Month: January 2021

Dean, wife bike from Ariz. to ND for cause

first_imgCollege of Science Dean Gregory Crawford and his wife Renate have encountered 42 flat tires and a few tarantulas while biking 2,200 across the country.The couple is raising money to represent the newly-enhanced relationship between Notre Dame and the Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation, which united to support research dedicated to finding a cure for Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease, according to the Crawfords’ blog documenting their experience.The couple will arrive at Main Circle on Monday between noon and 1:30 p.m.In their blog, the Craw-fords wrote that they are making the 2,200-mile challenge to raise awareness about NPC and the new partnership as well as to raise funds.This partnership will also be a model for future research projects of Notre Dame’s Center for Rare and Neglected Diseases.The Parseghian Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to funding medical research projects to find  treatments and a cure for NPC, a deadly neurodegenerative disease.Since they began their journey on July 24 in Tuscon, Ariz., Crawford said they have biked in six states and have overcome many challenges. On their longest travel day, the couple rode 120 miles through Texas.“By far, [the most rewarding part of the trip] has been meeting the Notre Dame family along the way,” Crawford said.Cindy and Mike Parseghian, both 1977 graduates of Notre Dame, established the foundation in 1994 because of the diagnosis of NPC for three of their four children.“It has been wonderful working with Cindy and Mike Parseghian, Coach Ara and the Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation,” he said. “They turned their hardship into hope for so many others.”The foundation currently funds 25 labs researching NPC, according to Notre Dame’s College of Science website. It has been a sponsor of medical breakthroughs including the identification of the gene responsible for NPC1, and the discovery of cholesterol pathway that occurs in all humans.After already biking over 2,000 miles, the Crawfords have hit the home stretch. Crawford said they have confidence in achieving the 2,200-mile goal.“We will succeed because of our common vision and direction, our unity of purpose, our sense of camaraderie and cooperation and our spirit of commitment to the values and vocation that have always guided the College of Science,” the Crawfords wrote in the blog.last_img read more

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Week calls attention to disorders

first_imgEating disorders, such as bulimia and anorexia, are increasingly common in the United States, but they remain a highly stigmatized topic many feel uncomfortable addressing. National Eating Disorder Awareness Week, which takes place this week, hopes to change this trend. The event attempts to foster recognition of eating disorders not as choices but as serious, life-threatening illnesses, according to a press release on the event’s website. As coordinator of Eating Disorder Services at Notre Dame, staff clinician Valerie Staples said many students struggle with how they eat and how they view their bodies. “Eating concerns and body image concerns are very prevalent on this campus,” she said. “Last year, of students who came here to the counseling center, 9.8 percent reported eating concerns.” Staples said the frequency of disordered eating among Notre Dame students can be attributed to the University’s intensely competitive atmosphere. “We have a culture on our campus of ‘always do better, always improve,’” she said. “This reinforces people thinking about how they look in comparison to somebody else, about how much they eat and exercise in comparison to somebody else.” Staples also said society and media play a role in creating pressures leading to eating disorders. “It’s hard to pick up a magazine or watch any sort of a commercial nowadays that isn’t encouraging us to lose weight or to re-shape our bodies in some way, saying that we’ll be more happy or successful if we do,” she said. “While making physical improvements isn’t a bad thing, at what point do we need to appreciate other qualities in ourselves?” Staples said eating disorders are underreported at Notre Dame not only because many students are afraid or embarrassed to ask for help, but also because many don’t realize they have a problem. “For many individuals, they simply don’t recognize that what they’re doing is destructive and unhealthy,” Staples said. “Weight loss is considered a good thing, and so they think ‘the more the better.’” Recognizing many of the primary misconceptions surrounding eating disorders, Staples said there is harm in labeling eating disorders as a woman’s problem. “Certainly there are a greater percentage of women who are affected by eating disorders, but it would be a very narrow perspective to think about this as only a women’s issue,” she said. “If we look at eating disorders this way, we continue to make it more challenging for men to recognize its impact in their lives and to seek treatment.” Staples said if you know somebody struggling with an eating disorder, the most important step in helping them is simply saying something to them. “It’s very important that you let the person know that you’re concerned,” she said. “It may not necessarily be an easy conversation to have, but until the person recognizes that their problem is affecting other people they may continue to be comfortable with it.” Ultimately, Staples said all members of the Notre Dame community have a responsibility to change the atmosphere on campus by taking the eating struggles of others into consideration in language and actions. “As a community we should be mindful of our language in terms of how much we talk about weight, calories, exercise,” she said. “We all have a responsibility to make changes in our culture in that way.”last_img read more

