Category: fglhuwia

Stress watch

first_imgHere’s something to get the drill sergeant bakery production managers among you excited. This is the Exmocare BT2 watch, designed to measure workers’ physiological data, such as heart rate, location, body temperature, skin temperature and moisture levels. A central database then picks up the transmitted info for analysis, and alerts the employer to any slacking. We’ve been wearing them on BB for weeks now and the alarm hasn’t gone off once…last_img

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Hummingbird moves into Middle East

first_imgThe Hummingbird Bakery has signed a new international agreement with a Dubai-based franchise partner, according to reports.A number of websites based in the Middle East have claimed the London-based cupcake bakery is to open its first oversees franchise outlet during September in Dubai Mall, with Daud Arabian, a subsidary of conglomerate The Daud Group of Oman.A series of The Hummingbird Bakery outlets are expected to open over the next 10 years, with further sites planned for the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Qatar, Jordan, The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Oman, Kuwait, Lebanon and Egypt.Tarek Malouf, founder of The Hummingbird Bakery, told arabianbusiness.com: “We are absolutely thrilled to now be in the final stages of becoming an international brand. Since opening our first bakery on Portobello Road in London back in 2004, it has always been our mission to bring American baking to London. This is something we have achieved.“We now look forward to the exciting challenge of bringing The Hummingbird Bakery’s brand of high-quality American baking to the world.”Daud Arabian was selected as The Hummingbird Bakery’s preferred franchise partner because of its wealth of experience and proven track record in the casual dining sector.The firm has brought a number of brands to the Middle East, including California Pizza Kitchen, YO! Sushi, Morelli’s Gelato, Gourmet Burger Kitchen, Trader Vic’s and Pink Berry.last_img read more

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Ex-Ohio State Basketball Coach Quotes “Truckin’” In Press Conference After Being Let Go [Watch]

first_imgThe lyrics from the Grateful Dead‘s “Truckin,” while admittedly a bit cliche, aren’t a bad description of Matta’s tenure at Ohio State. When he took the job during the 2004-2005 season, Ohio State was ineligible for the postseason due to NCAA infractions, but Matta helped guide the school’s basketball program in the right direction. He went 337-123 overall, winning at least 20 games in all but one season, and brought teams to the Final Four in 2007 and 2012. Ten of his former players went on to be selected in the NBA Draft. However, the team has struggled in recent seasons.According to the school’s athletic director Gene Smith, the decision to part ways with Matta was mutual. “We weren’t winning the recruiting battles,” Smith said. “As we started talking about it Friday, the flow of the conversation took me to the realization as I said to him, ‘This might be the time to make a leadership change,’ and he agreed,” mentioning that he was “trying to get healthy.”Who knows, maybe he’s just super stoked on the top-notch shows Dead & Company is churning out this summer and wanted to ditch the recruiting circuit and jump on tour instead. If that’s the case, let the record show we’re all about it–follow that golden road, Thad! See you on Shakedown.[h/t – USA Today] On Monday afternoon, The Ohio State University made news in the sports world by firing their head men’s basketball coach Thad Matta. In a statement regarding his parting of ways with the Ohio State basketball program, Matta referenced a “great song” with a familiarly grateful message. “This has probably been the greatest 13 years of my life,” remarked Matta, “If you wanted an exact thought of where my emotions are, there’s a great song that says, ‘Sometimes the light shines brightly on me, other times I can barely see. Lately it’s occurred to me what a long, strange trip it’s been,” the ex-Buckeye mused with a restrained smile.last_img read more

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Tom Morello Announces 2019 U.S. Tour

