanship has featured efforts to focus the work of the School at the nexus of practice, policy, and research, and to develop a strategic plan to build a school of education for the 21st century.“Kathy McCartney has been a superlative leader of our Ed School during a pivotal moment in its history,” said Harvard President Drew Faust. “She has guided the launch of an imaginative new doctoral program in education leadership, oriented to practice, as well as a highly interdisciplinary new Ph.D. program in education, oriented to research.  She has strengthened and energized the faculty, increased student aid, deepened the School’s connections with other parts of the University, and elevated its impact on the world of education far beyond Harvard.“Kathy has done all this with boundless energy, a constant commitment to high standards and innovation, and a relentless passion for enhancing learning in all its forms,” Faust added.  “She has always asked how we can challenge ourselves to do better, and Harvard and the world of learning are much better as a result.”Smith College trustee Louise Parent, who chaired Smith’s presidential search, called McCartney “a pre-eminent scholar, a nationally recognized leader in education, a proven innovator, and a woman for the world.”Elizabeth Mugar Eveillard, chair of Smith’s board of trustees, added, “Kathy is a leader who inspires respect from everyone with whom she engages — students, staff, faculty, alumni. As we got to know her, we quickly realized why she is held in such esteem by peers and colleagues at every level.”*At the HGSE, in collaboration with colleagues, McCartney developed a strategic plan that has brought forth two of Harvard’s newest doctoral programs.The doctorate in education leadership (Ed.L.D.), launched in 2010, integrates the fields of education, management, and public policy to train leaders who can bring about systemic, transformational change to the education sector.  The program includes one year of a customized core curriculum taught by faculty from the HGSE, the Harvard Business School, and the Harvard Kennedy School; a second year of elective courses drawn from across Harvard; and a final yearlong residency in an institution engaged with educational change.The interdisciplinary Ph.D. in education was approved this year by the Faculty of Education and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) for launch in 2014.  The program, which will build on the strength of the School’s Ed.D. program, will join HGSE faculty with more than 50 colleagues from across Harvard, from a range of FAS departments as well as the Schools of government, law, medicine, and public health.Under McCartney’s leadership, the HGSE’s core faculty has grown by 25 percent, while markedly diversifying its ranks.  Sponsored research funding has more than tripled, and the School has played a key role in launching the Center on the Developing Child and growing the Center for Education Policy Research. McCartney has worked to fashion an extensive network of partnerships with more than 30 school districts and other institutions involved with educational leadership and reform.Financial aid for masters’ students has more than doubled during McCartney’s tenure as dean. The Ed.L.D. program has provided full funding for all students who have enrolled, and guaranteed funding for Ed.D. students has increased from one year to five years.  In addition, McCartney has overseen the modernization of HGSE classrooms, the advent of sustainability initiatives, and a major renovation of the HGSE’s Gutman Library, intended to transform the space into the intellectual and social heart of the School.The HGSE has raised more than $162 million in philanthropic support during McCartney’s time as dean, and she has helped the School maintain economic stability and momentum through the financial challenges that have buffeted higher education in recent years.*McCartney received her B.S. in psychology summa cum laude from Tufts University, where she now serves as a trustee.  She did her graduate work at Yale University, from which she holds an M.S. and Ph.D. in developmental psychology.  After serving as an assistant professor of psychology at Harvard, she was on the faculty of the University of New Hampshire from 1987 to 2000, rising to become professor of psychology and family studies and director of the UNH Child Study and Development Center.  She joined the HGSE faculty in 2000.The Society for Research in Child Development recognized McCartney with its Distinguished Contributions to Education in Child Development Award in 2009.  She was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences this year and is also a fellow of the American Educational Research Association, the American Psychological Association, and the American Psychological Society.  The Boston Globe named her as one of the 30 most innovative people in Massachusetts in 2011.McCartney’s own research focuses on early childhood experience and development.  She has published more than 150 articles and chapters on child care, early childhood education, and poverty. She is co-editor of “Experience and Development” (2009), “The Blackwell Handbook of Early Childhood Development” (2006), and “Best Practices in Quantitiative Methods for Developmentalists” (2006), among other works.  In addition, she is a member of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development’s Early Child Care Research Network, which produced the longitudinal study “Child Care and Child Development” (2005).*In a message to the HGSE community, Faust said that she will launch the search for a new dean soon.  She invited members of the community to send her early advice, in confidence, to [email protected]last_img read more

