Category: fofabvlic

Church of England investment arm trebles capital in two decades

first_imgChurch of England investment arm trebles capital in two decades Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Anglican Communion Tags Submit a Press Release Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Anglican Communion News Service] The Church of England’s investment arm, the Church Commissioners, has almost trebled the value of its investment fund over a 20-year period, it announced this week. The value of the Commissioners’ investment fund has grown from £2.4 billion at the start of 1995, to £7.00bn at the end of 2015; producing a return of 8.2 per cent last year.The history of the Church Commissioners dates back, in some ways to before Henry VIII’s split with Rome. Clergy in England were not paid a stipend but were given the living – the right to income earned from the parish estates. This income was taxed by Church authorities with ten per cent being sent to Rome. After the Reformation, this went instead to the Crown.As the Church grew, so did the number of parishes; but many clergy found that their parish wasn’t wealthy enough to give them a living. In response, in 1704, Queen Anne established the snappily titled “Governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of Poor Clergy” with responsibility for ensuring that the taxes received from the wealthier parishes was used to pay a living for clergy in the poorer ones.Rather than directly fund stipends; the money was used to purchase land from which a living could be earned; but some clergy chose to invest the funds with the Governors of the Bounty rather than purchase land; and this is how the investment fund began.Over the years, Queen Anne’s Bounty received additional sources of income – including the “profits” from vacant parishes and from the estates of dignitaries – bishops and deans. The latter was the responsibility of the Ecclesiastical and Church Estates Commissioners for England – a body established to review the revenues of the Church and to manage the structure of dioceses, cathedral posts, and parishes.The two bodies were merged in 1948 to form the Church Commissioners for England – a body established by the UK Parliament. The Church Commissioners remain accountable to Parliament and every six-weeks-or-so, a Commissioner – currently Caroline Spelman – has to answer questions in the House of Commons’ chamber from fellow MPs about the work of the Commission.Their responsibilities have changed over the years; but the Commissioners are still responsible for drawing up and approving schemes for opening and closing churches and changing parish boundaries; and are responsible in law for funding certain church posts – including diocesan bishops’ office and working costs; cathedral clergy; and a significant amount in clergy pensions.Generally, the Commissioners do not spend their capital –capital gains are re-invested, which means that the fund – which is spread amongst a range of investments from stocks and shares to shopping centres and forests – continues to grow.After spending their income on their core responsibilities, they distribute their surplus to fund the mission and ministry of the Church of England in more discretionary ways. For many years they have continued their historic role of supporting the work of the Church in deprived areas through grants to dioceses; based on assessments of poverty and need.But in recent years they have become more strategic and provided funds for church growth initiatives.These include the Growing Younger initiative of the Diocese of Birmingham. The commissioners supplemented the diocese’s own funding of £1.7 million with a £1 million strategic development grant to support engagement with children, young people and families in a bid to welcome 2,000 new regular worshippers to join churches around Birmingham over five years.Part of the initiative saw the launch of St Luke’s, Gas Street – a contemporary city centre church focused on young adults in their 20s and 30s. The church has now grown to 300 members and moved into a converted warehouse in the city centre, aiming to engage with students and young adults and bring ‘light for the city’.Another church growth scheme supported by the Commissioners is the appointment of a pioneer minister for the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford, east London; on a site served by both the Diocese of London and the Diocese of Chelmsford.Home to the 2012 London Olympic Games, residents from the five surrounding London boroughs began moving into what had been the athletes’ village in 2014. The area and local community were unknown to them, resulting in little social cohesion and no obvious sense of community. The Church appointed the Revd Annie McTighe as pioneer minister to the village in the summer of 2014 with the help of a grant from the Commissioner, with the role of helping the development of a community.When she first arrived in June 2014, there were just 1,000 people living on the site. Now there are in excess of 7,000 residents. “It was a very quiet little hamlet and now it is becoming a blustering little community – a town with lots of life, lots of activity, going on here,” she said.“Having the title ‘pioneer’ has freed me up and it has freed the community up. I think if I came here and said I was the vicar it would go into that old forms and stereotypes in people’s minds.” She said that being introduced as a pioneer means that people think of her role as “fresh, different, and unusual” and has helped to open doors.Commenting on last year’s financial results, which were unveiled yesterday, the secretary of the Church Commissioners, Andrew Brown, congratulated the investment team for delivering a return in excess of eight per cent. “Without this leadership and good stewardship it would not be possible to support the Church as we do,” he said. “But we must not forget the generous support from parishes, dioceses and cathedrals which provide around three quarters of the Church’s annual spending on ministry and mission.”Click here for the Church Commissioners’ full annual report for 2015 (pdf). Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By Gavin Drake Posted Jun 17, 2016 Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more

