Category: pvdhotuv

Comment: Unfair Stereotypes for Idea Idols

first_imgIt saddened me to read the recent editorial, ‘Idea Idle’, as I feel entrepreneurship needs to be encouraged and not belittled.The Delboy model of enterprise is an unfair stereotype. Entrepreneurship is a rewarding though challenging career. The entrepreneurs I know are fixing real world problems, not ‘scamming pensioners and dodging taxes.’ Moreover, entrepreneurship has been shown to be an incredibly powerful way to institute social change and not a ‘blissful western, capitalist belief that good can be achieved by seeking a profit.’ Our two most recent speakers, John Bird and Sir Tom Hunter, show two very different and incredibly successful models of change. John Bird created the revolutionary social enterprise, The Big Issue, which has enabled and supported homeless people in getting themselves out of poverty. Sir Tom Hunter, on the other hand, made his fortune through retail, and plans to invest £1 billion in venture philanthropy. By using the rigorous methods of venture capitalists to ensure progress, Sir Tom hopes to improve education and aid third world development.Entrepreneurs care more about making a difference than making a profit. Yes, money is a huge motivation to work, both in large corporations where shareholders demand returns, and in start-ups where lack of money spells death of the project. But the difference for entrepreneurs is that the project is all important: the entrepreneurs I’ve met are driven by the desire to see their idea or vision actualised, whilst profit is seen more as a way of keeping tally of success.So why do we run Idea Idol? I believe that it is really important that students at Oxford ask themselves, ‘Could I be an entrepreneur?’ Far too many graduates are lured by the money and lifestyle associated with comfortable graduate jobs such as banking and consultancy. The pay is good, but a banker is not going to fix the problems they themselves see as facing society or consumers, whereas entrepreneurs go out and do something about it. Oxford Entrepreneurs (OE) exists to support and encourage emerging entrepreneurs from Oxford. Our successes include five fully-funded start-ups, from Bright Green, who work in ethical recruiting, to Groupspaces, who help clubs and societies manage their members. The steps in setting up an enterprise are relatively straight-forward, but such steps can be incredibly difficult to take. OE tries to make the process a little easier, helping its members build up the momentum they need to run their ventures after graduation, and that was our motivation to run Idea Idol.Yes, there is a male dominance in entrepreneurship and this was reflected in the competition: over 75% of entrants were male. Encouraging women to become entrepreneurs, and the need to level out the numbers, is something of which I am very aware. It is not for want of role models.One need only look to one judge, Reshma Sohni, (Seedcamp) and one of last year’s winner, Jessica Mather-Hillon (Matoke Matoke) for inspiration. We are looking at ways to improve this situation, but are always open to proposals. If you have one yourself, please send it to [email protected] final point. One of the winning ‘idle’ ideas you lambast as ‘milking the NHS for profit’, Altitude Medical, estimate they can save over 2,500 lives a year and tens of millions of pounds of NHS spending. In my opinion that makes them true Idea Idols.Alasdair Bell is the President of Oxford Entrepreneurs.last_img read more

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Press release: New Year, new lick of paint for local charity

