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Men’s basketball hungry for win heading into matchup with No. 3 Kansas

first_imgSecond phase of Fort Worth Zoo renovation project to open in mid-April ReddIt Linkedin Twitter Katherine Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/katherine-griffith/ Katherine Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/katherine-griffith/ Reservations at TCU Recreation Center in high demand due to pandemic guidelines Katherine Griffith Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award Spring athletes get another year of eligibility TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hello + posts Linkedin Katherine Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/katherine-griffith/ Katherine Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/katherine-griffith/ Twitter Facebook ReddIt Winter storm benefits businesses around TCU Previous articlePop Off Podcast Episode 1: When Harry met MeghanNext articleFilm department kicks off diversity-centered film series Katherine Griffith RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR printTCU is 11-3 when playing at home this season. Photo by Heesoo YangAfter losing four-straight games, TCU basketball returns home looking to get back on track. The schedule doesn’t get any easier for the Frogs, though, as No. 3 Kansas is next up on the schedule.While the Horned Frogs have never defeated a top-three team at home, they are 11-3 when playing in the friendly confines of Schollmaier Arena this season, including an 11-point win against then-No. 18 Texas Tech. Head coach Jamie Dixon hopes an energized home crowd can help TCU get back to the level of play that helped them win their first three conference games.In order to succeed this weekend, Dixon said his team will have to improve offensively from a 72-57 loss on Wednesday at Oklahoma State. “We are on a run here where we have not played well, especially on the road,” Dixon said following the game Wednesday night. “We have some offensive struggles to improve. We try to simulate it in practice, but we haven’t done a good enough job with that.”The Horned Frogs are 2-18 all-time against Kansas and have lost nine of the last 10 matchups.The last time TCU played Kansas at home, the Frogs pushed the Jayhawks into overtime, though they did lose the game 82-77.“You don’t want to give up home games,” senior guard Desmond Bane said after TCU fell to Texas in their last home game.So far this season, the Frogs have been successful from beyond the three-point line. TCU leads the Big 12 in 3-pointers made per game with an average of 8.7.Guard Desmond Bane looks for an opening against Texas. Photo by Heesoo YangBane has been a huge help for TCU from three-point range, as he ranks second in three-point field goal percentage in the Big 12 at 44.2%. TCU’s three-point offense matches up well with Kansas’ three-point defense. The Jayhawks are ranked second in the conference in three-point field goal percentage defense at 29.3%.Bane’s 16.2 points per game are second only to Kansas’ Devon Dotson in the conference with 18 points per game. TCU has also been productive in the paint as center Kevin Samuel has been another primary weapon on offense for the Frogs this season. Samuel is shooting 66.5% from the field, ranking second in the Big 12 and fifth in the NCAA.Samuel will be tested Saturday as he will be matched up with Kansas center Udoka Azubuike, who is on the Wooden Award watch list for national player of the year.Azubuike is nearly averaging a double-double with 12.6 points and 9.5 rebounds per game, all while shooting an NCAA-best 76.3% from the field. “We have to perform at a high level, and I believe we will,” Dixon said.The Horned Frogs are scheduled to tip-off against the Jayhawks at 11 a.m. on Saturday at Schollmaier Arena. Facebooklast_img read more

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Executive lockup raises $30,000 for MD