Read More

Join our Superbru Fantasy League and Match Predictor games

first_imgThursday Sep 17, 2015 Join our Superbru Fantasy League and Match Predictor games For this year’s Rugby World Cup we’re running TWO picking games with Superbru – both the traditional match Predictor, and then a Fantasy League too. You can enter both, just for fun and to take on friends, colleagues and thousands of other rugby fans for free.Fantasy ~ Full featured fantasy gameSelect a squad of 23 real world players, then pick a starting XV for each round. Manage your squad carefully with limited transfers and team limits. JOIN NOW Predictor ~ The famous tipping game Predict the winning team and margin of victory for every match in the world’s biggest rugby prediction game. JOIN NOWADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Rugby World Cup Related Articles 25 WEEKS AGO If you can get your head around it, these… 47 WEEKS AGO You’ve never seen any Rugby World Cup drop… 49 WEEKS AGO TOP 10: Rugby World Cup 2015 was filled with… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsWrinkle Remedy Stuns TV Judges: Forget Surgery, Do This Once DailySmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Read More

Conducting a Successful Major Gifts and Planned Giving Program: A Comprehensive Guide and Resource (Dove on Fund Raising)

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Conducting a Successful Major Gifts and Planned Giving Program: A Comprehensive Guide and Resource (Dove on Fund Raising) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  14 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 27 October 2007 | Newslast_img read more

Read More

Minister to “keep door open” for teacher talks

first_img TAGSASTIDepartment of EducationDon RyanDonncha Ó TreasaigheducationEducation Minister Jan O’SullivanGaelcholaiste LuimnighJunior CertlimerickTUI Students in Limerick colleges to benefit from more than €1.5M funding to assist with online learning NewsMinister to “keep door open” for teacher talksBy John Keogh – November 20, 2014 670 Education and Training Board serves up award winning standards Facebook Jan O’Sullivan, the Limerick minister who will be involved in the launch of the new energuy initiative “Let’s Conserve Energy Together Better.”Minister Jan O’SullivanEDUCATION Minister Jan O’Sullivan says she believes the package offered to second-level teaching unions last week has the capacity to resolve the long-running dispute regarding Junior Cert reforms.The Minister made her comments after a meeting with both the ASTI and the TUI yesterday (Wednesday, November 19).Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “I want to maintain a dialogue with second-level teaching unions in relation to junior cycle reform. While I am disappointed at both unions’ decision to take strike action on the 2nd December I will keep my door open for talks in the coming weeks.“There is a significant offer available to both teaching unions that retains State certification, introduces reform and gives a better learning experience to students. I sincerely believe that this offer will in the end of the day form the basis of an agreement and the sooner we engage around that compromise the better,” explained Minister O’Sullivan.However, she added that while she has “moved significantly”, it appears that both teachers’ unions “remain resistant to any classroom-based assessment by the teacher contributing to junior cycle marks”.Minister O’Sullivan continued: “Classroom assessment is an important element of junior cycle reform. It provides students with the route to measure important skills such as teamwork, problem solving and communication. I believe that teachers should be involved in that assessment.”Meanwhile, Gaelcholáiste Luimnigh principal Donncha Ó Treasaigh believes that there is “no appetite” among teachers for strike action.Mr Ó Treasaigh said he is in favour of the reforms currently proposed and that he is “against strike action as it would lead to major inconvenience for both parents and pupils”.He added that school-based assessment “encourages the teaching of a broader range of skills and means that a much more rounded picture emerges of each young person’s capabilities and successes”.Don Ryan, TUI (Teachers’ Union of Ireland) representative for Limerick City, Clare and North Tipperary, said that the TUI and ASTI welcomed the Department of Education’s amendments to the initial proposals but insisted that “issues of critical importance were not resolved”.According to Mr Ryan, teachers are in favour of reforming the Junior Cert, “but serious objections and concerns about aspects of the new programme remain” that he says are unacceptable.Some 88 per cent of TUI members voted in favour of industrial action at a meeting last week.Previous proposals had suggested that teachers would be responsible for marking 100 per cent of a student’s work throughout the junior cycle, but Minister O’Sullivan has now proposed that 60 per cent of marks should be allocated on the basis of an exam at the end of third year, which would be externally marked. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick social entrepreneurs honoured for their work in response to covid-19 WhatsApp Advertisementcenter_img Print Changes to the Student Support Scheme for people living in Direct Provision Limerick schools urged to get involved in STEM challenge Twitter Linkedin Email Previous articleThe road to rehabilitation at Limerick PrisonNext articleA tale of two communities John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Consultation process on a new action plan for apprenticeship launchedlast_img read more