first_imgGeneral enquiriesMembers of the public should contact the Highways England customer contact centre on 0300 123 5000.Media enquiriesJournalists should contact the Highways England press office on 0844 693 1448 and use the menu to speak to the most appropriate press officer. Highways England Mental Health First Aiders at OakleafTom Briggs, from Highways England, said: We are thrilled to have the support of Highways England. Bringing our charity and businesses together is a fantastic way of connecting corporate organisations with the local community whilst raising awareness of mental health and reducing the stigma that is connected to this invisible illness. We strive to work with businesses who take a genuine interest in the mental well-being of their staff – Highways England are a fantastic example of a company doing just that, with a wonderful, proactive team of MHFA trained employees based in the Guildford office. Both the staff and clients here at Oakleaf are so grateful to Highways England for all their fundraising efforts so far and for coming down to help redecorate our slightly tired looking room! We look forward to growing this partnership with Highways England as we continue to support some of the most vulnerable adults in our local community live well with a mental illness. We wanted to do something practical and had originally thought about offering to do some gardening – recognising the positive link between physical exercise and well-being. But we found that the art room at Oakleaf was a tad uninspiring and clearly in need of a re-vamp. It has been a real learning curve for those of us with no DIY skills and a great opportunity for us to build links with Oakleaf, a hidden gem whose staff and volunteers do such a fantastic job. We hope to continue to support them. Eli Beckett at Oakleaf Enterprise said: Highways England staff painting the art roomTom said: In the weeks leading up to D-Day (day of decorating) the team met regularly to organise a rota, delegate tasks and buy supplies. They also gained the support of the local B&Q at Ladymeade Retail Centre who kindly donated some paint and brushes. With Christmas around the corner and it being the season of goodwill the group, who between them work in a variety of roles at Highways England in Guildford, wanted to help a local organisation which supports people with mental health issues.The group of volunteers approached Oakleaf Enterprise, which is located nearby to their workplace, with an offer of help. With 1 in 4 people in the UK suffering from a mental illness every single year, Oakleaf’s services have never been more vital.The December timing was perfect as over Christmas one in ten people feel unable to cope, rising to a third of people with a mental health problem. And over a quarter of people feel the pressure to have the ‘perfect Christmas’, increasing to half of those with a mental health problem (48%). Many of the individuals Oakleaf support don’t have loved ones to celebrate with at this time of year and the charity needs donations to give as presents to their clients at their Christmas party. So we also collected donations from our colleagues for Oakleaf to give to their clients at their Christmas party. Our volunteering is mutually beneficial as we are able to raise the profile of volunteer Mental Health First Aiders both within our organisation and the wider community. In the same way first aiders are called to help people with physical injuries we are here to offer initial support and guidance to those going through a difficult time or may be experiencing symptoms of anxiety or depression, especially at times like Christmas when there is social pressure to be seen as having a good time.last_img read more

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Speech: Social media, young people and mental health