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Biostatistics prof wins ‘Champion of Change’ award for commitment to open science

first_imgJohn Quackenbush, professor of computational biology and bioinformatics in the Department of Biostatistics, has received a White House Open Science Champion of Change award in recognition of his efforts to ensure that vast amounts of genomic data are available, accessible, and useful. He was one of 13 people across the nation to be honored at a June 20, 2013 ceremony at the White House.The Champions of Change program was launched as part of President Obama’s Winning the Future Initiative, which highlights individuals, businesses, and organizations who make positive impacts on communities. Quackenbush and the other award winners were singled out for their efforts to make open sharing of scientific data a reality, which the Obama administration has deemed a priority for boosting scientific innovation.Quackenbush was cited in a White House press release for the founding of the company GenoSpace in 2011 with colleague Mick Correll. GenoSpace develops advanced software tools for collecting, interpreting, and sharing clinical and genomic data to further biomedical research and facilitate personalized medicine.In particular, Quackenbush was praised for the way GenoSpace has helped support the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation’s (MMRF) CoMMpass study. CoMMpass is a five-year longitudinal study gathering genomic and clinical information from 1,000 multiple myeloma patients. GenoSpace worked closely with MMRF to develop software ensuring that all the data from the study is accessible and useful to anyone interested—scientists, doctors, or patients. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Dean, wife bike from Ariz. to ND for cause

first_imgCollege of Science Dean Gregory Crawford and his wife Renate have encountered 42 flat tires and a few tarantulas while biking 2,200 across the country.The couple is raising money to represent the newly-enhanced relationship between Notre Dame and the Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation, which united to support research dedicated to finding a cure for Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease, according to the Crawfords’ blog documenting their experience.The couple will arrive at Main Circle on Monday between noon and 1:30 p.m.In their blog, the Craw-fords wrote that they are making the 2,200-mile challenge to raise awareness about NPC and the new partnership as well as to raise funds.This partnership will also be a model for future research projects of Notre Dame’s Center for Rare and Neglected Diseases.The Parseghian Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to funding medical research projects to find  treatments and a cure for NPC, a deadly neurodegenerative disease.Since they began their journey on July 24 in Tuscon, Ariz., Crawford said they have biked in six states and have overcome many challenges. On their longest travel day, the couple rode 120 miles through Texas.“By far, [the most rewarding part of the trip] has been meeting the Notre Dame family along the way,” Crawford said.Cindy and Mike Parseghian, both 1977 graduates of Notre Dame, established the foundation in 1994 because of the diagnosis of NPC for three of their four children.“It has been wonderful working with Cindy and Mike Parseghian, Coach Ara and the Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation,” he said. “They turned their hardship into hope for so many others.”The foundation currently funds 25 labs researching NPC, according to Notre Dame’s College of Science website. It has been a sponsor of medical breakthroughs including the identification of the gene responsible for NPC1, and the discovery of cholesterol pathway that occurs in all humans.After already biking over 2,000 miles, the Crawfords have hit the home stretch. Crawford said they have confidence in achieving the 2,200-mile goal.“We will succeed because of our common vision and direction, our unity of purpose, our sense of camaraderie and cooperation and our spirit of commitment to the values and vocation that have always guided the College of Science,” the Crawfords wrote in the blog.last_img read more

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Keira Knightley & the Cast of Therese Raquin Begin Previews

first_imgKeira Knightley is set to begin performances in Thérèse Raquin on October 1. The Oscar nominee is making her Broadway debut in the production, which will also star Tony winners Gabriel Ebert and Judith Light, along with Matt Ryan. Directed by Evan Cabnet, the show is scheduled to officially open on October 29 at Roundabout’s Studio 54.Based on the novel by Émile Zola and penned by Helen Edmundson, a quiet young woman with a restless spirit, Thérèse (Knightley) submits to a loveless life at the side of her weak and selfish husband Camille (Ebert) and her controlling mother-in-law Madame Raquin (Light)…until she meets his childhood friend Laurent (Ryan). When their overwhelming passion spins violently out of control, they realize that love can be a dangerous game, and sometimes there is no winner.The cast will also include David Patrick Kelly, Jeff Still, Glynis Bell, Ray Virta, Mary Wiseman, Alex Mickiewicz and Sara Topham. View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 3, 2016 Related Shows Therese Raquinlast_img read more