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Design students bridge gaps

first_imgOver fall break, 14 design students attempted to bridge the gap between Notre Dame and the South Bend community through a design blitz led by John Bielenberg, founder of the design service program Project M. Bielenberg is a pioneer of the “thinking wrong” approach to design, which involves drawing inspiration for projects in unconventional ways, and Project M implements design projects conceived through this method to address social problems. Senior industrial design major Alisa Rantanen said students followed the thinking wrong approach in conceiving of their projects, starting with brainstorming words. “It started with brainstorming and mind-mapping random words, not even design related,” Rantanen said. “Each group was given a prompt. So my group was given ‘Rick James’ and ‘chalk,’ and all in one day we were told, ‘Go make a project based on that.’” Three different projects emerged from the brainstorming session: chalk talk, PROJECTiiON and IN South Bend. Rantanen said her group worked on chalk talk and painted a chalkboard wall in downtown South Bend so people could share their thoughts with the community. “It’s a way to give them a voice where otherwise many people wouldn’t be heard,” she said. “The next phase is to bring it to Notre Dame.” The prompts on the wall say “I am,” “I think,” “I feel” and “I dream,” Rantanen said. Industrial design graduate student Kevin Melchiorri said PROJECTiiON stands for “Projecting Interactive Images On Neighborhoods.” The project’s goal is to project meaningful images on visible buildings in downtown South Bend at night, he said. “This process creates a beacon that invites, unites and empowers viewers through selected content,” Melchiorri said. PROJECTiiON also works with chalk talk to project images of the chalk wall, Melchiorri said. “We are currently collaborating with chalk talk and have plans to create a series of projects in the future that involve video games, movies, lighting, restaurant and local business promotion and kinetic energy from the audience’s physical participation,” he said. IN South Bend is an initiative to get a trolley to run from Main Circle to downtown South Bend to encourage more students to visit. Junior graphic design major Jeff McLean said the idea for the project was based on the phrase “insane clown posse struggle bus.” “We used this to drive our concepts around creating an atmosphere of fun, new experiences and excitement around student trips downtown,” McLean said. “An important component of doing this effectively was to make going downtown a tangibly branded experience for students.” To promote the project, McLean said his group built a “bus” out of PVC pipe and tied balloons to it. They filmed themselves traveling downtown, leaving a balloon at each place they stopped. The group then posted the video online and asked viewers to sign a petition to make the bus a reality, he said. Senior industrial design major Bobby Reichle, a part of the group that developed IN South Bend, said he hopes the project will draw more students downtown because the area has a lot to offer. “For me, my favorite place in South Bend is the Main Street Coffee House, and no one knows it exists,” Reichle said. “I want people to move beyond the cookie-cutter stores of Eddy Street and actually see the local character of downtown South Bend. There is actually some worthwhile stuff there.” Senior industrial design major Airi Kobayashi said the design blitz forced the students to interact with South Bend in a new way and to talk to community members to learn more about the area. “We realized how much South Bend has more to offer than we thought there was and how much of a disconnect there was from the Notre Dame community to South Bend,” Kobayashi said. The blitz’s format and short time limit also enabled the students to put design skills they learned in the classroom to practical use, Rantanen said. “I knew this was going to be a super-creative, super-intense process, and I wanted to get … the messier side of actually making things real,” she said. Rantanen said seeing her project come alive was one of the best parts of the blitz. “This was a great opportunity to do something and see the direct impact,” she said. “Our chalk wall – less than 24 hours later, people had written all over it, so it was really rewarding to have that immediate impact.” Contact Tori Roeck at [email protected]last_img read more