first_imgEveryday magic, but it is not automatic. Resilience isn’t a fixed attribute. It’s something we can teach. It’s something that can be learned, it’s something that must be nurtured.It’s an essential life skill that we should equip every child and young person with, so they can meet challenges head-on, face adversity, learn and grow, and improve as a person.I’m delighted we’re working with our colleagues at the Department for Education to equip and empower children, from a young age, with this essential life skill.Teaching resilience, along with self-respect and self-worth, learning about the importance of honesty, courage, kindness, generosity, trustworthiness and justice.Values to live by, and vital to our mental health.We’re also teaching children about the dangers of fake news and why truth matters – whether it’s falsehoods about vaccines or falsehoods about people.As a parent, I want to protect my children from the dangers in this world, but I know I can’t be with them every minute of the day – I don’t think they’d like it very much if I tried.But I hope that what I’ve taught them will help prepare them for the challenges they will face in the future.As parents, as a society, we can’t remove every challenge, but we can teach young people how to overcome them, how to cope with adversity, and how to become more resilient.So it comes down to this:Responsibility: everybody playing their part – social media companies, government, parents and carers.Research: building the evidence base to improve our understanding, and improve the new technology.Resilience: teaching the right way to respond to challenges.That’s how we protect our children. And that’s how we build a safer, healthier world for them to grow up in.And it is an area in which we can succeed – we are leading the world and we must not fail if we’re going to ensure the next generation grows up to live the happy and fulfilling lives that we all want to see. An Irishman, a Barbadian and a Kiwi…Sorry, there’s no punchline – I just wanted to talk about our England cricket team, who I met on the way over here at Downing Street.And our brilliant England captain, star bowler and star batsman, and this entire generation of England cricketers, who come from so many different backgrounds to play for our country.Because these guys – like the England Women’s World Cup team – are role models to so many boys and girls in this country.And it’s a sign of how far we’ve come since Norman Tebbit’s infamous ‘cricket test’ that nobody cares where you come from, only where you want to call home. And I hope that we call it a new cricket test that we are a meritocracy as a country wherever you come from.I thought it was worth starting with the England cricket team, not only to cheer everybody up but also because we have to make sure that we remember what the recent past was like when we decide on the future.Our sporting role models now reflect what our country looks like – and this itself is a huge sign of progress. I think we can take that analysis into the space we’re talking about tonight.Because things weren’t always better for children and teenagers before smartphones and social media. We often discuss the impact of social media and the challenges it brings but as mentioned in the introduction we must also remember the great advances it brings.By most metrics it’s never been better: smoking is down, alcohol misuse is down, drug abuse is down. More young people are staying in school and going to university than ever before.You see the thing is, no matter how much we care about improving our country, we’ve always got to base those improvements on an honest assessment of where we are. An honest assessment means also reflecting that each age brings new challenges and our task is to rise to those new challenges and harness those for the benefit of our society.This afternoon some of the biggest social media companies in the world – Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Google, YouTube, Tumblr and Snapchat – all came together at the Department for Health and Social Care……the Matt Hancock app was also represented.And what we discussed is exactly what we’re talking about tonight – young people, social media and the impact on mental health. And the word that kept coming up in the meeting – and not just from me – was responsibility.It was clear: the penny has now dropped – social media companies get that they have a social responsibility, and that we all have a shared responsibility for the health and wellbeing of our children.This was the third social media summit I’ve called this year, and so far we’ve managed to get the big tech firms – which includes Twitter – to agree to remove suicide and self-harm content, and start addressing the spread of anti-vax misinformation, Instagram have introduced a new anti-bullying tool, and they’ve all repeated to me that they recognise they have a duty of care to their users, particularly children and young people.The next step from the work we’ve been doing is research. Today, we agreed that we must build a scientifically-rigorous evidence base so we can better understand the health impact of social media, and so we can better identify what more we need to do to keep our children safe online.We will use the data that social media companies hold for social good. Because, while we’ve made significant progress in these past few months, there is still much more to do.And ultimately we need to ensure we allow those who express themselves on social media as a cry for help to make that cry while not subjecting others to the damaging impact of viewing material that promotes self-harm or suicide.And I have made it crystal-clear that if they don’t collaborate, we will legislate.So today, we agreed to start a new strategic partnership between the Samaritans and ‘the big 6’: Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Google, YouTube and Twitter.We want the