first_img Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson The Executive Lockup at Bill Jackson Chevrolet in Troy raised a whopping $30,000 on Tuesday for the Muscular Dystrophy Association.Bail was set at $2,400 for each of the 60 “jail birds.” The bail money raised will be used to send 70 kids with muscular dystrophy to summer camp at Camp ASCCA at Jackson’s Gap next June 22-27. Camp ASCCA is a beautiful setting for camp and affords the campers many opportunities to enjoy the outdoors and to participate in activities they don’t often, if ever, get to experience.“Summer camp is a unique and special experience for these kids and the Executive Lockups make it possible,” Jordan said.Funds raised through statewide Executive Lockups also support adults with MD.“The funds assist with clinics, physical therapy and occupational therapy and flu shots for adults with MD,” Jordan said. “MDA also assists with wheelchair repair and leg braces. So the funds raised through Executive Lockups assist children and adults with MD.” Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Book Nook to reopen Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Print Article Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Email the author Skip Sponsored Content Messenger photos/Jaine TreadwellHandcuffs Donna Hicks, Troy University and Terrisha Wilson, MDAcenter_img By The Penny Hoarder Published 1:27 pm Tuesday, June 17, 2014 “Participants in the Executive Lockup are nominated and, until this year, we didn’t have enough nominees to hold a lockup in Troy,” she said. “This was a great lockup and we appreciate all of those involved and all of those who gave so generously so kids with MD can go to summer camp.”The ratio of counselors to campers is one-to-one so there will also be 70 counselors at MDA Summer Camp next week.Each camper has a counselor with them at all times to help with their special needs and to enjoy the camping experience with them, Jordan said.“The campers participate in a variety of activities including horseback riding, tubing, fishing and carnival games,” she said. “But their favorite activity is the zipline. They have a great time just being together at summer camp.” Angie Jordan, MDA executive director, said she was extremely pleased with the response of the Pike County community to the MDA fundraiser.“We had 39 ‘jailbirds’ raising money on site,” she said. “Those who could not be ‘jailed’ were fundraising online. Participation was great and the giving was very generous.”Jordan said MDA had not held a fundraising campaign in Troy since 2008. Latest Stories Executive lockup raises $30,000 for MD Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration You Might Like Food bank serves 300 families By Christina Myles With enough food to feed 300 families, Paul Outreach Services Inc. hosted its quarterly Mobile Pantry on… read more By Jaine Treadwell Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthRemember Them? I’m Sure Their New Net Worth Will Leave You SpeechlessbradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Design students bridge gaps

first_imgOver fall break, 14 design students attempted to bridge the gap between Notre Dame and the South Bend community through a design blitz led by John Bielenberg, founder of the design service program Project M. Bielenberg is a pioneer of the “thinking wrong” approach to design, which involves drawing inspiration for projects in unconventional ways, and Project M implements design projects conceived through this method to address social problems. Senior industrial design major Alisa Rantanen said students followed the thinking wrong approach in conceiving of their projects, starting with brainstorming words. “It started with brainstorming and mind-mapping random words, not even design related,” Rantanen said. “Each group was given a prompt. So my group was given ‘Rick James’ and ‘chalk,’ and all in one day we were told, ‘Go make a project based on that.’” Three different projects emerged from the brainstorming session: chalk talk, PROJECTiiON and IN South Bend. Rantanen said her group worked on chalk talk and painted a chalkboard wall in downtown South Bend so people could share their thoughts with the community. “It’s a way to give them a voice where otherwise many people wouldn’t be heard,” she said. “The next phase is to bring it to Notre Dame.” The prompts on the wall say “I am,” “I think,” “I feel” and “I dream,” Rantanen said. Industrial design graduate student Kevin Melchiorri said PROJECTiiON stands for “Projecting Interactive Images On Neighborhoods.” The project’s goal is to project meaningful images on visible buildings in downtown South Bend at night, he said. “This process creates a beacon that invites, unites and empowers viewers through selected content,” Melchiorri said. PROJECTiiON also works with chalk talk to project images of the chalk wall, Melchiorri said. “We are currently collaborating with chalk talk and have plans to create a series of projects in the future that involve video games, movies, lighting, restaurant and local business promotion and kinetic energy from the audience’s physical participation,” he said. IN South Bend is an initiative to get a trolley to run from Main Circle to downtown South Bend to encourage more students to visit. Junior graphic design major Jeff McLean said the idea for the project was based on the phrase “insane clown posse struggle bus.” “We used this to drive our concepts around creating an atmosphere of fun, new experiences and excitement around student trips downtown,” McLean said. “An important component of doing this effectively was to make going downtown a tangibly branded experience for students.” To promote the project, McLean said his group built a “bus” out of PVC pipe and tied balloons to it. They filmed themselves traveling downtown, leaving a balloon at each place they stopped. The group then posted the video online and asked viewers to sign a petition to make the bus a reality, he said. Senior industrial design major Bobby Reichle, a part of the group that developed IN South Bend, said he hopes the project will draw more students downtown because the area has a lot to offer. “For me, my favorite place in South Bend is the Main Street Coffee House, and no one knows it exists,” Reichle said. “I want people to move beyond the cookie-cutter stores of Eddy Street and actually see the local character of downtown South Bend. There is actually some worthwhile stuff there.” Senior industrial design major Airi Kobayashi said the design blitz forced the students to interact with South Bend in a new way and to talk to community members to learn more about the area. “We realized how much South Bend has more to offer than we thought there was and how much of a disconnect there was from the Notre Dame community to South Bend,” Kobayashi said. The blitz’s format and short time limit also enabled the students to put design skills they learned in the classroom to practical use, Rantanen said. “I knew this was going to be a super-creative, super-intense process, and I wanted to get … the messier side of actually making things real,” she said. Rantanen said seeing her project come alive was one of the best parts of the blitz. “This was a great opportunity to do something and see the direct impact,” she said. “Our chalk wall – less than 24 hours later, people had written all over it, so it was really rewarding to have that immediate impact.” Contact Tori Roeck at [email protected]last_img read more