first_imgRock guitarist Tom Morello, best known for his tenure with Rage Against The Machine and Audioslave, has announced a batch of 2019 tour dates. After embarking on a recent interactive speaking tour, Morello will be getting back to his regular live concert configuration. The tour will include an immersive live production designed by creative director Sean Evans and featute material from Morello’s recent The Atlas Underground studio release.Tom Morello will open up his tour with an appearance at Miami, FL’s Ultra Music Festival on March 29th, followed by performances at Jacksonville, FL’s Welcome to Rockville (5/3); Chattanooga, TN’s The Signal (5/4); Asheville, NC’s The Orange Peel (5/5); Asbury Park, NJ’s Stone Pony (5/7); Pittsburgh, PA’s Rex Theater (5/8); Indianapolis, IN’s Deluxe at Old National Centre (5/10); Louisville, KY’s Mercury Ballroom (5/11); Rockingham, NC’s Epicenter Festival (5/12); New York City’s Irving Plaza (5/14); Norfolk, VA’s NorVa (5/15); Columbus, OH’s Sonic Temple Art + Music Festival (5/17); Buffalo, NY’s Town Ballroom (5/18); Columbia, MD’s Merriweather Post Pavilion (5/19); and a previously announced, tour-closing performance at the inaugural End Of The Rainbow Festival, set to take place May 24th-26th at the iconic Gorge Amphitheatre.Morello shared his thoughts on the upcoming tour in a press release. He explains,The Atlas Underground Tour is one part Marshall stack guitar madness and one part bass drop meltdown. The show will be an intense sonic and visual ‘less talk, more rock’ experience that’s somewhere between a crazy mosh pit, an illegal rave, a subversive art installation, and a prison riot.For ticketing and more information, head to Tom Morello’s website.Tom Morello 2019 Tour Dates:March 29, 2019 Miami, FL Ultra Music FestivalMay 3, 2019 Jacksonville, FL Welcome to RockvilleMay 4, 2019 Chattanooga, TN The SignalMay 5, 2019 Asheville, NC The Orange PeelMay 7, 2019 Asbury Park, NJ Stone PonyMay 8, 2019 Pittsburgh, PA Rex TheaterMay 10, 2019 Indianapolis, IN Deluxe at Old National CentreMay 11, 2019 Louisville, KY Mercury BallroomMay 12, 2019 Rockingham, NC Epicenter FestivalMay 14, 2019 New York, NY Irving PlazaMay 15, 2019 Norfolk, VA The NorvaMay 17, 2019 Columbus, OH Sonic Temple Art + Music FestivalMay 18, 2019 Buffalo, NY Town BallroomMay 19, 2019 Columbia, MD DC101 Kerfuffle / Merriweather Post PavilionMay 24-26 Quincy, WA Bassnectar’s End Of The Rainbow FestivalView All Tour Dateslast_img read more