social media companies to contribute at least £1 million to get this partnership off the ground. The government is playing a leading role in bringing this partnership together, and has also contributing funding.Our mission will be to follow the evidence: develop a scientifically based understanding of what the challenge is, and what resources, support and guidelines we need to establish and better protect children and young people online.And the key will be to ensure we have a clinically credible analysis of what should and shouldn’t be online and ensure when social media companies want to take down content that is harmful, or are required to take down content that is harmful, the boundary of what should and shouldn’t be online is defined by clinical standards. There’s a clear need for a partnership here to make sure we get that line right.Ultimately technology isn’t the problem: cars don’t kill people because of a design flaw. People die in car crashes, most of the time, due to human error.The challenge with social media is also a human challenge.I’m well known for caring about driving technological upgrades through the NHS and before that across the economy as culture secretary. The reason I care about technology is because I care about people.Ultimately, harnessing people to harness technology – that is the challenge that we face. The challenge we face online is to ask the question: are humans going to do the right thing?Are social media companies going to play their part by making their services safer?Are governments going to hold these companies to account?And how are we going to support parents and carers to keep their children safe and healthy online?Essentially, how are we all going to live up to our responsibilities?And I believe we will. For 2 reasons.First: history shows us that new technologies sometimes develop faster than our ability to fully understand their impact, but when we do catch up, we act successfully.It took a century of speed limits, vehicle inspections, traffic lights, drink-driving laws, seatbelt legislation, to make driving as safe as it is now. And now, per mile driven, cars have never been safer.And we’re still not done, because driver-less cars will be the next step – proof that progress is driven both by advances in understanding and improvements in the technology itself.And of course that progress, itself, is never complete.I take inspiration from the first modern labour law in this country, introduced by a Conservative: Robert Peel, father to Sir Robert Peel, one of our greatest prime ministers.The 1802 Health and Morals of Apprentices Act recognised that cotton mill owners needed to better protect the children working with this new-fangled machinery.Now, it took a few more decades, and a few more factory acts, before child labour was outlawed altogether, but that first Factory Act, introduced by a Conservative mill owner, started the course of gradual improvements to make the world of work safer for children, women and men.This task of harnessing new technology for the benefit of society does not take one act of parliament – it is a constant effort to make sure our rulebook is up to date, to allow for the great innovations of our age but to also ensure the benefit of that innovation is brought to the whole of society.The history of technology, the history of humanity itself, is one of constant and gradual improvements. Now, gradual does not mean slow – that’s not to say we need to wait decades for change to happen.The pace of technological transformation is faster now than at any point in history so we must pick up the pace of progress to make this technology safer, sooner.Look at it this way: Facebook is 15 years old now, which in tech years is about… 46. They’ve even appointed Nick Clegg – and you don’t get more of a grown-up than Sir Nick.So this technology is maturing, there’s more middle-aged people now using Facebook than teenagers, and through improving our understanding and improving the technology, we can make it safer for everyone. That’s the first reason I have confidence that we will get this right, but it requires constant effort to upgrade the laws by which we live.Second: Mental health, thanks to the actions of this Prime Minister, and her predecessor, is finally being talked about, and taken as seriously as physical health.[Political content withdrawn]We’ve started a fundamental shift in how we think about mental health in this country, and the approach the NHS is taking to preventing, treating and supporting good mental health in the future.This fundamental shift is important but it is by no means complete. We’ve put a record amount of funding into mental health services but there is so much more to do.And I think it’s very important that we talk about the impact of social media, and the wellbeing of young people, in this wider context of good mental health: how do we promote and encourage good mental health?So the third, and final thing, I’d like to touch on tonight is resilience, which is really another way of saying prevention: the guiding principle of the NHS over the next decade.How can we help people, particularly children and young people, to become more resilient in the first place?This isn’t about telling people to toughen up – it’s about teaching people the cognitive and emotional skills they need to deal with adversity.It’s about promoting positive mental health and preventing problems from causing illness.Because life will throw at you challenges, times of stress and adversity – losing a job, divorce, bereavement. It’s how we respond, how resilient we are, that ultimately determines the impact on our mental health.The child development expert, Professor Ann Masten, puts it brilliantly: Resilience does not come from rare and special qualities, but from the everyday magic of ordinary, normative human resources in the minds, brains, and bodies of children.last_img read more