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Chilean Lieutenant Colonel Joins Military Exercise at Fort Bragg

first_imgSince 2003, the Armed Forces of the two countries have participated in PANAMAX, sponsored by the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). This exercise involves the operational deployment of forces to protect the Panama Canal and the Central American region. Originally proposed by Chile, PANAMAX was launched as the result of coordinated efforts between Chile, Panama, and the United States, and has grown significantly since it began. Chilean Army Lieutenant Colonel Carlos Parra Meier recently took part in the multi-national Combined Joint Operational Access Exercise 15-01 (CJOAX 15-01), a training operation designed to enhance co-operation and inter-operability among its participants. “Chile and the United States are creating a common vision of security issues in the hemisphere, and this exercise is part of that vision,” said Miguel Navarro, a researcher at the National Academy of Political and Strategic Studies (ANEPE) of Chile. “It’s important for Chile to have interoperability with NATO forces in order to have a more active participation in international operations.” A large airborne operation The exercise, held April 10-21, was the largest U.S.-U.K. bilateral airborne training operation at Fort Bragg in the past 20 years; it featured Paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division’s (82 ABN DIV) – 2nd Brigade Combat Team and about 900 Paratroopers from the United Kingdom’s 3rd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment, 16 Air Assault Brigade. “This Chilean participation in a major military exercise on U.S. soil summarizes all the work of collaboration and cooperation among the two nations. Today, more than ever, strengthening ties and gaining experiences are as vital for a country as it is to have well-trained Army officers in multiple disciplines.” By Dialogo July 02, 2015 Excellent work, this should be the army’s function during peacetime. Saving the new generations and making the future more human. Marines from the 2nd Marine Division at nearby Camp Lejeune, meanwhile, participated in the exercise April 12-17. “More than 2,100 American and British paratroopers jumped into Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on April 13 for the start of a massive exercise,” the fort’s press office reported. They leaped from American C-17s and C-130s as well as Royal Air Force aircraft before moving to seize an airfield, evacuating non-combatants, and executing offensive and defensive operations. Exercises promote inter-operability The CJOAX 15-01 began with a warning and strategic deployment from the nearby Pope Field Air Force base in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Participating Troops performed a Forcible Entry Joint Operation that night, followed by seven days of tactical exercises. Lt. Col. Parra joined in the airborne assault on April 13, and thereafter served in the command post of the Task Force on the Future Operations Department, deployed by the 82 ABN DIV – 2nd Brigade Combat Team and Regiment 3, where he worked with British and U.S. officers. In addition to general training, the exercises also promoted inter-operability; they gave participants the opportunity to learn about each others’ equipment, tactics, and standard operating procedures, according to Lt. Col. Mike Shervington, commander of 3 Para, a Global Response Force U.S./ Military unit, the Army Times reported. The Chilean Army reported that it “continues to position itself with an international presence, in order to enhance its combat capability and working staff for the benefit of multinational interoperability.” In 2014, Military personnel and integrated staff members from Brazil, Belize, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and the United States participated in PANAMAX, which also featured cooperation from the United Nations and Conference of Central American Armies. The exercise at Fort Bragg is not the first time Chile and the United States have cooperated on a Military exercise. These exercises were “quite beneficial, in this case not only to Lt. Col. Parra, who won a real international experience in his field,” but also to Chile in general, said David Rozowski, a security analyst and CEO of Citizen Security Foundation in Chile. Also, Cadets from the Chilean Military School participated in the 49th annual Sandhurst Military Skills Competition at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in April. The Chilean team won fifth place overall in the competition. Chile and U.S. also cooperate in PANAMAXlast_img read more