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Faculty studies concussions

first_imgBaraka Bouts and Bengal Bouts may be two of the most anticipated annual athletic events at Notre Dame, but for computer science faculty members Dr. Christian Poellabauer and Dr. Patrick Flynn, the fights offered a chance to put two years’ worth of concussion diagnostics research to the test. “Impacted brain function can cause slurred speech,” Poellabauer said. “Specifically, we isolate vowels in the words spoken by the athlete into a microphone and look at the different frequencies that are presented in [his] speech and see how they deviate from the norm.” The program analyzes a boxer’s voice recording after his or her match and compares it to a baseline vocal sample recorded during a pre-fight physical examination, Poellabauer said. The algorithm then “spits out” a score representing the possibility of a concussion. “If the score is above a certain threshold, then we would refer the athlete to a doctor for examination,” Poellabauer said. For Bengal and Baraka Bouts, boxers could opt into the test, which required them to speak certain words into an iPad microphone, Poellabauer said.  “We looked just a little deeper into the actual composition of the voice to see if there’s any kind of … change in the frequencies or the amplitudes,” she said. “We were focusing on the vowels because they’re the easiest to examine, to find changes. And luckily we were able to find such changes.” Poellabauer and Flynn said these indicators of a potential concussion include distorted vowels, hypernasality and imprecise consonants, but they agreed the biggest challenge for the team is collecting enough data to support effective analysis. “It turns out that a boxing tournament is almost ideal in terms of data collection,” Flynn said. “We don’t want anyone to get concussed, but they’re guaranteed to happen in a large-scale boxing tournament.” The program does not guarantee an accurate final diagnosis of potential concussions, nor is it meant to do so, Flynn said. “The idea is to make this a rapid screening tool that basically anyone can perform, and it’s intended to characterize the risk,” Flynn said. “It’s not diagnosing per se, but it is providing this score that if it has any kind of elevated level, you would probably suggest to a coach that a follow-up medical visit is necessary.” The application has the potential to be applied toward other types of brain damage, including diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, Flynn said. There are also plans to team with the Cleveland Clinic to expand the test’s use to other sports and potentially prepare it for the commercial market. “The goal of the app is to be fairly conservative,” Flynn said. “Any commercial or widely-used version of the app would need to guard against false negatives.” The project began nearly two years ago in the fall of 2011 when Poellabauer and his team, which includes additional faculty and students, contacted University physician James Moriarty about applying their diagnostic test to athletes in danger of concussions. “We actually had some students doing a class project on using tablets for detecting brain injuries,” Poellabauer said. “After that project was over, we had the idea of trying to reach out to Dr. Moriarty … to see if we could use such a test on campus, and he offered for us to test for the boxing competitions.” With the support of Notre Dame and the Cleveland Clinic, Poellabauer and Flynn said they hope the app will be more widely tested. “It’s very preliminary, but there’s definitely interest in our work,” Flynn said.last_img read more

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Greenpeace director speaks on drilling

