Category: hqzxturt

Professional dilemmas

first_imgProfessional dilemmasOn 1 Oct 2003 in Personnel Today I’ma training manager and have been asked to write some e-learning material forsome in-house product training. Are there any guidelines you can give me?Designingand writing e-learning content is much more complex than producing classroommaterial. You need to understand how to organise course material so it islogically ordered and includes plenty of meaningful interaction. You must beable to write precise behavioural objectives and have a clear understanding oflearning theory – especially related to learning online. Theability to design questions and analyse responses are both essential skills.You will also need a good writing style and the ability to adapt to meet theneeds of different learners. You must also be able to set upstatistically-based validation tests that demonstrate where courses needstrengthening or adapting.Youcan write acceptable basic e-learning courses using only HTML code. However,access to well-designed authorware will be helpful. Look at a number ofdemonstrations before you commit yourself. You need to consider whether youwill be adding more e-learning courses and, if so, whether the authorware willenable you to manage them. For this, you would be better off with a learningcontent management system (LCMS) than simple authorware.E-learnersneed a lot more support. You could provide e-tutors and ensure the organisationprovides face-to-face support. These should be subject experts who providefeedback to learners’ exercises. Face-to-face support can come from an in-house‘mentor’, whose role is to allocate time and resources and provideencouragement.Iwould recommend you take some training on an accredited course. There includethe Institute of IT Training, the CIPD, Sheffield Hallam University (MSc),Sheffield College and Sherpa Integrated Learning.Makesure you take a course that deals with learning design, not just thetechnology, –  with an appropriate levelof accreditation.BrianHolley is MD of Sherpa Integrated Learning. He has written Designing andWriting E-learning Content and Effective Online Tutoring www.sherpa.org.uk Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Indiana Homeland Security Foundation Awards More Than $175,000 in Grants to Local Public Safety…

first_imgIndianapolis – Governor Mike Pence today announced the Indiana Homeland Security Foundation has approved more than $175,000 in grants to aid local public safety agencies statewide.“These grants demonstrate Indiana’s commitment to the safety and security of its citizens,” said Governor Pence. “These funds and this program are saving Hoosier lives. They allow public safety agencies to purchase equipment that support daily operations and enhance their abilities to provide lifesaving responses. This administration is proud to continue to partner with our local safety officials to prioritize the wellbeing of Hoosiers.”Awards were given to 48 recipients in 36 counties. Recipients include local fire departments, emergency medical services, law enforcement and emergency management agencies in all 10 Indiana Department of Homeland Security districts.The focus of the foundation is to support the future of public safety and to provide grant funding to local agencies for critical needs across Indiana. Grants provide up to $4,000. Eligible projects include:Equipping emergency responders with personal protective equipment;Acquiring equipment for use by emergency responders;Providing radios and technology equipment; andTraining for emergency respondersIn 2015, the Indiana Homeland Security Foundation awarded more than $370,000 in grants to aid local public safety agencies. The Indiana Homeland Security Foundation is funded through the purchase of “Secure Indiana” license plates. These funds provide grants to public safety agencies and scholarships to students statewide.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Manic Focus Shares Mix Featuring Unreleased Music, Live Tracks, & So Much More

first_imgBeloved producer Manic Focus continues to make big moves at the end of 2016. Having just recently announced a major tour, Manic is taking things a step further with the release of Minds Mix Volume 1, a collection of old live tracks, unreleased mixes, and some new material all woven together by the man himself.Manic Focus describes the playlist as, “a mix consisting of some of my favorite tunes and unreleased material I’ve been playing for the last few years. Share with your friends and have a happy holidays! Much love!” You can stream the new music in the playlist, embedded below.last_img read more

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Watch The Daze Between Band’s All-Star Tribute To Butch Trucks & Col. Bruce During Jazz Fest 2017