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The number of poor in Florida continues to rise

first_img The number of poor in Florida continues to rise Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Florida’s population is growing, and its number of poor people is also on the rise, which will mean The Florida Bar Foundation will face some unique challenges in the future.“We found out through the Bureau of the Census that the number of poor people in America is increasing,” Foundation President Bill Davis told The Florida Bar Board of Governors in August. “Eleven point five percent of Americans are living in poverty and 15 percent of the children are in poverty.”In his annual report to the Bar board, Davis said the poverty figures mean that from 2003 to 2004, more than one million additional people have slid into poverty, and the trend is even worse in Florida.“Florida has had a decrease in real income and an increase in the poverty rate,” he noted.Davis also reported that “there’s a category called the severely poor, whose income is less than half the poverty threshold. Five percent of Americans are in the severe poverty category, and a disproportionate proportion of those are immigrants and children of immigrants who are exploited on wages.”Recent wage trends have not helped the poor, Davis said. Statistics show that in recent years, income for the top 1 percent economically has increased 184 percent, while for the bottom 20 percent, it has only risen 6 percent. For the very poorest, it has declined, he added.On the positive side, he said the Foundation expects to improve finances in coming years, primarily from its Interest on Trust Accounts program.After several years of falling or stagnate income because of low interest rates and high bank charges, the Foundation is improving in both areas. Davis said the Foundation has negotiated with banks to cut charges and pay interest equal to other types of deposits.Interest rates have also begun to rise.The Foundation weathered the low interest rates of the past decade better than many similar organizations in other states because it set up a reserve fund when interest income was high. Davis said the Foundation had to cut funding by 25 percent to legal aid agencies and other programs, but that was less than other states.He said that clients helped by Foundation-funded agencies were reduced from 130,000 to 90,000, but he hopes that will be reversed soon.Aside from IOTA funding, the Foundation’s campaign to recruit new “fellow” members has been a success. Done in selected counties, the program allows lawyers to become a Foundation fellow for a $1,000 contribution, which can be paid over five years. The receipts go into the Foundation’s endowment fund.In the past two years, the campaign has helped bring in more than 10,000 total donors, compared to 2,500 over the previous six years. The campaign is being to expand to all parts of the state.“When people hear about your Foundation and that they can make a lifetime donation, they sign up,” Davis said.The Foundation has also benefited from the Bar’s Challenge for Children program, which allows lawyers to make a donation to the Foundation on their annual Bar membership fee statement. Proceeds from that effort have helped the Foundation fund $700,000 in special projects for children.IOTA funds, Davis said, go to 35 legal aid agencies, and also help fund summer internships for law students and two-year fellowships for recent law school graduates. The fellowships allow them to attack special, in-depth problems.The Foundation is planning for the expected increase in IOTA funds, which he said will be used both to increase funding for legal aid and also restock the Foundation’s reserve fund for the next, inevitable downturn in interest rates and income.Davis thanked the Bar and the Board of Governors for their continuing support, and the board approved a resolution encouraging all current and future Bar members to become Foundation fellows.Bar President Alan Bookman praised the Foundation for its efforts, and noted the Foundation’s 50th anniversary as well as the 25th anniversary of the IOTA program are coming up. The number of poor in Florida continues to rise October 1, 2005 Senior Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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Hempstead Court Evacuated for Bomb Scare