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At 101, another look around

first_imgHarvard’s first commencing scholars — all nine of them — got their diplomas in 1642. Since then, University-wide, there have been nearly 450,000 graduates. But how many of them were ever attacked by pirates?At least one: Clarence Mendel Agress ’33, a California cardiologist, researcher, and late-in-life novelist who is now 101. In the early 1950s, off the west coast of Mexico, he and a friend — both amateur yachtsmen — were making a daring, long-distance run to La Paz in a 32-foot Grand Banks powerboat. Bandits waylaid the pair in an area aptly called Pirate’s Cove. “We had to fire a shotgun at them to keep them away,” he said.Agress’ latest adventure was a visit to Harvard in late May. There were no pirates, unless you include the ones in costume in Harvard Square. But the retired doctor had a big crew with him: about 15 members of his family, representing four generations. Agress was in Cambridge for his first Commencement since late in the Eisenhower administration.On the day of event itself, May 30, he had a moment of surprise. “I was the only one of the class at the 1933 table.” He had done some research, and figured that something like 11 College graduates from his year were still alive.Being a 1933 graduate of Harvard College makes Agress one of the last living members of the class that inaugurated Harvard’s House system. Lowell and Dunster opened in 1930 and five others in 1931.Agress transferred to Harvard after a freshman year at the University of Texas, lived in a boarding house his second year, and by his junior year was one of the first residents of Winthrop House.Coming back to Harvard wasn’t like motoring across the ocean to La Paz, but Agress still had to get his sea legs. “It looked strange,” he said of his first glimpse of the Yard in more than 50 years. “Maybe it was because of all the furniture and the paved walks. I was really disoriented until I saw the John Harvard Statue.”He and his family hired a driver and took in the sights of Boston. Of course the tour included points of interest in Harvard’s older corners. Agress looked up Winthrop House, recalling that there had once been an entrance off the street. He remembered the first time his tutor wheeled up to that door on a bicycle. As for nearby Lowell House, Agress said, it “still seemed to be in the right place.”Lowell House — named after A. Lawrence Lowell, the Harvard president who inspired the House system — reminded Agress of a story more than 80 years old, one that “nobody ever found out about,” he said.“I played pranks,” he began. In those days, that was helped along by his complete access to the Harvard tunnel system. (He was studying a subterranean insect.) On the night of a formal dance at Lowell House, Agress bought a pig in Boston, greased it up in Cambridge, and set it loose in Lowell. “What a commotion that caused,” he said. Afterward, Agress returned to Winthrop, put on a suit, and went to the dance.He was never fingered for the greased-pig caper, but nevertheless acquired a covert reputation for mischief-making. Later, when a cow got pushed into the Lowell bell tower, all eyes were on the future doctor. (Let history note: Clarence Agress was not responsible for that one.)The years Agress spent at Harvard were eventful principally because of the new House system. But there were smaller, near-forgotten moments of history. The first “smoker” — official party — for the class, in early 1930, involved “music, speeches, cheese-throwing,” according to a Class Album account. During his sophomore year, the Faculty Club was being built, along with the Wigglesworth dormitories. Widener introduced its first turnstiles (for security), regular riots broke out in the subway after hockey games, and a debate flared up over the propriety of adding the names of Harvard’s German World War I dead in Memorial Chapel. (They got a plaque.)In the spring of Agress’ junior year, a student riot in Harvard Square had to be quelled with tear gas and billy clubs. By the Class’ senior year, house sports were thriving (Agress played golf for Winthrop), and the Harvard Lampoon announced the election of James Bryant Conant as president before the Corporation even knew about it.Agress went on to be a man of astonishing accomplishments. He served in the China-Burma-India theater for five years in World War II; learned Chinese during his service (he still keeps up); hit the high seas (later co-building a yacht with his friend Walter Matthau); took up the Hammond organ; learned to paint in oils; dabbled in astronomy; wrote “Energetics,” a book on fitness and longevity; and penned a line of novels (he is working on his ninth).Early in his medical career, Agress decided to both practice and research. Just after the war he helped pioneer the use of radioactive iodine to treat thyroid disease. He later founded the first cardiology unit on the West Coast, invented the first heart catheter, treated Hollywood stars (he won’t say who or how many), devised the world’s first blood test to predict heart attacks, and — to stop far short of saying everything — invented the first injectable enzyme to break up the blood clots that form after a heart attack. (Up to that point, pathologists insisted that all such clots were postmortem.)Agress is a modest man, but he did say, with pride, “I’ve probably saved more lives than anybody at Harvard.”One other invention of his was out of this world. During the 1960s, Agress headed a team that devised a heart monitoring system for astronauts. “When [Neil] Armstrong stepped on the moon,” he said of the first landing in 1969, “he was wearing my gadget.”In the 1980s, Agress was regularly playing golf and tennis and running up and down the hills of Bel Air with his schnauzer, Shana. Today, he still stays fit, and looks it. At Commencement, Agress was on foot in the alumni procession. Ahead of him, from the classes of 1929 and 1930, were two men in wheelchairs.You never know where memory will go. For Agress, of all the sights at Harvard, only the Charles River seemed the same as 80 years ago. He remembered a winter day when the river had frozen over. “We all went ice skating on this utterly smooth surface,” said Agress. “I never will forget that.”last_img read more