first_imgIf you’ll be in New Orleans For Jazz Fest, don’t miss this year’s Daze Between Band featuring Eric Krasno (Soulive/Lettuce), Dave Schools (Widespread Panic), and Duane Trucks (Widespread Panic), with special guests John Medeski and Tom Hamilton at One Eyed Jacks (5/2) and Marcus King and DeShawn “D’Vibes” Alexander at The Howlin’ Wolf (5/3). For more information, click here. To purchase tickets, click here for 5/2 and here for 5/3. For our full guide to Jazz Fest late nights, click here. Perhaps the most talked-about, star-studded late-night shows during the 2017 Jazz Fest-ivities was the “Daze Between Band.” The mid-week show, led by Eric Krasno (Soulive/Lettuce), took One Eyed Jacks by storm with a jam-packed lineup that included Oteil Burbridge (Dead & Company), Duane Trucks (Widespread Panic), Danny Louis (Gov’t Mule), Scott Metzger (Joe Russo’s Almost Dead), Ike Stubblefield, Lyle Divinsky (The Motet), Nate Werth (Snarky Puppy), Rashawn Ross (Dave Matthews Band), and D Vibes (Eric Krasno Band).Originally, Krasno had planned for the musical direction to honor the memory of the late Butch Trucks, who died early in the year. However, with the passing of the legendary Col. Bruce Hampton on the previous Monday, the show found its emotional impetus significantly magnified. This brought fellow collaborators Jeff Sipe (Aquarium Rescue Unit) and Warren Haynes (Allman Brothers Band) to the scene with heavy hearts, but ready for some serious spiritual musical healing.The night quickly transformed into a tribute to both Butch Trucks and Colonel Bruce Hampton, with the music of the Allman Brothers Band and the Grateful Dead to lead the way. All those in attendance could feel the magnitude of the emotions projected from the stage and returned an inimitable energy to help heal the wounds of those affected by two great losses. On this night, music was the answer.Stranger Than Fiction: The Cosmic Curtain Call Of Col. Bruce HamptonThe first set opened with two Allman Brothers classics, “Trouble No More” and “Dreams” followed by the Dead’s “Mr. Charlie.” From there, Warren Haynes joined the all-star lineup for a ripping performance of “Scarlet Begonias > Fire On The Mountain,” into “Whipping Post” and “Mountain Jam” to close the set. The second set opened with the Dead’s “West LA Fadeaway,” into ABB’s “Hot ‘Lanta.” Oteil Burbridge was certainly within his element, as the former bassist of the Allman Brothers and the current for Dead & Company, leading the way for “Eyes of the World” and “Elizabeth Reed.”“Sugaree” turned into a triumphant “Lovelight,” which, of course, was the song that featured Haynes, Sipe, and Trucks on stage at Col. Bruce’s final performance only a few days prior. Emotions ran high, matching the cosmic certainties that were lifted with the passing of Hampton during his final bow. When the band returned to the stage, turning close to 5 a.m., they closed the show with a “Hey Pocky Way” encore.Setlist: Daze Between Band | One Eyed Jacks | New Orleans, LA | 5/3/17Set One: Trouble No More, Dreams, Mr. Charlie, Scarlet Begonias > Fire On The Mountain, Whipping Post, Mountain JamSet Two: West LA Fadeaway, Hot ‘Lanta, Eyes Of The World, Elizabeth Reed, Sugaree, LovelightEncore: Hey Pocky WayVideographer John Peckham was on site with a multi-cam setup, plugged into the soundboard. You can enjoy the full performance below:Trouble No More, Dreams, Mr. Charlie, Scarlett Begonias, Fire On The MountainWhipping Post, Mountain Jam, West LA Fadeaway, Hot ‘Lanta, Eyes Of The World, Elizabeth Reed, Sugaree, Lovelight, Hey Pocky WayYou can also enjoy the full show below with audio provided by nolamule:last_img read more