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Watering Right More than Turning On Sprinkler

first_imgSummer in Georgia means sweltering heat and widely scattered showers and thunderstorms.Your neighbor could get an inch of rain in their yard, while yours stays bone dry.”These isolated showers are usually just not enough to keep a yard green,”said Kerry Harrison, an engineer with the University of Georgia Extension Service.”Most turfs need an inch to an inch and a half of water every week.”A notable lack of rain lately has had many Georgians dashing to water hoses. But doyour homework first. Timing is everything, Harrison said.When watering lawns, the only water that matters is what makes it to the roots.Applying too little or too much at the wrong time may hurt your lawn while raising thewater bill.So it’scrucial to know how much water gets to the grass roots, Harrison said.”Not knowing your irrigation’s rate of application, whether it’s a sprinkler on a hose or apermanent system, is like driving a car with no speedometer,” Harrison said.Different systems apply water at different rates. Of all of the systems available,sprinkler hose combinations have the most variance in rate and the least uniformity. Useseveral rain gauges spaced evenly in the watering area to learn your system’s applicationrate.No matter what your application rate, when you water affects how much actually reachesthe grass roots, where it’s needed.”We have research, numbers and all the evidence we need to know that you can loseas much as half the water if it’s put out during daylight,” Harrison said.Direct sunlight, high temperatures and a light wind can evaporate or blow water awayfrom both the water stream and from the ground.”That means you have to put out twice as much,” he said. “And your waterbill may be twice as high. But your grass won’t benefit an equal amount.”When should you water your lawn?Nighttime is best, Harrison said.”It’sbetter for the grass, it’s a better use of the water and it’s usually easier to getbetter water pressure,” he said. “The only way it’s not better is for theperson who might have to get up from bed to turn it on or off.”A timer, though, can do that for you.Many permanent systems are on timers. It’s usually fairly easy to change that timing to twice a week, wateringeach time enough to apply about three-quarters of an inch. Many garden centers carrytimers that work just as easily on hose faucets.Watering during the day increases the time the grass is wet and makes disease problemsmore likely. At night, the grass is wet from dew already, so more water won’t hurt.Applying a little water often will keep grass roots close to the soil surface. So theydon’t reach thenutrients and water that are available deeper. A thorough soaking once or twice weeklyhelps roots grow deeper, resulting in healthier grass.Watering twice a week allows another chance for rain to supply the other half of thewater needed each week, Harrison said.last_img read more

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Confluence: Where Music Gathers

first_imgPanelists include: Dolph Ramseur, Paul Lohr, Jim Avett, Jessica Tomasin, Gregg McCraw, Eric Knapp, Mike Kitchen, Tim Scott, Jr.; Leah Ross, Kevin Hopkins, Keith Richards, Ellie Schwarz, Benton Wharton, Jim Mallonee and more. Wayne Martin, Sara Colée, Garret Woodward, Chris Garges, Jason Bieler, Leo Solis, Dane Page, Jason JetPlane, and Tony Arreaza. August 3 – 4, 2019.  Whitewater Center has created a new festival that aims to highlight, celebrate, and support the Charlotte music industry and community. Confluence is part festival, part conference, and part platform. It will feature two days of live performances and panel discussions covering a range of topics from Artist Development to the Economics of live shows with local, regional, and national professionals and advocates in these areas.  Artists include: RevelWood Mission, DownTown Abbey & The Echoes, Emily Sage, The Hawthornes, Junior Astronomers, Chócala, Sinners & Saints, The XMen, Cyanca, Jason Scavone, Jason JetPlane, Dexter Jordan, Jim Avett and David Childers, Orquesta Mayor, The Mike Strauss Band, Dane Page, Tony Eltora, Akita, and Lovell Bradford..  WHAT: Photo Courtesy of The U.S. National Whitewater Center About Paul Lohr: Owner and Founder of independent label Ramseur Records and current manager of The Avett Brothers, Bombadil, David Childers, and Samantha Crain.  Whitewater Center, 5000 Whitewater Center Parkway, Charlotte, NC 28214  WHERE: center_img With a spotlight on local musicians, Confluence aims to be a resource to all artists and musicians, promoters, producers, venue operators, and the public regardless of locale, while aiding in the development of Charlotte’s music identity.  Photo Courtesy of The U.S. National Whitewater Center Free to attend. Panel discussions require registration (free) due to limited seating capacity. Register HERE. WHEN: About Dolph Ramseur: President and owner of New Frontier Touring with a roster of 85+ bands and artists including The Avett Brothers, Highly Suspect, Rodney Crowell, Reckless Kelly, and DeVotchKa.  PRICE: Above Photo Courtesy of The U.S. National Whitewater Center WHO: last_img read more