Read More

5 Limerick students claim prizes at National Career Skills Awards 2018

first_imgAdvertisement Consultation process on a new action plan for apprenticeship launched Limerick social entrepreneurs honoured for their work in response to covid-19 WhatsApp Limerick schools urged to get involved in STEM challenge RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGSAwardsCareereducationnational career skills competitionschool Twitter Students in Limerick colleges to benefit from more than €1.5M funding to assist with online learning Linkedincenter_img Email Education and Training Board serves up award winning standards Facebook Changes to the Student Support Scheme for people living in Direct Provision NewsEducation5 Limerick students claim prizes at National Career Skills Awards 2018By Cian Reinhardt – May 15, 2018 1385 Print Previous articleLimerick experienced a significant rise in burglaries last yearNext articleThe Mustard Seed in Ballingarry Cian Reinhardthttp://www.limerickpost.ieJournalist & Digital Media Coordinator. Covering human interest and social issues as well as creating digital content to accompany news stories. [email protected] Megan, Gaelcholáiste Liumnigh; Ellen Caulfield, McDonald’s Restaurants of Ireland; Eimear Sinnott, Careers Portal; Laszloi, Limerick College of Further Education.The winners of the 2018 National Careers Skills Competition have been announced, with five students from Limerick receiving awards.In the Irish Category, two students from Gaelcholáiste Luimnigh were acknowledged for their submissions after work experience in veterinary medicine. Megan Ní Chróinín was awarded third-prize for her work and Enya Harrington was highly commended.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Students of Limerick College of Further Education received three acknowledgements in the Adult Learner Category. Laszlo Szlatki was awarded fourth-prize for his work in software development, while Nathan O’Connor and Shane Healy were both commended for their work experience as a video game reviewer and broadcast journalist respectively.The National Career Skill Awards recognise students who complete a career investigation in their chosen area of interest.Each student must be able to demonstrate their understanding of a career, the educational pathways that lead to it, the most relevant knowledge requirements needed, and the most important career skills/transferable skills needed to be successful in this career.  They must then be able to explain which skills they developed during their work experience and indicate how their work experience has influenced their career and educational choices. Participation in the competition facilitates a rich understanding of a particular occupation and more importantly the career skills needed to support it.Presentations were made by Minister of State at the Department of Education and Skills with special responsibility for Higher Education, Mary Mitchell O’Connor TD at a ceremony at the Clock Tower at the Department of Education.The National Careers Skills Competition is run by www.careersportal.ie and sponsored by McDonald’s.Read more Education news in the Limerick Post Education section.last_img read more

Read More

Major Donegal road projects shelved due to Government cuts

first_imgNewsx Adverts WhatsApp Google+ Facebook Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR HSE warns of ‘widespread cancellations’ of appointments next week WhatsApp Pinterest Dail to vote later on extending emergency Covid powers PSNI and Gardai urged to investigate Adams’ claims he sheltered on-the-run suspect in Donegal Donegal will be one of the worst affected counties in the country by today’s confirmation that work on all major new road projects is being suspended because of spending cutbacks.Roads projects affected in Donegal include the N56 Mountcharles to Inver Road which was to comprise of 4.9 Killometeres of new road eliminateing a number of dangerous bends.Also shelved is the proposed N56 Dungloe to Glenties project, only in March funding was approved for this with a council meeting in Lifford told how it would open up the west of Donegal to the rest of Ireland.In terms of National Primary Routes – plans to upgrade the N14 Lifford to Letterkenny Road will not now go ahead as scheduled – this despite it being one of the most dangerous stretches in the country and seen as key in tying in with the proposed A5 upgrade in the North.No work will take place on the N15 Lifford to Twin Towns Stretch, the Ballybofey  / Stranorlar by-pass is further long fingered while improvements to the N15 Bundoran to Sligo road are also off the agenda.The decision to shelve these projects, along with 4 others across the country, was taken by the NRA at the direction of Transport Minister – Leo Varadkarcenter_img Google+ Previous articleDonegal Fianna Fail Deputy would back Gay Byrne’s Aras bidNext articleSoccer – Healy pleased with Harps win News Highland Dail hears questions over design, funding and operation of Mica redress scheme By News Highland – August 9, 2011 Man arrested in Derry on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences released Facebook Major Donegal road projects shelved due to Government cuts Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Twitter Pinterestlast_img read more