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Plant breeding

first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaCharlie Brummer believes there is room for improvement – at least when it comes to plants.“I’m a plant breeder, which means my job is to develop new plant varieties with improved traits,” said Brummer, a crop and soil sciences professor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.Whether creating better crops to fuel the United States in the future, ones to help farmers make more money – or just one with a prettier bloom, plant breeding is basically a simple concept, he said. Man’s been doing it for 10,000 years. “What we do, and what those early humans did, is to select among a population of plants for the ones that have the traits we want – large seed size, green leaves, big red flowers, etc.,” he said. “We look for good plants, cross them together and get even better plants.”Brummer started his career as an undergraduate potato breeder at Penn State in 1985. As the director of the UGA Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, he now breeds alfalfa, white and red clover, tall fescue, orchard grass and perennial ryegrass. He is also part of some major grants award to UGA to develop bioenergy crops such as switch grass.Biofuel is a political topic that’s tough to predict, he said. When or whether the alternative energy industry strengthens in the U.S. depends on what kinds of programs are put in place now and in the future.“We can manipulate plants in various ways just through breeding to make better feedstock for whatever biofuel platform ultimately develops,” he said.From his perspective as a breeder, it’s hard to select for one trait one year and another trait the next. The process takes time and needs consistent goals or targets to work.“I don’t think breeding will be the deciding factor, though, in whether a biofuel industry develops or not,” he said. “Breeding can certainly tailor better biofuels to that industry, but some combination of government and private enterprise nurturing the industry as it gets going has to occur for us so that growing biofuels in the first place is economically feasible. Once that happens, we (the breeders) can work our magic and further increase the productivity and profitability of the sector.”Plant breeding has undergone huge changes since the early part of the 20th century when it was formalized as a discipline, he said. Gregor Mendel and Charles Darwin crossed plants to produce new varieties. But the later application of genetic principles to the plant breeding process opened up the discipline’s possibilities and helped the breeder predict what could be.“More recently, the application of biotechnolgy and genomics has given plant breeders a much more precise understanding of the crops or plants they work with and presents opportunities to manipulate traits more efficiently and effectively,” he said. “The use of these tools is rapidly expanding, and together with more sophisticated statistical tools, really opens up many possibilities to develop superior plant varieties in the future.”One thing hasn’t changed, though. A good plant breeder still has to be a kind of Jack-of-all-trades, so to speak, he said. From pathology, entomology and agronomy to biology and statistics, he has many tools to use in the toolbox. “We apply all this different technology to the actual plants that people grow.”last_img read more

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Gut check

first_imgThe back of a juice bottle contains all kinds of information about your favorite breakfast beverage: calorie content, grams of sugar and the amount of antioxidants in the mix. But what you don’t see on the nutrition label is how your body processes those nutrients-how much of the juice’s sugar and vitamin content is absorbed by your digestive system. Fanbin Kong, a researcher in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Food Science Technology, has spent his career working to understand how the human body reacts to different kinds of food. “We want to know the ingredients and the structure of the food,” Kong said. “How this will affect the digestion and also the absorption of the nutrients, and how that relates to your health.” Kong has spent the past several years developing models of the human stomach that realistically demonstrate the way the food breakdown in the stomach is affected by contraction forces from peristaltic movement of stomach walls. “We’re not talking about a set of beakers here,” he said. The model stomach crushes, churns and provides the same steady stream of digestive enzymes and acids that are present in the human stomach. Working with the UGA Instrument Shop, he is creating a novel model for an artificial intestine. He also is designing a new, more advanced artificial stomach model. The models are a way to test the efficacy of functional foods and develop foods that help solve some health concerns people face today. “One of the things that I’ve done is studied how food is digested from an engineering perspective because, basically, I’m a food engineer,” Kong said. “So we look at food as a material. How does food’s microstructure affect its digestion? How will hydrodynamic and mechanical forces present in the gastrointestinal tract affect food breakdown and nutrient release? “This information is very useful in the way we design foods, especially functional foods,” Kong also said. “You can see nothing from their labels. You can see the content, but you don’t know how it’s going to be absorbed by your body.” Functional foods are products like energy bars, vitamin-fortified juices, nourishment shakes for the elderly and children or milk for people who are lactose intolerant. Currently, Kong is focused on how the body extracts phytochemicals-like tannin-from food and how these chemicals affect the way the body absorbs other nutrients. One project involves tannic acid, one type of tannin. The acids have antioxidant properties that are good for humans, but they also affect the way the body absorbs sugar. Tannic acid inhibits the enzyme that allows the body to absorb sugar. “We are eating tannins every day, but it doesn’t work like we would like it to because the concentrations are low,” Kong said. “Second, when the tannins go through your stomach and intestines, you don’t know how much is released. And third, even when the tannin is released in your stomach, it reacts with the proteins and the enzymes there and you lose that action.” Kong has developed a way to create tiny beads of tannic acid that can be incorporated into breads and carbohydrate-rich foods. The beads are designed to dissolve in the neutral pH environment of the intestine where 80 to 90 percent of the digestion of carbohydrates takes place. The tannic acid will inhibit some digestion, so that less simple sugars are produced for absorption, allowing people on sugar-restricted diets to eat carbohydrates without having their blood sugar spike.last_img read more