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Design students bridge gaps

first_imgOver fall break, 14 design students attempted to bridge the gap between Notre Dame and the South Bend community through a design blitz led by John Bielenberg, founder of the design service program Project M. Bielenberg is a pioneer of the “thinking wrong” approach to design, which involves drawing inspiration for projects in unconventional ways, and Project M implements design projects conceived through this method to address social problems. Senior industrial design major Alisa Rantanen said students followed the thinking wrong approach in conceiving of their projects, starting with brainstorming words. “It started with brainstorming and mind-mapping random words, not even design related,” Rantanen said. “Each group was given a prompt. So my group was given ‘Rick James’ and ‘chalk,’ and all in one day we were told, ‘Go make a project based on that.’” Three different projects emerged from the brainstorming session: chalk talk, PROJECTiiON and IN South Bend. Rantanen said her group worked on chalk talk and painted a chalkboard wall in downtown South Bend so people could share their thoughts with the community. “It’s a way to give them a voice where otherwise many people wouldn’t be heard,” she said. “The next phase is to bring it to Notre Dame.” The prompts on the wall say “I am,” “I think,” “I feel” and “I dream,” Rantanen said. Industrial design graduate student Kevin Melchiorri said PROJECTiiON stands for “Projecting Interactive Images On Neighborhoods.” The project’s goal is to project meaningful images on visible buildings in downtown South Bend at night, he said. “This process creates a beacon that invites, unites and empowers viewers through selected content,” Melchiorri said. PROJECTiiON also works with chalk talk to project images of the chalk wall, Melchiorri said. “We are currently collaborating with chalk talk and have plans to create a series of projects in the future that involve video games, movies, lighting, restaurant and local business promotion and kinetic energy from the audience’s physical participation,” he said. IN South Bend is an initiative to get a trolley to run from Main Circle to downtown South Bend to encourage more students to visit. Junior graphic design major Jeff McLean said the idea for the project was based on the phrase “insane clown posse struggle bus.” “We used this to drive our concepts around creating an atmosphere of fun, new experiences and excitement around student trips downtown,” McLean said. “An important component of doing this effectively was to make going downtown a tangibly branded experience for students.” To promote the project, McLean said his group built a “bus” out of PVC pipe and tied balloons to it. They filmed themselves traveling downtown, leaving a balloon at each place they stopped. The group then posted the video online and asked viewers to sign a petition to make the bus a reality, he said. Senior industrial design major Bobby Reichle, a part of the group that developed IN South Bend, said he hopes the project will draw more students downtown because the area has a lot to offer. “For me, my favorite place in South Bend is the Main Street Coffee House, and no one knows it exists,” Reichle said. “I want people to move beyond the cookie-cutter stores of Eddy Street and actually see the local character of downtown South Bend. There is actually some worthwhile stuff there.” Senior industrial design major Airi Kobayashi said the design blitz forced the students to interact with South Bend in a new way and to talk to community members to learn more about the area. “We realized how much South Bend has more to offer than we thought there was and how much of a disconnect there was from the Notre Dame community to South Bend,” Kobayashi said. The blitz’s format and short time limit also enabled the students to put design skills they learned in the classroom to practical use, Rantanen said. “I knew this was going to be a super-creative, super-intense process, and I wanted to get … the messier side of actually making things real,” she said. Rantanen said seeing her project come alive was one of the best parts of the blitz. “This was a great opportunity to do something and see the direct impact,” she said. “Our chalk wall – less than 24 hours later, people had written all over it, so it was really rewarding to have that immediate impact.” Contact Tori Roeck at [email protected]last_img read more

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Flavor of Georgia 2014

first_imgGeorgia entrepreneurs and chefs only have a few weeks left if they want to participate in the 2014 Flavor of Georgia Food Product Contest. The contest’s organizers are still looking for great jams, confections, barbecue sauces, cheeses, popsicles, granolas, soups and any other products that represent the future of Georgia’s storied culinary heritage. The contest — sponsored by the University of Georgia Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development — helps food entrepreneurs expand the market for their products and gain notoriety for their companies. “Flavor of Georgia is a unique opportunity for entrepreneurs to gain publicity and exposure for their products,” said Sharon P. Kane, food business development specialist with the UGA center. “It’s also a chance for them to network with other food entrepreneurs and industry experts.” More than 90 percent of the finalists in the 2013 Flavor of Georgia Contest reported increased interest in their products through their experience with the Flavor of Georgia contest. Three out of four finalists saw an increased interest in their products following the contest, and many others benefitted from increased sales, profits, publicity and website traffic. Some even indicated an increase in full and part time employees. A follow up survey found that finalists saw on average a 27 percent increase in their revenues in the six months following the contest. “Winning the grand prize has given Chocolate South, which has now been open for 15 months, real gravitas and has let everyone know that we are serious about our chocolates and flavor profiles,” said Amy Stankus, who won the 2013 grand prize with Chocolate South’s Peach Tea Bon-Bon. “Our retail and wholesale business is growing rapidly, and I give the Flavor of Georgia contest much credit for showcasing our chocolates.” Finalists in the 2014 Flavor of Georgia Food Product Contest will be invited to participate in the Governor’s Agricultural Awareness Day in March as well as in expositions at the Buford Highway Farmers Market, Georgia National Fair and the Serenbe May Day Festival. Winners will be given rights to use the Flavor Georgia logo on product labels and a free, silver-level membership in the Georgia Department of Agriculture’s Georgia Grown program. Registration is now open and will run through Feb.7, 2014. Finalists will be invited to take part in a final judging and public tasting March 17-18, in Atlanta, Ga. Contestants can submit products that are already commercially available or foods that are in the prototype stage. There is not a limit on the number of products that an individual can submit. Product categories include: barbecue sauces; beverages; jams and jellies; sauces and condiments; confections; meat and seafood products; dairy products; snack foods; and miscellaneous products. A panel of judges — made up of food marketing experts, grocery buyers, chefs and Georgia agricultural experts — will judge each product based on flavor, Georgia theme, unique or innovative qualities, commercial appeal, potential market volume and use of locally, sourced products. More information about the contest and registration information is available online at www.flavorofgeorgia.caes.uga.edu or by calling (706) 583-0347. The cost to enter is $50 per product if the contestant uses the competition website. Registration costs $75 per product if you register by mail.last_img read more