Read More

RHI inquiry finds not evidence of corrupt of malicious activity

first_img Previous articleMasses cancelled in Derry DioceseNext articleAll driving tests suspended until March 29th News Highland RHI inquiry finds not evidence of corrupt of malicious activity Facebook Twitter Google+ WhatsApp Homepage BannerNews Pinterest By News Highland – March 13, 2020 Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Facebook Google+center_img Twitter News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows DL Debate – 24/05/21 A public inquiry into Northern Ireland’s botched green energy scheme has found no evidence of corrupt or malicious activity.But it criticises first minister Arlene Foster for signing off on the project in 2012 – when she was energy minister – saying it should never have happened.It led to a huge falling out between powersharing partners the DUP and Sinn Fein. WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

Read More

Australia: Keel Laid for Sixth Cape Class Patrol Boat

first_img View post tag: Naval View post tag: Patrol Australian Minister for Immigration and Border Protection, Scott Morrison MP, participated in a keel laying ceremony on March 31st for the sixth Cape Class Patrol Boat being manufactured at Austal’s Henderson shipyard in Western Australia. Back to overview,Home naval-today Australia: Keel Laid for Sixth Cape Class Patrol Boat View post tag: Laid The vessel, Cape Leveque, is the sixth of eight Cape Class Patrol Boats being built by Austal for the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service under a design, construct and in-service support contract valued at approximately $330 million.The first-in-class Cape Class Patrol Boat, Cape St George, was delivered to the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service in April 2013. A second vessel, the Cape Byron, is undergoing sea trials and is expected to be delivered in the next two months. All eight vessels are on track to be delivered by August 2015, in line with the contract.The keel laying ceremony is a time honoured shipbuilding tradition where three specially minted coins are placed under a keel block as a symbol of good fortune and to bless the ship. These coins will be removed just prior to the patrol boat’s launch.The three coins for the Cape Leveque keel laying ceremony were placed by Minister Morrison; Austal Chairman John Rothwell AO; and Customs and Border Protection Regional Commander WA Rod O’Donnell.At the ceremony Minister Morrison commended Austal for achieving the project to date on time and on budget.“The reason that we’re doing this here is not through any act of generosity to Austal; we’re doing it because they know how to do a good job,” he said.“They’re a competitive outfit that knows about product and knows about service, and they know about partnership in working together with government to deliver up these major programs.”Austal Chief Executive Officer Andrew Bellamy said the Cape Class contract had cemented Austal’s position as global defence prime contractor and it was pleasing to be able to demonstrate the capability of both Austal and its aluminium vessels to Australia’s Minister for Immigration and Border Protection and to Prime Minister Tony Abbott when he introduced the Cape St George into service in Darwin in October 2013.“At present our shipbuilding yard at Henderson is at full Cape Class production levels,” Mr Bellamy said.“Through superior design and skilled workmanship we are providing vessels on time and within budget, and, according to feedback from Customs and Border Protection, that class of vessel is exceeding their high operational expectations.“In addition, the construction of the Cape Class vessels underpins both Austal’s domestic/export demand model for Australian shipbuilding and the 500 skilled employees at our Henderson operation.”As part of the $330 million contract, Austal will also perform ongoing in-service support for the Cape Class fleet over at least eight years, encompassing a full range of intermediate and depot level maintenance activities, valued at a minimum of $50 million.The Cape Class Patrol Boats have been designed and constructed to provide greater range, endurance and flexibility, as well as enhanced capability to operate in more severe sea conditions, than the current Customs and Border Protection Bay Class fleet and the Royal Australian Navy Armidale Class fleet.Each of the vessels is named after a cape from each state and territory.In addition to its role as a defence prime contractor in Australia, Austal is also prime contractor for two major US defence projects – the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) and the Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) – for the United States Navy.Austal has manufactured and delivered 69 defence vessels, including 41 boats for other Australian agencies.[mappress]Press Release, April 2, 2014; Image: Austal Share this article View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Sixth View post tag: Navy Industry news April 2, 2014 View post tag: Cape View post tag: KEEL View post tag: class View post tag: Boat Australia: Keel Laid for Sixth Cape Class Patrol Boatlast_img read more