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Mexico: Authorities seize armored vehicles from drug trade

first_img Guadalupe Correa Cabrera, a professor at the University of Texas at Brownsville who specializes in Mexican security issues, said the monster trucks reflect a military-type strategy by the cartels. “The Zetas came to modify and impose new forms of organized crime in Mexico,” said Correa, adding the trucks are similar to “battle tanks.” Armored chassis During an operation in early June 2011, authorities seized and dismantled a workshop in the Camargo municipality of Tamaulipas where the trucks were customized. The workshop was used to modify an array of vehicles, including semi-trailer trucks, bulldozers and tractors. The vehicles’ chassis are covered with at least inch-thick metal plates and the windows are replaced with steel, with just small openings to allow the driver and gunmen to see. The armor prevents the vehicles from being penetrated by bullets fired by small-caliber and automatic weapons, as it likely takes heavy weapons – such as rocket launchers or anti-tank rounds – to destroy them. At the Camargo workshop, authorities seized two completed vehicles, as well as 23 semi-trailer trucks, seven heavy trucks, three bulldozers and two tractors. Four vehicles with makeshift armor, six vehicles in the process of being armored and another six vehicles of different makes and models were also confiscated. In another operation carried out on Oct. 24, 2011, in the city of Culiacán in the state of Sinaloa, soldiers from the Mexican Army raided another clandestine workshop, taking 10 suspects into custody. MONTERREY, Mexico – Mexico’s armed forces last year seized more than 120 armored vehicles used by narco-trafficking cartels for their operations in the northeastern part of the country. Among them were 40 so-called “monsters,” used specifically to protect drug shipments from rival factions, said Gen. Miguel Ángel González, commander of the Eighth Military Zone of the Mexican army in Reynosa, capital of the state of Tamaulipas, where the majority of the confiscated vehicles are being held. “Monsters” are massive trucks that have been equipped with makeshift armor in clandestine workshops, mainly located in the same state. By the end of last year, authorities had seized 33 in Tamaulipas alone, according to González. “They’re real monsters, capable of carrying 12 gunmen,” he said. Authorities also seized four monster trucks in Sinaloa state, two in Nuevo León state and one each in the states of Zacatecas and Coahuila, according to the country’s National Defense Ministry (SEDENA). The monster trucks, carrying up to 30 tons of weight and as many as a dozen gunmen, are rarely found on the country’s main roads. They often travel along rural areas and are equipped to fend off attacks from rival cartels fighting for control of lucrative drug-smuggling routes, González said. “The main routes run through gaps in the municipality of China, in the state of Nuevo León, through Méndez and Miguel Alemán, in Tamaulipas, and the route continues toward the border with Matamoros, which is a city controlled by the Gulf cartel,” he said. “The cartels are fighting each other in order to control and protect these routes, both for trafficking drugs and people in one direction, and the reverse for smuggling arms into Mexico, as well as illegally importing a large amount of goods.” By Dialogo February 17, 2012last_img read more

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A call for action to the NCUA and state regulators

first_imgThe beginning of a New Year gives everyone an opportunity for a fresh start, to do things better and try to improve the lives of others if you are in a position to do so.As a former state and federal regulator of the financial services industry, my vision of regulation was simple. There should be as much as necessary and as little as possible.As much regulation as necessary means enough to ensure the safety and soundness of our depository institutions. As little as possible means not so much as to impair the ability for credit unions to help homeowners, small businesses, earn income and serve their members by providing quality financial services.Five years have passed since the financial crisis. The corner has clearly been turned as we see the stock market soar to record highs, gas prices fall to almost $2.00 a gallon, low cost mortgages for home buyers, a continued decline in unemployment and indications that 2015 will bring even better economic conditions.What is amazing about this turnaround is that it was achieved by the hard work of private enterprise and not by any action of the federal government. In fact, the inaction by Washington probably helped business further along the road to recovery.Now that we are on the right track to a more prosperous environment for the citizens of our country and businesses are once again thinking of expansion and hiring more people, it is time for regulators to do their part to help make sure that positive trend continues.At the end of last year, NCUA announced that it would create study groups to see how the agency could help credit unions by relaxing member business lending regulations and perhaps creating a unique way to allow credit unions to access supplemental capital.Study groups are an excellent way to foster dialog, generate ideas and provide recommendations. However, study groups, like pilot programs, have the ability to go on for too long. As a result, their ideas get heard later than sooner.If these groups meet often during the first quarter, write their report during the second, present it to NCUA in the third, maybe, just maybe, NCUA could do move to implement their ideas in the fourth. More than likely, one year from now we will be hoping the regulator will take action in 2016. Another year will have passed and government will again have not done anything to help. Private industry again will have to do it on their own.I challenge not only NCUA, but all federal and state regulators to take that one step back, to look with fresh eyes at those regulations no longer needed, regulations that stifle rather than strengthen, and within the first six months of 2015, identify those that should be changed, improved or eliminated. Then once identified, take the needed corrective action to move things along.As much as necessary, as little as possible. Not rocket science, but clearly a way to provide the tools to our financial services industry to help businesses and our economy to continue to grow and improve. 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Michael Fryzel Michael Fryzel is the former Chairman of the National Credit Union Administration and is now a financial services consultant and government affairs attorney in Chicago. He can be reached at … Detailslast_img read more

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