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Stocks, gold bars among unclaimed property turned over to the state of Vermont

first_imgIt’s the smiling face of Walt Disney that dominates the stock certificate recently turned over to the Unclaimed Property Division of the Vermont State Treasurer’s Office. The certificate is for 147 shares of stock in the Walt Disney Company. The Treasurer’s Office hopes to locate the Vermonter who is the rightful owner of this financial property. If they do, the person will be smiling right along with Walt. The stock is valued at around $5,000.There’s approximately $47 million in unclaimed financial property currently in the State’s unclaimed property fund. In the past year, the Treasurer’s Office has received more than $8 million in new financial property ─ including stocks valued at close to a million dollars. The Unclaimed Property Law directs the Treasurer’s Office to sell all abandoned stock within one year of receipt if the property is not claimed by the rightful owner. The proceeds of the sale are placed in the unclaimed property fund and may then be claimed by the owner or heirs. A sale of stock is scheduled for the end of May.“We sell the stock for the prevailing price at the time of the sale,” explained State Treasurer Jeb Spaulding. “Our goal is to locate the owners of unclaimed property as quickly as we can. Property is continuously received by my office and I urge Vermonters to go on-line and check once a year to see if we are holding any financial property for them.”Financial property becomes “unclaimed” after a business or non-profit entity loses contact with a customer over a period of years. The property is sent to the Treasurer’s Office to protect the funds, and centralize efforts to locate the property owners. Some of the most unique items turned over to the office come from safe deposit boxes. Numbered among these unique items include jewelry, gold bars, a repair bill for someone’s sports car, a pair of underwear, and a Cadbury Egg.A record number of Vermonters are checking for unclaimed property. From July 1, 2009 through May 1, 2010 there were 12,452 claims paid with a value of approximately $4.2 million. That is the greatest number of annual claims paid in the history of Vermont’s unclaimed property program.“It’s been great to see more people claiming their property, even the smaller amounts. This fiscal year, the average claim amount was $377. Many people are taking advantage of our express claim process for claims that are $200 or less. Through express claims, Vermonters have less paperwork to complete and they can usually receive their money within two weeks,” Spaulding said.Common types of unclaimed property include old bank accounts; uncashed paychecks; money orders; service deposits; estates; insurance policies; safe deposit box contents; and stocks, bonds and dividends. There is no time limit on filing a claim, nor is there any charge for claiming property through the Treasurer’s Office.Vermonters can check for property by going on-line to www.MissingMoney.Vermont.gov(link is external). There also is a link on the Treasurer’s Office site to a national searchable database of unclaimed property. People may contact Vermont’s Unclaimed Property Division by calling (802) 828-2407 or toll-free in Vermont at 1-800-642-3191.Source: Vermont Treasurer. 5.19.2010last_img read more