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York First District Court in Hempstead was evacuated for a bomb scare on Monday (NYS Unified Court System).Judges, lawyers, court officers and defendants were evacuated from Nassau County’s criminal courthouse in Hempstead following a bomb threat on Monday morning, authorities said.Hempstead village police said the threat was reported at First District Court on Main Street shortly after 9 a.m. No explosives were apparently found in the building following a search.“We are working towards minimizing disruption and restoring court services,” Daniel Bagnuola, a court spokesman, said in a statement. “The safety of the public and staff is our top priority.”He said the evacuation was over about an hour later when court staffers and visitors were being allowed back inside.last_img read more

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CU-branded card – Get in my wallet

first_img 24SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Lou Grilli Lou Grilli is a Senior Innovation Strategist. Lou is tasked with building and shaping a superior payment and member experience capability for PSCU and its Owner credit unions. Lou’s … Web: https://www.pscu.com Details An app was just released that allows drivers to pay for tolls from their phone. The app, called FastToll, keeps track of toll plaza locations, and figures out which state to send the payment to. What does this have to do with credit unions? Everything! It’s one more example of payments disappearing. Using an app to pay for parking meters using EasyPark, Parkmobile, or PayByPhone; the recent releases of Walmart Pay and CVS Pay, using Uber or Lyft, and reserving a table and paying for dinner all from within TabbedOut or OpenTable, are all examples of cardholders not pulling out plastic to pay. The one common denominator is that at some point the consumer entered a 16 digit payment card number, with a CVV and an expiration date. The questions is: whose card did they use?There’s been a lot of discussion and hype around the cool new mobile wallets, Apple/Android/Samsung Pay, and the need to be not just top-of-wallet, but now, top-of-phone. But long before Apple Pay was even announced, people were enrolling a credit card into their Sunpass, E-ZPass or Fastrak transponder account. In many cases it’s been years since the credit card was updated. It just gets topped up automatically. These “old school” transponders are making mobile payments. It’s not the same technology as Apple Pay and Walmart Pay, but it still requires a payment card.Mobile payments represent less than 1% of all payment transactions. But that still represents nearly half a billion dollars in payments, according to Javelin Research, and is expected to grow to $8 billion over the next two years. Credit unions are missing a few opportunities to get their CU-branded debit or credit card as the default card in these apps and websites to be on board for this tremendous growth. Every time a member comes in to a branch, the member should be reminded to make the credit union’s card the default card in each app. Reminders and tips should be seen on the credit union’s online banking site, and for those few who still receive statements via postal service, inserts should be included educating members that the best card to use when paying in an app is the credit union’s card.last_img read more

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Local doula discusses pregnancy concerns during COVID-19 pandemic

first_img(WBNG) — Between risking contacting COVID-19 and not having access to the necessary support during delivery, local women are looking at other options for giving birth. Doulas provide support in a variety of ways to mothers throughout every step of their pregnancy, including helping moms decide where they want to give birth. For more information on resources for home births, visit some of the links below: “I think the fear of the hospital, and that being the driving factor is really worrisome. Most outcomes are great, and normal, and that’s wonderful, obviously it’s unpredictable,” said Sivers. The CDC reports about one percent of all births in the United States happen at home. However, one local doula says she’s noticed an increased interest in home births. For some, the stress of being pregnant during a pandemic may pose health issues for mothers in the long-term. Sivers says she’s an advocate for home births, having had one herself. However, she says deciding where to have a baby is not a decision that should be made lightly. “We’re going to see a huge change somehow, hopefully I would love to see it for the better, in maternal mental health, during the pregnancy and postpartum,” said Sivers. “Every once in awhile, I’ll get an email or a call, or something on social media, asking about resources for home birth midwives. Just the amount since this pandemic is probably more than I’ve gotten in the past three years in business,” said Nicole Sivers, owner of Doulas of Broome County. “Some are very pregnant already, so it’s not something they would’ve thought about before everything that’s going on,” said Sivers. Broome County Maternal Child Health & DevelopmentDoulas of Broome CountyMothers & Babieslast_img read more

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Singapore donates medical equipment to Batam in mutual effort to combat COVID-19