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Insurance co. to give $500,000 to VT policyholders

first_imgSeeking to prevent tragedy and raise awareness of improper heatingsystems, local Concord Group Insurance Companies is giving $500,000 totheir policyholders for the purchase of home heating fuel this winterseason. Thousands of individuals and families across the state ofVermont are eligible for Concord Group’s one-time “A Warm Hand:Policyholder Heating Lottery” program.According to Joseph A. Desmond, Chairman and CEO of Concord Group, “Werecognize the unique challenge the economy causes for many families thisholiday season. We have seen our policyholders through the GreatDepression, oil embargo and other economic challenges. This is one ofthe ways we can show our policyholders – in a way that touches theirlives – how we value their trust.”All Concord Group Insurance homeowner and mobile homeowner policyholdersof record as of October 31, 2008 are eligible in the state of Vermont. Concord Group Insurance will award fuel voucher checks in a lotteryformat. Policyholders who wish to participate can register one of threeways: . Directly on Concord Group’s web site located atwww.concordgroupinsurance.com(link is external).. Through their local Independent Insurance Agent who willregister them with Concord Group.. Or walk into one of Concord Group’s local offices in Concord,NH; Berlin, VT or Auburn, ME and register directly with the company. “Unlike some other companies, we’ve been prudent in our investments and in our daily operations,” said Concord Group President Linda J. Day. “We felt that this was the best way to offer safety and security to thethousands of New England families who turn to us for peace of mind.”Each fuel voucher check will be awarded at $250 each. Four drawings are scheduled: December 15, 2008; January 15, 2009; February 16, 2009 andMarch 16, 2009. All fuel voucher checks will be distributed by the end of March, 2009.Fuel sources eligible for the fuel assistance check include heating oil;natural gas; electric; propane (LPG); wood pellets; fire wood.last_img read more