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32nd Annual Tibet House US Benefit Brings Patti Smith, Jason Isbell, Jon Batiste, Angelique Kidjo, & More To Carnegie Hall [Photos]

first_imgThe 32nd annual Tibet House US Benefit Concert was held on February 7th to a sold-out audience.The event, which has been captivating audiences for over three decades, was created to support the Tibet House US. Founded in 1987, the nonprofit institution was created at the request of the Dalai Lama to provide the continued preservation of Tibet’s rich cultural history. Amidst the opulence and cultural heritage of Carnegie Hall, the event played host to a diverse range of celebrated artists. Composer Philip Glass, who once again served as the artistic director for the event, explained to the crowd that “everyone who plays here is a gift.” A gift, indeed, with a stellar lineup that included the Chris Robinson Brotherhood, Debbie Harry, Patti Smith, New Order’s Bernard Sumner, Jon Batiste, and Nathanial Rateliff, to name a few.A group of Tibetan monks opened the show with a traditional chant, and as their six voices became one, a profound resonance was created, one powerful enough to raise the consciousness of the room and set the stage for a night of memorable performances. The first artist to take the stage was avant-pop artist Laurie Anderson, accompanied by celebrated cellist Rubin Kodheli. Anderson dedicated her composition to her teacher, Tibetan Buddhist lama Mingyur Rinpoche, who taught her that “everything is love.” A highlight of her set was her leading the audience in a collective scream, inspired by Yoko Ono‘s social media reaction to Trump’s 2017 election.Tibetan musician Tenzin Choeyal lightened the mood with a melodic and enchanting rendition of his song, “Heartstrings”, backed exquisitely by The Scorchio Quartet (who also joined Debbie Harry, New Order and Jon Batiste later performances). Chris Robinson and Neal Casal of the Chris Robinson Brotherhood added a little swagger to the event with “California Hymn”, invoking the roots-rock majesty of The Band.Jason Isbell followed with a striking departure from his typical repertoire, trading in his typical folksy ballads for an experimental instrumental guitar set. Debbie Harry, sporting a cape that read “Stop Fucking the Planet,” performed a haunting deconstruction of her hit, “Heart of Glass”, with support by Philip Glass on piano. The Patti Smith Band performed The Rolling Stones’ “I’m Free”, featuring teases of Lou Reed’s “Walk on the Wild Side”. Members of New Order, including Bernard Sumner, roused the audience with “Ceremony,” “Love Vigilantes” and a cover of David Bowie’sBe My Wife”.Standouts of the evening included Nathaniel Rateliff and Jon Batiste‘s rollicking cover of Sam & Dave‘s ‘Hold On, I’m Comin’”, Patti Smith’s spoken-word “Prophecy’s Lullaby” into Midnight Oil‘s“Beds Are Burning” (which had the audience dancing in their seats), a stunning two-song piano set by the ever-adroit Jon Batiste, and Stephen Colbert‘s surprisingly sober reading of Allen Ginsberg‘s poem, “Birdbrain”, accompanied by Glass on piano. African artist Angelique Kidjo, dubbed by TIME magazine as “Africa’s premier diva,” ended the night with her stunning vocal range, leading a boisterous group finale of Talking Heads‘ “Once in a Lifetime”.Below, you can view a gallery of photos from the event courtesy of photographer Jeremy Gordon.For more information about Tibet House, head here.32nd Annual Tibet House U.S. Benefit Concert w/ Jason Isbell, Patti Smith, Nathaniel Rateliff, & More | Carnegie Hall | New York, NY | 2/7/18 | Photos: Jeremy Gordon Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Vermont to get $30 million in stimulus funds for economic development

first_imgUS Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt) says Vermont will receive $30 million under an innovative and proven economic development program New Market Tax Credits (NMTC) to spur economic growth and affordable housing in the state.  The funds, included in the recently enacted American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), will be formally announced by Secretary Timothy Geithner at noon today.  The New Market Tax Credit Program, created in 2000, offers incentives to private investors to invest in economic development projects that primarily benefit low-income Americans, by offering them 39 percent of their investments back as a federal tax credit.  As a result, the developer can pay investors below-market interest rates, resulting in the equivalent of a federal grant to help buy down the developer s borrowing costs. Leahy, a senior member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, played a key role in including the program in the stimulus package and had also laid the groundwork for it in letters he sent both to President Obama and Senate leaders last winter while the recovery act was being drafted.The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act included $3 billion to meet the needs of unfunded 2008 NMTC applications and an anticipated high number of 2009 applications.  During the summer of 2008, Vermont Rural Ventures, an organization consisting of Housing Vermont, the Vermont Economic Development Authority, the Vermont Housing Finance Agency and the Vermont Community Loan Fund, submitted an unsuccessful application.  Leahy worked to ensure that the new ARRA funding would allow funding of the Vermont application.Leahy said, These tax credits will leverage private investment dollars that are sorely needed by several Vermont communities.  The program will take root immediately, putting Vermonters to work at construction sites, creating housing for vulnerable Vermonters and laying the groundwork for long-term economic growth. The New Market Tax Credit program will give us tremendous new resources to help communities meet their economic development and related affordable housing needs, said Nancy Owens, President of Housing Vermont.  Private equity raised by the program will help close the affordability gap on critical local projects.”No Vermont entity has successfully competed to administer New Market Tax Credits in the past, though two affordable housing and community development projects have used the investment tool in recent years.  In 2008, Champlain Housing Trust used $2 million in New Market Tax Credits to help build its new headquarters and 20 units of affordable housing on King Street in Burlington.  In 2007, Housing Vermont used New Market Tax Credits to help rehabilitate downtown Richford s Sweat Cummings building which currently provides space for a downtown grocery store, the Richford Community Health Center and housing.  According to Owens, Vermont Rural Ventures, which is controlled by Vermont organizations, will expand access to this proven federal program while minimizing operating costs.  The many advantages of the NMTC program have been difficult to work on a Vermont scale, Owens said.  This announcement means that Vermont finally has a program which fits our needs.Vermont Rural Ventures anticipates funding between six to twelve housing and economic development projects statewide as a result of the new tax credits.  According to the Department of Treasury, projects must be in eligible census tracts which limits projects to severely economically distressed communities in the following counties:  Grand Isle County, Franklin County, Orleans County, Essex County, Caledonia County, Chittenden County, Rutland County, Bennington County and Windham County.U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Congressman Peter Welch (D-Vt.) also supported the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.Source: Senator Leahy (WEDNESDAY, May 27)last_img read more