Singapore has donated safety equipment and ventilators to Batam hospitals in Riau Islands province to help treat COVID-19 patients.    Singaporean Consul General in Batam Mark Low handed over 50 hazmat suits and two ventilators to Batam Mayor Muhammad Rudi on Friday as the city braces for a surge of infections.While Singapore has established a protocol and heightened border surveillance to prevent the further spread of the disease, Indonesia has only started testing suspected patience and taking measures to minimize close contact between people. “We appreciate the help from the Singapore government. Batam and Singapore have enjoyed a long relationship,” Rudi said at the consulate general office in Batam, which is a mere 70-minute ferry ride from the city-state.Singapore has mandated quick tests for travelers who arrive at the country’s air, land and water ports with symptoms, as reported by The Straits Times. They must undergo the test even if they do not meet the clinical definition of being a suspected case.  The two countries were recently involved in a dispute over Indonesians who tested positive for COVID-19 in Singapore. Jakarta accused its neighbor of withholding information about the patient, while the latter insisted in had passed on all the pertinent details to Indonesia’s Foreign Ministry.Rudi said Singapore was more advanced in its response to the pandemic, while Indonesia had just started plan to construct a hospital exclusively for COVID-19 patients on Galang Island, also located in Riau Islands province.  Low urged the public to remain on alert as the pandemic seemed to be far from over.“Life is normal but [people] should be careful and follow instructions from governments,” he said.Topics : read more

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Hospitals turn to snorkel masks to ease respirator overload

first_imgStop-gap solutionIn the worst-case infections, patients have to be hooked up to respirators in intensive-care units. But respirators are in desperately short supply worldwide because of the sheer number of patients. The snorkeling mask solution could be a stop-gap measure for patients on the brink of intensive-care treatment but for whom no beds nor respirators are available. Hospital masks for the less-intensive BiPAP (bi-level positive airway pressure) machines are also lacking.Bonnier said that from Monday he will testing 50 of the masks on patients. They are the same brand as those used by Italian doctors, donated by the French sportswear retailer Decathlon that has stores worldwide. The masks themselves are made in Italy.He explained they were far more comfortable than the hospital ones that fit over the nose and mouth, biting into the skin. But he cautioned they were not tested to medical standards, meaning they were one-use only, unable to be sterilised between patients. The Italian design for the 3D-printed valve also needed reworking. “It seemed fairly complicated to make, pretty heavy, not very comfortable. So we had the idea to go a little further by thinking on it and developing our own connection part,” he said.The new plastic valve connectors have now been 3D-printed and are ready to be tested.Bonnier added that health workers in COVID-19 wards could also use the masks for protection against the virus. But he fears the public will start panic-buying them, thereby depriving hospitals of a potentially life-saving product. He also said that, even if the tests prove conclusive, there were still questions about how many such masks could be made available by sporting companies, under what conditions. “They are to be used for patients with severe respiratory problems. The aim is to avoid having to intubate the trachea of the patient and put them on a respirator,” said Frederic Bonnier, a respiratory physiotherapist at the hospital who also teaches at the university.He spearheaded the design of a custom-made valve that fits to the top of full-face masks, where the snorkel is meant to go, allowing them to connect to standard BiPAP machines that feed pressurized air into masks. This helps prevent the collapse of alveoli, lung air sacs needed for the intake of oxygen into our bodies and the exhalation of carbon dioxide. Pneumonia brought on by COVID-19 inflames the lung membrane and fills those sacs with liquid. Topics : As hospitals face an overload of COVID-19 patients struggling to breathe, innovative medical staff are turning to snorkeling masks from sports stores to stop their lungs collapsing.The idea started in Italy, the European country worst-hit by the coronavirus pandemic, with hospitals in other nations taking note and adding their own specific medical parts to make it work.One such is the Erasme Hospital on the outskirts of Belgium’s capital Brussels. It is attached to the city’s ULB university — and through it to a private spin-off, Endo Tools Therapeutics, whose knowhow in 3D printing for medical use has proved invaluable. Retailer cautious Learning of the emergency use being made of its snorkeling masks, Decathlon expressed “interest” — but also prudence.”At the moment we don’t have confirmation that these solutions really work,” it said on its Twitter account.”If we see successful try-outs, and these hospitals confirm to us that some tests work, then we’ll keep you informed. But in the meantime, beware of unsourced and unverified information spread on social media in recent days.”last_img read more

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