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Olympic Waffles

first_imgFun fact: Olympians often eat chocolate covered waffles between Super G runs.At least, that’s what I tell my kids, Cooper and Addie, when we reach the top of Snowshoe Mountain and I spy the Waffle Cabin just to the right of the lift. I’ve come to believe that family ski trips are as much about the chocolate breaks as finding powder stashes. They typically need the combo of carbs and high fructose corn syrup to stay energetic on the mountain, but this time, they shrug off my suggestion for a waffle break. They want to keep skiing.“Sarah’s gonna show us some moguls,” my daughter says, before scooting off towards the sign that suggests only experts should keep going.We’re half way through a day of private lessons at West Virginia’s Snowshoe Mountain and it’s going better than I expected.My kids, at the ripe old age of nine, have reached the point where they know everything and no longer need my help. Every father outlives his usefulness, but I was hoping it would take longer than nine years in my case. While they might not take advice from their dad anymore, my kids still need ski lessons. They’re solid skiers, able to handle every blue slope and some black diamonds they come across, but they have the same bad habits that plague most skiers who’ve never been taught by professionals.They sit in the back seat. They’re not aggressive. I could use a little help myself, and my wife is always game for improving her form, so I figured hiring a private instructor to ski with us for a day could be the key to a successful family ski trip. We could spend the day ripping powder together, but also improve together. Kind of like a family therapy session.But on skis. I envision learning how to do backflips off of tabletops while my kids realize they still have much to learn from their dear old dad. In this fantasy, they’d ultimately beg me to teach them how to do backflips off of tabletops and promise to keep skiing with me even when they’re in high school and all of their friends refuse to hang out with their parents. In short, I’m trying to ensure family solidarity through downhill improvement. I’m playing the long-con here.Our instructor’s name is Sarah.She’s from Ohio and she has an almost supernatural ability to see straight through all of my posturing to reveal my faults. When we met, she asked each of us what aspects of our skiing we’d like to improve. My kids want to ski moguls better. My wife wants to ski steeps more aggressively. I told her I wanted to learn how to do a Double McTwist 1260—Shaun White’s signature trick. Never mind that it’s a snowboarding trick and I’m a skier, or that it’s a half pipe trick and I’ve never skied a half pipe in my life.I want to be a badass and I want Sarah to help me.After watching me take turns down a blue slope, Sarah has different plans. She strips me down to the basics. My feet are too close together (because I was raised in the ‘80s and that’s how people skied back then). I’m too far in the backseat. I need to push my shins forward, but loosen up my upper body. Be more aggressive, but relax. It’s like some sort of Zen Buddhist riddle.Sarah is really good at small talk. Within a few runs, she knows all about our dogs and the other sports the kids play and their favorite music. And she’s killing it with the kids, taking them through the basics of an aggressive ski stance—knees forward, shins against the boots, hands out front. I notice a difference with the kids after just a few short runs. They’re focused and taking the lessons seriously, engaged in a way that they rarely are when I’m trying to teach them something on our local hill.Sarah has us ski backwards to reinforce the aggressive position.She has us play follow the leader. She has us skiing on one ski to highlight any weaknesses in our stance. At one point, I watch my kids ski backwards through a small stand of trees, and a vision of their future flitters through my mind. I see my kids’ double podium finish in the Olympics (twin golds!). I see a life of World Cup glory. I see them starring in the occasional segment for Teton Gravity Research, or Warren Miller.I’m kidding. I don’t want that life for either of my children—I just want them to be confident on the hill and love skiing. I want family ski trips to be a tradition for years to come. I just want them to be as stoked as I am when there’s fresh powder in the forecast.Sarah has the kids skiing like pros in a couple of hours, but the best part of having an instructor is that she gets to be the bad guy, which frees me up to joke around. While Sarah gives them drills and techniques to work on, I can throw snowballs and suggest we take chocolate-covered waffle breaks.The mogul run is a sheet of ice.It’s been a rough winter, even in the typically snowy mountains of West Virginia, so Sarah makes an adjustment on the fly, teaching us how to set an edge on a steep, icy slope. It’s a tough lesson for kids to learn because they have to abandon the wedge and move to a completely parallel stance, while basically putting all of their weight on the