Read More

WORTH REPEATING: Classykvillepolitics Enlightens CCO Readers of Indiana Public Access Counselor Determination.

first_img Classykvillepolitics Enlightens CCO Readers of Indiana Public Access Counselor Determination.Sorry I am late to the game, but I’ve been on the road again.As I have previously indicated, many of the local issues can and should be considered for submission to the Indiana Public Access Counselor for determination. This accomplishes a number of things that are critical for continued resolution.The Public Access Counselor provides advice and assistance concerning Indiana’s public access laws, specifically the Access to Public Records Act (APRA) and the Open Door Law (ODL)to members of the public and government officials and employees.First, aspects of issues that are considered by the Indiana Public Access Counselor do have the capability of setting binding precedent for issues locallySecond, if a local arm of government is in violation of any sections of the Indiana Code or Indiana Administrative Code, there are financial penalties (which can be significant) that can be levied against a municipality.Finally, issues submitted to the Indiana Public Access Counselor do not require an attorney or elected official to seek determination. In fact, many issues submitted to the Indiana Public Access Counselor for advice come from private citizens who feel they have been denied appropriate access to public records. These citizen violation concerns usually cover two aspects of public records: Access to Public Records Act and the Open Door Law.The important thoughts here are that the Indiana Public Access Counselor interprets the issues and approaches it two ways. If a municipality, employee, or citizen submits a formal complaint, the Indiana Public Access Counselor will issue an “Advisory Opinion” per Indiana Code 5-14-5. For cases where the issue is not so much as a complaint as a request for “clarification”, there will be an “Informal Opinion” released to assist in guidance.In the case at hand today, we have been having a long-term discussion of the Evansville Brownfield and the aspect of their audits and whether the public has a right to see them. I did some research into this, and found something not only enlightening, the sole case from the Indiana Public Access Counselor was a case involving the Evansville Brownfield back in 2009.In June of 2009 the Indiana Public Access Counselor released an Advisory Opinion regarding Formal Complaint 09-FC-126 regarding the “Alleged Violation of the Open Door Law by the Evansville Brownfield’s Corporation” which was as follows:Alleged that the Corporation violated the ODL by declining to provide notice of its meetingsAlleged a citizen telephoned the office and inquired about the next meeting date and time which was not givenAlleged that the Corporation was in violation of the ODL because the Corporation’s board makes decisions at its meetings about the use of public funds.http://www.in.gov/pac/advisory/files/formal_opinion_09-FC-126.pdf(Do I have your attention now?))The Evansville Brownfield’s responded with the following:Evansville Brownfield’s contended it is not a public agency and is therefore not subject to the ODL.Evansville Brownfield’s is a non-profit corporation organized on March 24,2003.Evansville Brownfield’s is controlled by a five-member Board, some members of which are also public officials.Evansville Brownfield’s is a tax exempt entity, files IRS Form 990,maintains a separate bank account, approves its own contracts, maintains its own insurance, and maintains its own records.Evansville Brownfield’s contended it is not subject to audit by the Indiana State Board of Accounts (“SBOA”) that is required by statute, rule or regulation but does agree contractually to be subject to an audit.As of 2009, Evansville Brownfield’s has not been audited by the SBOA.Evansville Brownfield’s contended that its arrangement is similar to a fee-for-services agreement and as such it is not subject to the ODL.After considering all this in detail, the Indiana Public Access Counselor declared as follows:Because Evansville Brownfield is a non-profit corporation not formed by statute, ordinance or executive order, most of the entity types listed in IC § 5-14-1.5-2(a) are not applicable.The Indiana Public Access Counselor analysis turned to the one provision which may apply, IC § 5-14-1.5-2(a)(3)(B). It is often the case that a non-profit corporation is also considered a public agency for the purposes of the ODL because it is subject to SBOA audit and the audit is required by statute, rule or regulation.The complaint from 2009 indicated the belief that the Evansville Brownfield was a public agency because at its meetings the Board