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Australia’s first dispatchable solar project nears completion

first_imgAustralia’s first dispatchable solar project nears completion FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Design News:Despite its zeal for fossil fuels, Australia has also undertaken some of the world’s largest battery energy storage projects. The installation of a Tesla 129 megawatt (MW) Powerpack battery at the Hornsdale Power Reserve in South Australia has improved power grid reliability and has already saved the grid operator and local power customers a third of its purchase price in its first year in operation. At the same time, the South Australia government is rolling out a “virtual power plant”—a network of up to 50,000 home solar photovoltaic panels and battery systems that will work together to potentially produce 250 MW of electrical power, reducing the necessity to build a new coal-fired power plant.The latest project, located in Queensland and scheduled to begin operation in early 2019, is the Cape York Battery Power Plant. “The Cape York Battery Power Plant will be the first fully integrated, grid-connected large dispatchable solar peaker in Australia if not the world,” said Lyon Group chair David Green in a company news release. Lyon Group is the world’s leading independent developer of integrated utility-scale battery storage and renewable generation projects. It developed and sold Australia’s first grid-connected, large-scale solar PV and battery storage project.“Dispatchable” is a term that refers to generation that can be used on demand, dispatched upon request by power grid operators. Dispatchable power can be turned on or off to meet market needs. A “peaker” is a power plant that usually runs only when there is high or “peak” demand for electricity. Typically, peakers, such as gas turbines for example, can ramp up quickly to provide an extra boost of electric energy when it is needed. Peakers tend to create electricity at a premium price.The Cape York Battery Power Plant is adjacent to the Lakeland Solar and Storage project, which was constructed by Lyon as a 13 MW solar energy production and 1.4 MW battery storage pilot project. This was Australia’s first grid-connected project that combined large scale solar and battery storage.The Cape York Battery Power Plant is a $150 million commitment to new peaking generation and a stronger grid in north Queensland. “The 20 MW/80 MWh Fluence battery-based energy storage system plus 55 MW solar generation will dispatch firm, clean energy through a single connection point, using a single power plant controller,” according to Green. “Only a truly integrated large battery storage and solar plant can deliver dispatchable solar energy, avoiding grid destabilizing voltage and frequency fluctuations, and transitory impacts, by stabilizing the power output. This can only occur when a single power plant controller manages the project and power is dispatched through a single connection point,” he added.Cape York Battery Power Plant will include Australia’s first four-hour duration battery system, making it the country’s first solar peaker. “Solar peakers will quickly take the place of gas peakers because their speed of dispatch, lower and more predictable operating costs and, by extension, lower risk offers unparalleled flexibility,” said Green. “Solar peakers and other four-hour duration battery storage will service a big proportion of Australia’s daily peak demand period.”More: Australia’s first solar peakerlast_img read more