thin edge of one ski. No more pizza, all French fry. And they have to do it on a steep, black diamond slope that’s basically become a vertical ice skating rink.Addie goes first, followed quickly by Cooper, who has a knack for letting his sister enter perilous scenarios ahead of him. Whether it’s riding a bike or jumping off a rock into a river, he’ll suggest Addie take the first plunge and then make the appropriate course corrections if there’s an accident. But this time, there’s no accident. Addie sends the ice beautifully, setting an edge and sticking with the parallel stance through the icy section. Then she seamlessly hits the moguls as the slope mellows out. Cooper does the same.I’m beaming with pride as I tackle the ice myself, thinking of the far-off lands we’ll now be able to ski as a family.In my mind, I’m booking our next ski trip to Jackson Hole. And then I lose my edge and slide down most of the slope on my back and a bruised hip.Sarah leaves us towards the end of the day—she has another client to teach, another family to set on the right track—so we take a break at the Boat House, a restaurant at the bottom of Snowshoe’s main slope that has a deck hanging over Shaver’s Lake. Before I let Sarah go, I ask her for advice on helping the kids improve after we get back to our little home resort and don’t have a private coach. I’m looking for tips and drills, maybe some dry land training suggestions for the offseason, but again, she takes me back to the basics.“Don’t forget, skiing is supposed to be fun, right?” she says. “Make sure they’re having fun. That’s how they’ll improve the fastest. And that’s what will keep them wanting more.”I think about her advice as my wife and I share a beer on the boathouse deck while the kids slide down a snowy slope below the lift line on their bellies, pretending to be a couple of penguins. I remember when most of our ski days looked like this. Snowball fights and hot cocoa breaks. We started the kids skiing early but made sure it was more about having fun than learning how to ski. Along the way, it got serious. I got serious. I started focusing less on fun and more on improvement. Mistakes. Progression. Perfection.The next day, there is no Sarah. No lessons. No drills. Just the family skiing together.If it were up to me, we’d progress through the entire mountain, hitting increasingly difficult terrain and working on the tools that Sarah has given us to make us more efficient, better equipped skiers. We’d tackle the day like robots working through a program, maybe work on putting together a highlight reel the family could shop around to potential sponsors. But I’m trying to take Sarah’s advice to heart, so I let the kids lead us. Every once in a while, I’ll remind them to push their shins forward, or weight the edge of their ski, but mostly the kids set the agenda. We ski where they want to ski, eat when they want to eat. As a result, we spend most of the day doing laps in Snowshoe’s progression park.Typically, I avoid the terrain park for a couple of reasons.First: I’m old and terrain parks are full of annoyingly young people. People with energy who bounce when they hit the snow. Second: I don’t bounce when I hit the snow, so the idea of hitting a jump or rail and not landing it terrifies me. I can hear my brittle bones cracking as we drop into the first jump. But Snowshoe’s Progression Park is full of mellow hits—table tops and step ups, a few boxes and a mini half pipe. The entire park is designed to allow you to take each obstacle at your own pace. If you want to go big and catch huge air, you can. If you want to take it mellow and roll over everything, that works too.My kids start mellow, but after a few laps they’re getting legitimate air, hitting the tabletops and landing on the downhill side with grace. Because they’re going higher on each jump, I’m going higher and higher on each jump. The kids are pushing me. Not on purpose, but they are. I can’t let my nine-year-olds get bigger air than me. I can’t let them become better skiers than me. Not yet. Suddenly, the roles are reversed. I started this family ski camp with the hopes that we’d all improve, but the kids would find new reason to look up to me for guidance. Here I am struggling to keep up with them. The students have become the masters.Parenthood is baffling.I’m having a hard time coming to grips with the fact that my kids can handle themselves with confidence on terrain that’s giving me pause, but I still have to cut their PBJ sandwiches diagonal, or they’ll get jelly all over their faces.By the afternoon, my wife and daughter have called it quits, and my legs are getting weak. Cooper is still going strong, squeezing the most out of our time on the mountain, but I’m spent. After a few wobbly landings, I eat it in the half pipe, catching an edge on the rim and sliding to the center of the tube. Cooper does what all skiers do when they see a partner has fallen. He skies right up to me as fast as he can and sprays snow in my face. It’s a tradition.“That’s it,” I say, laughing. “I’m done. We’re getting chocolate covered waffles now.”last_img read more