makes decisions regarding the use of public funds. That the Board may make decisions regarding its use of public funds, though, is not determinative on the issue. The question is whether the Evansville Brownfield is subject to audit by the SBOA and whether that audit is required by statute, rule, or regulation.Evansville Brownfield indicate in 2009 that it contractually agreed to be subjected to audit by the SBOA. Contractual obligation to an SBOA audit, though, is not the same as an audit required by statute, rule, or regulation. The Indiana Public Access Counselor found no statute, rule, or regulation requiring the Evansville Brownfield to be subjected to an SBOA audit. Rather, as the Evansville Brownfield pointed out, its arrangement is more like a fee-for-services arrangement as contemplated in I.C. § 5-14-1.5-2.1 and Perry County Development Corporation v. Kempf, 712 N.E.2d 1020 (Ind. Ct. App. 1999).The Kempf court said that an entity (here, a non-profit corporation) “does not become a ‘public agency,’ thus coming within the purview of the statutes in question, by contractually agreeing to submit to an audit. . . Rather, an entity is ‘subject to’ those procedures only if compelled to submit by statue, rule, or regulation.”Id. at 1025.The Indiana Public Access Counselor in 2009 decided that the facts were similar to those in Kempf. Evansville Brownfield contended the continued funding of grants is dependent on the continued performance under the applicable statutes. If Evansville Brownfield failed to perform as required, Evansville Brownfield would be required to return the money. As was the case in Kempf, “[t]he fact that said funds were derived from public sources does not transform [the entity] into a public agency.”In conclusion, in 2009 the Indiana Public Access Counselor issued the opinion that the Evansville Brownfield’s was not covered by the Indiana Open Door Law.OK, now having written all that (I love legal work), I pose the following:With the recent change by the Evansville City Council and the Department of Metropolitan Development in how the Evansville Brownfield operates, I would submit that the time is VERY ripe for a citizen to submit a complaint and request to the Indiana Public Access Counselor seeking clarification to the 2009 decision regarding Formal Complaint 09-FC-126 – “Alleged Violation of the Open Door Law by the Evansville Brownfield’s Corporation”The reason I focus on this is the section of law in I.C. § 5-14-1.5-2.1 regarding the declaration of what constitutes a “public agency”, and I specifically refer to section (5) in that section of the Indiana Code, which states“Any advisory commission, committee, or body created by statute, ordinance, or executive order to advise the governing body of a public agency”Would anybody agree that the ordinance from the Evansville City Council regarding the operation of the Evansville Brownfield’s has changed from 2009, and since they are now covered by a local “ordinance” that would suffice to place them under the coverage of being declared a “public agency”I have to opine that the circumstances have changed greatly regarding the makeup and authority of the Evansville Brownfield’s, and as such they may now be declared as a “public agency” as set out in I.C. § 5-14-1.5-2.1Anybody want help submitting the request to the Indiana Public Access Counselor?EDITORS FOOTNOTE: We are asking our readers to “like page” on Facebook and encourage friends and family to do so, as well?If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us City-County [email protected] “Readers Poll” question is: Do you feel that “Keep Evansville Beautiful” should take a more active role in keeping political signs off the public right a way?Copyright 2015 City County Observer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributedFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Read More

Decoration at a touch-screen

first_imgDesigning a personalised celebration cake has now been made easier for consumers with the introduction of Kluman & Balter’s (Waltham Cross) next generation of in-store high-tech systems. The new photo-decoration system allows consumers to input their choices at a free-standing compact console, via an interactive touch-screen display. They are guided through a series of steps to create the final design, which is printed on edible sugar paper at the bakery counter.“All the retailer needs is a small space for our design console. We supply the cakes, paper, ink, printer and decorations,” says Kluman & Balter MD Danny Kluman.Customers can even transfer images from their digital camera, mobile phone or CD for a highly personalised finish, although standard designs are also available.last_img read more

Read More