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U.S. DOE report concludes carbon capture at Colstrip coal plant ‘not financially attractive’

first_imgU.S. DOE report concludes carbon capture at Colstrip coal plant ‘not financially attractive’ FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享E&E News:High operating and capital costs could make carbon capture, utilization and storage “not financially attractive” at a large coal plant visited by Energy Secretary Dan Brouillette this month, according to a Department of Energy analysis recently made public.According to the report, which was conducted by DOE and Leonardo Technologies Inc., capturing and compressing 63% of carbon dioxide from each of the Colstrip units to support advanced oil recovery would cost more than $1.3 billion. Annual operating costs at Colstrip could come in at about $108 million, the report said.“The techno-economic assessment of CO2 capture for CO2-[enhanced oil recovery] found that due to significant capital, operating and infrastructure costs, this option may not be financially attractive,” the report said.Completed in May 2018 at the request of Gov. Steve Bullock (D), the analysis assessed strategies for reducing emissions and improving efficiencies at Colstrip, one of the largest and most polluting coal-fired power plants in the West.The Montana Environmental Information Center obtained the report this month through a Freedom of Information Act request, said Anne Hedges, deputy director of MEIC. Its findings were first reported last week by the Billings Gazette.Jointly owned by six utility and energy companies, Colstrip faces an uncertain future as some of its owners intend to exit the power plant and two of its four operating units shut down this year. Washington state and Oregon, which currently accept coal from Colstrip, have also passed laws to phase out coal use this decade.[Miranda Willson]More: DOE: Major CCS project ‘not financially attractive’last_img read more

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Applicants sought for jury instructions panel

first_img Applicants sought for jury instructions panel The Florida Supreme Court’s Committee on Standard Jury Instructions in Civil Cases will have up to eight vacancies at the end of 2005.Any lawyer licensed to practice law in Florida and any member of the Florida judiciary may apply for appointment.An application form can be obtained by e-mailing a request to Gerry Rose, The Florida Bar, at [email protected] If you applied in 2004, your application is still on file and you need not apply again.Applications are to be submitted by June 24. June 15, 2005 Regular News Applicants sought for jury instructions panellast_img read more

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Whale That Washed Up in Hamptons Died of Starvation

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The True’s beaked whale that washed up in Westhampton Beach last week was an emaciated eight-foot-long female calf that died of starvation, according to The Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation.Marine biologists who performed a necropsy Thursday on the emaciated whale that found it had no food in its stomach and had died days before being found Tuesday, a spokeswoman for the group said.“It is believed this whale was still dependent on its mother, and would still have been nursing at this stage,” the group said in a news release, which noted that the whale’s carcass had been scavenged on by animals on the beach.The whale was found the day after a 28-foot-long juvenile humpback whale washed up on Fire Island. The foundation determined that the humpback died of injuries consistent with being struck by a ship.As far as the True’s beaked whale, the foundation noted that little is known about them since they’re rarely observed by humans because they inhabit deep ocean waters far from shore.They can grow up to 17-feet long and weigh 3,000 pounds, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).Their name is derived from Frederick W. True, a curator at the Smithsonian Institution, who described the species in 2002 after one was found stranded on a North Carolina beach, according to the NOAA.Although it’s rare that one of these type of whales washes ashore, an adult 15-foot-long female True’s beaked whale was found on a Long Island beach a day before one of her nearly 9-foot-long calfs also washed ashore last year, the Riverhead foundation said.The lactating mother had ulcers in her stomach, a heavy burden of parasites and was thin, the group said. Although initially stranded alive, she was pushed back into the water by people on the beach before she re-stranded herself and died while the team was in transit.The group wants to remind the public that it is a violation of federal law to interact with federally protected animals like these mammals. Anyone who finds marine wildlife on the beach should call the foundation’s stranding hotline: 631-369-9829.last_img read more