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Nominations sought for annual pro bono awards

first_imgNominations sought for annual pro bono awards September 1, 2002 Regular News Nominations sought for annual pro bono awardscenter_img Lawyers who donate services to the needy are being sought for public recognition by the Florida Supreme Court and The Florida Bar.One lawyer from each judicial circuit and an out-of-state recipient will receive the Bar President’s Pro Bono Service Award. The chief justice will give the Tobias Simon Pro Bono Service Award to the lawyer who is deemed an outstanding example of dedication to the legal needs of the poor.Nominations also are being solicited for the Chief Justice’s Law Firm Commendation and the Voluntary Bar Association Pro Bono Service Award. The awards recognize a firm and a voluntary bar association that have provided significant pro bono legal assistance to individuals or groups which cannot otherwise afford legal services.Nominations may be made by any person or organization by contacting the circuit representative shown below. Nomination forms are available from the Bar’s Public Service Programs Department, telephone (800) 342-8060, ext. 5810 or via e-mail at [email protected] Eligible lawyers must be licensed to practice in Florida and not be employed by an organization which primarily delivers free legal services to the poor. The nominee should be a lawyer who, with no expectation of receiving a fee, provides direct delivery of legal services in civil or criminal matters to a client or group that does not have the resources to hire counsel.The deadline is September 20.The Florida Bar President’s Pro Bono Service Awards were established in 1981 to recognize individual service in specific Florida judicial circuits.The Tobias Simon Pro Bono Service Award commemorates Miami civil rights lawyer Tobias Simon, who died in 1982.The chief justice’s awards are believed to be the first of their kind in the nation conferring recognition of a state’s highest court on a firm and voluntary bar for pro bono services. Florida Bar president’s pro bono award circuit committee chairs FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Alan Bart Bookman P. O. Drawer 1271 30 S. Spring St. Pensacola, Florida 32501-5612 (850)433-6581 Fax: (850)434-7163 Email: [email protected] SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Kelly Overstreet Johnson Broad & Cassel P.O. Box 11300 Tallahassee, Florida 32302-3300 (850)681-6810 Fax: (850)681-9792 Email: [email protected] THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Gregory Stuart Parker P.O. Box 509 Perry, Florida 32348-0509 (850)223-1990 Fax: (850)223-1991 Email: [email protected] FOURTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Henry Matson Coxe III Bedell Dittmar Devault, et al. 101 E. Adams St. Jacksonville, Florida 32202-3303 (904)353-0211 Fax: (904)353-9307 Email: [email protected] FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT William Harper Phelan Jr. Bond, Arnett & Phelan, P.A. 101 S.W. 3rd St. Ocala, Florida 34474-4132 (352)622-1188 Fax: (352)622-1125 Email: [email protected] SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT John Allen Yanchunis 100 2nd Ave. S., Ste. 1201 Saint Petersburg, Florida 33701-4338 (727)823-3837 Fax: (727)822-2969 Email: [email protected] SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Charles Chobee Ebbets Ebbetts, Armstrong & Traster 210 S. Beach St., Ste. 200 Daytona Beach, Florida 32114-4404 (386)253-2288 Fax: (386)257-1253 Email: [email protected] EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Robert Anthony Rush 726 N.E. 1st St. Gainesville, Florida 32601-5374 (352)373-7566 Email: [email protected] NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Russell W. Divine Divine & Estes, P.A. P.O. Box 3629 Orlando, Florida 32802-3629 (407)426-9500 Fax: (407)426-8030 Email: [email protected] TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Robert Michael Brush Brush & Pujol, P.A. 825 E. Main St. Lakeland, Florida 33801-5151 (863)603-0563 Fax: (863)603-0884 Email: [email protected] ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Arthur Halsey Rice Rice Pugatch Robinson & Schil 848 Brickell Ave., Ste. 1100 Miami, Florida 33131-2943 (305)379-3121 Fax: (305)379-4119 Email: [email protected] TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Anthony J. Abate Abel Band, et al. P.O. Box 49948 Sarasota, Florida 34230-6948 (941)366-6660 Fax: (941)366-3999 Email: [email protected] THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Richard Allen Gilbert De La Parte & Gilbert 101 E. Kennedy Blvd., Ste. 3400 Tampa, Florida 33602-5195 (813)229-2775 Fax: (813)229-2712 Email: [email protected] FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Robert Clarence Blue Jr. 221 McKenzie Ave. P.O. Box 70 Panama City, Florida 32402-0070 (850)769-1414 Fax: (850)784-0857 Email: [email protected] FIFTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Jerald S. Beer Boose Casey, et al. 515 N. Flagler Dr., Ste. 1800 West Palm Beach, Florida 33401-4330 (561)832-5900 Fax: (561)820-0389 Email: [email protected] SIXTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT James Samuel Lupino Hershoff, Lupino & Mulick LLP 90130 Old Hwy. Tavernier, Florida 33070-2348 (305)852-8440 Fax: (305)852-8848 [email protected] SEVENTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Henry Latimer Greenberg, Traurig 515 E. Las Olas Blvd. Fl. 14 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301-2296 (954)468-1729 Fax: (954)765-1477 Email: [email protected] EIGHTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Clifton Adamson McClelland Jr. Holland & Knight L. L. P. 1499 S. Harbor City Blvd., Ste. 2 Melbourne, Florida 32901-3245 (321)951-1776 Fax: (321)723-4092 Email: [email protected] NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Louis B. Vocelle Jr. Clem Polackwich, Vocelle et 3333 20th St. Vero Beach, Florida 32960-2469 (772)562-8111 Fax: (772)562-2870 Email: [email protected] TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT James Christopher Lombardo Woodward Pires & Lombardo 3200 Tamiami Trl., N., Ste. 200 Naples, Florida 34103-4105 (941)649-6555 Fax: (941)649-7342 Email: [email protected] OUT-OF-STATE Richard Arthur Tanner 250 Bellevue Ave. Montclair, NJ 07043-1318 (973)744-2100 Fax: (973)509-9521 Email: [email protected]last_img read more

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