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Southcom Commander Stresses Need for Collaboration against Threat Networks

first_imgBy Shannon Collins, DoD News, Defense Media Activity December 13, 2016 Trust, collaboration and innovation are necessary in fighting threat networks and their finances, the commander of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) said on December 7th in opening remarks for the 15th Caribbean Nations Security Conference in San Juan, Puerto Rico. U.S. Navy Admiral Kurt W.Tidd, addressed some 120 leaders and delegates from 22 nations –representatives of five nations attended as observers — who met to examinethreats to Caribbean stability and evaluate ideas to improve collaboration insupport of regional security. The two-day event featureddiscussions about transnational threat networks, informational sharing,regional security strategies, security synchronization, U.S. support tosecurity in the Caribbean, disaster relief and multinational capacity-buildingexercises. Threat Networks “Threat networks – and thegrowing illegal economies that support them – undercut the interests of manyacross multiple countries and continents,” Adm. Tidd said. Many threat networks preyon citizens who are disadvantaged and disaffected, the admiral noted. “Manyglamorize violence and use it as a tool to intimidate local populations andinspire legions,” Adm. Tidd said. “And from criminal gangs to extremist groupslike [the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant], many networks exploit socialmedia and popular culture using slick, high-quality videos and music thatpromote killing, intimidation and a code of silence. Many more have local‘franchises’ that spread like viruses through our communities.” These networks are woveninto the fabric of the collective environments of the nations participating inthe conference and pose a challenge to collective security, the SOUTHCOMcommander said. Combating them requires collaboration in law enforcement,diplomacy intelligence and with military partners across the region. Combating Threats Defeating the threatnetworks requires out-adapting them and seeking out new technology andinnovation, Adm. Tidd told the conferees. “We must exploit newtechnologies and not be afraid to challenge old ways of doing business,” hesaid. “We must seek out and leverage the expertise of civil society, academia,and the private sector, who can bring fresh perspective, unique skill sets andinnovative solutions to bear on complex challenges. And we must hone the skillsand capabilities our forces need to succeed in a transformed securityenvironment.” The conference took place less than two months after the region’s governments signed a joint action statement on security cooperation following a dialogue on Caribbean-U.S. security cooperation in Washington. Since 2010, the United States has partnered with Caribbean nations to support the Caribbean Basin Security Initiative, part of an integrated regional effort to reduce illicit trafficking, increase public safety and security, and promote social justice. The United States has committed $437 million in funding to the initiative since its inception. The Caribbean NationsSecurity Conference is sponsored annually by SOUTHCOM, the U.S. Department ofDefense’s unified command responsible for U.S. military operations and securitycooperation in the Caribbean, Central America, and South America.last_img read more

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Good Governance: 9 Leadership Challenges

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The board of the future will need the strength to overcome these.by: Michael Daigneault, CCDAt Quantum Governance, we’ve been taking a look at what the credit union board of the future will look like and, almost more importantly, the challenges it will face. Ultimately, we have identified nine key challenges that are already (or will be) confronting your leadership.1.       The Composition Challenge. Gone are the days when your credit union can simply rely on a nice cross section of its membership to fill open slots on its board. The most progressive boards today are actively recruiting the talent they need; identifying the skill sets that deliver the talent, connections and expertise they need on the board; and then inviting those individuals to become members of the credit union.2.       The Technology Challenge.  The rate of technology is changing at lightening speed. I don’t have to tell you that. But here’s the thing. It’s changing at a faster rate than anything else we’ve ever seen. Faster than political change, business change and even social change in our world. Is your board ready? Is the credit union?3.       The Community Challenge. The very notion of community is being altered by technology. Community is ceasing to be largely defined by geography and more often it’s defined as a sense of belonging. How does that impact your “community” credit union? Indeed, as a credit union member myself, I haven’t set foot in a local branch for more than a decade. What does that mean for your business? Is your board discussing the impact of this from a strategic point of view? continue reading »last_img read more

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Binghamton High School serves community with 25th annual Thanksgiving dinner

first_imgSteve Giannini, Coordinator of the dinner, said, “We just kept running them [dinners] to the door. We had people driving up in the back, walking up in front, and we kept everyone socially distanced so the line looked even longer than it was.” The school celebrated the 25th Annual Community Thanksgiving Dinner Thursday, and even with COVID-19 restrictions, organizers said it was a hit. Students say they were stunned by the number of people that turned out to the dinner, and were happy they could fill a large need. “It went really fast, I could not believe the number of people that were here,” Giannini said. Student volunteers prepared and handed out 500 Thanksgiving dinners for those staying in for the holiday. Organizers say the 500 meals only took a little over an hour to give oout completely. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — Binghamton High School continued a tradition with the community this Thanksgiving, safely serving community members Thanksgiving meals. last_img read more

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