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GOP reaction to Moore accusers is appalling, predictable

first_imgThat would require them to not take his word over the accounts of four women who do not know each other and have no motivation to make any of this up.And that was not the worst of it.Alabama Republicans uttered despicable defenses of Moore:“Take Joseph and Mary. Mary was a teenager and Joseph was an adult carpenter. They became parents of Jesus,” Alabama State Auditor Jim Ziegler told The Washington Examiner.“There’s just nothing immoral or illegal here. Maybe just a little bit unusual.”Actually, the conduct described by the 14-year-old is both illegal and immoral.(It’s not clear whether the other accounts describe a crime or “just” deeply inappropriate and immoral conduct.) “If he does not and somehow manages to win we will not permit him to caucus with Republicans. No party advantage or political boost should be derived from the election of someone credibly reported to behave in this manner.“Had we known about this we would never have countenanced his run.”Instead, a slew of U.S. senators said he should leave if the allegations were “true.”This is a shameful dodge.They need to assess whether to believe Moore, who denies the charges (this from someone twice removed from the bench), or the painful, detailed recollections of his accusers. What’s it going to be, fellas? All they could do was manage to blame Stephen K. Bannon, who backed Moore.But of course, they have all endorsed Moore and now have the power to disown him. The Alabama Republican governor intends to vote for Moore but won’t endorse him.A Toronto Star reporter tweeted, “ ‘It was 40 years ago,’ Alabama Marion County GOP chair David Hall tells me. ‘I really don’t see the relevance of it. He was 32. She was supposedly 14. She’s not saying that anything happened other than they kissed.’” Hall wasn’t done, according to the reporter.“’The story said she said he tried to get her to touch his genitals.’ Hall: ‘Well, she said he may have TRIED to. But we’re talking something that somebody SAID happened, 40 years ago. It wouldn’t affect whether or not I’d vote for him.”The same reporter also recounted another response:“After a long pause, Alabama Bibb County Republican chairman Jerry Pow tells me he’d vote for Roy Moore even if Moore did commit a sex crime against a girl. ‘I would vote for Judge Moore because I wouldn’t want to vote for Doug (Jones, Moore’s Democratic opponent),’ he says. ‘I’m not saying I support what he did.’”The reporter, Daniel Dale, also documented responses from other Alabama Republicans, all vowing to back Moore. If you are sickened by this —  both the cowering from national Republicans and the repulsive defense of Moore coming from local Republicans — you must not be a GOP “tribalist.”That’s the new brand of Republican who will justify any conduct, excuse any behavior, rationalize any rhetoric, adopt any conspiracy theory and deny any evidence to protect the “tribe.”It’s nothing short of moral nihilism, not to mention disqualifying from public service.This has been a long time coming.Republicans put up with Trump calling Mexicans rapists, insulting a POW, making racist accusations against a federal judge, attacking Gold Star parents and boasting on tape about sexual abuse of women.They’ve chosen to ignore accounts from more than a dozen women who allege Trump engaged in sexually inappropriate behavior.Republicans have condoned lying, bullying and willful ignorance by a man some of them don’t trust with the authority to launch nuclear war. So would they let a few allegations of sexual exploitation of children get in the way of a Senate seat?You’ve got their answer.Let’s hope national and local Republicans reconsider their immoral and abhorrent behavior.Let’s pray they do some soul-searching about the purpose of public service and their responsibilities as human beings.If they don’t reverse course, they’ve given voters one more reason to get rid of the whole lot of them in 2018.Jennifer Rubin writes the Right Turn blog for The Washington Post, offering reported opinion from a conservative perspective. Categories: Editorial, OpinionElected Republicans generally reacted in one of two ways to The Washington Post’s deeply sourced report of one women who describes being kissed and fondled by now-GOP Senate nominee Roy Moore when she was 14 years old and reports by three other women who tell about inappropriate advances by Moore when they were teens. Tragically, one of the ways was NOT:“This is an abomination. We believe the accounts of four separate women and corroborating evidence. He must immediately withdraw from the race. More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

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