first_imgOn Sunday, Feb. 22, Saint Mary’s sophomore and student government association (SGA) sustainability chair, Mikhala Kaseweter, held a viewing to watch Greenpeace USA executive director Annie Leonard host a live streaming party. During the live stream, Leonard expanded upon reasons why we must prevent Shell from drilling in the Arctic and how we can stop this from happening.Caitlyn Jordan According to their website, Greenpeace USA is the leading independent campaigning organization that uses peaceful protest and creative communication to expose global environmental problems and to promote solutions that are essential to a green and peaceful future.Leonard kicked off the live stream by describing her experience on her voyage to the Arctic and detailing the unspeakable beauty and complex ecosystem of the vast region.“Just from the natural perspective, it is a gorgeous place,” Leonard said. “It is the air conditioner of the planet. The melting of the ice caps not only threatens habitats and releases the major fossil fuel, methane, into the atmosphere, but it also opens up space for oil companies to drill.”The major oil company, Shell, plans on obtaining permission from the U.S. Department of the Interior and the Obama Administration to begin drilling for oil in the Arctic this summer. However, Leonard explained that the stakes for this are extremely high.“The Arctic is treacherous and dangerous place in general, let alone a difficult place to drill for oil,” she said. “The government has estimated that there will be a 75 percent chance of an oil spill. The effects of the British Petroleum oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico would be minuscule compared to an oil spill in the Arctic.”Leonard also brings to attention that Shell has attempted drilling in the Arctic before, referring to “The New York Times” article published on Dec. 30, “The Wreck of the Kulluk.” According to Leonard, the article emphasizes that The Kulluk, Shell’s previous oil rig, could not handle the arctic conditions and ran aground, putting the entire crew and the surrounding ecosystem in imminent danger.“I always get asked, ‘What can we do to stop the drilling?’ The reality is that science and economics are on our side,” Leonard said. “It is looking like the government is going to give Shell the green light to drill. We must turn the volume up on this issue.”Leonard continued her live stream by noting that drilling in the Arctic is a worldwide issue, sharing that her colleagues in Germany have noticed that every single politician in Germany agrees that climate change is one of the most crucial issues of today’s world. For example, in October of 2014 in Copenhagen, Denmark, the 40th session of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was held, she said. One result of this session was an agreement among nations that the Earth’s climate cannot raise more than 2 degrees Celsius or there will be drastic consequences. According to the IPCC, among the many circumstances that must be abided to achieve this, one is that the Arctic must remain untouched by fossil fuel companies, she said.“People ask me if it’s hard [to be an activist]. I say it would be hard not to — to just sit by and not do anything to save the planet,” Leonard said. “We can never compete with Shell on the money front, but we have more people. Our next move is happening from March 16-20, and we are aiming to get over 10,000 people calling the White House. We want you all to call the White House. We are going to bombard the White House with calls to save the Arctic.”At the end of the viewing, Leonard held a question and answer session.Upon being asked by Kaseweter, who is also a member of Greenpeace USA, whether other organizations have united to help protect the Arctic, Leonard responded that others are indeed working towards this goal.“…however, Greenpeace does have some unique tools that they bring to the table — we actually own ships we bring into the arctic,” she said.Kaseweter said it is important to recognize the issues that the earth faces.“I care about the environment and I believe in civil obedience even in this Democratic government today,” Kaseweter said.Kaseweter said she put this viewing together because it was “Annie Leonard and GreenPeace coming together, my two loves. And I also cannot wait to call the White House.” According to Greenpeace’s website, the very latest news on the subject is that the Obama Administration has proposed ideas to expand the protections of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge; however, the U.S. Department of Interior has also proposed its new drilling plan for 2017-2022, which includes Arctic drilling. Tags: Ann Leonard, Climate change, drilling in the arctic, Greenpeace, Greenpeace USA, Mikhala Kaseweter, news, obama administration, Shell, U.S. department of interiorlast_img read more

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Student government association implements sustainable practices at Saint Mary’s

first_imgWhen Saint Mary’s student body president and vice president Bailey Oppman and Lydia Lorenc took office, they wanted to promote sustainability on campus. To achieve this goal, they named junior Emily Harrast and sophomore Kassidy Jungles as the chairs for sustainability under Student Government Association (SGA).While Oppman and Lorenc stressed sustainability, the majority of initiatives fall under the sustainability chairs, Harrast said in an email.“Kassidy and I worked on our own goals for the year, but when it came to things we did not have experience with, [Oppman and Lorenc] were very helpful,” she said. “They helped us figure out our budget for the year, as well as helping us communicate our goals with [College President Jan Cervelli] and other staff.”The chairs’ main goal for this semester was fundraising, Harrast said.“[We] wanted to raise money to buy hand dryers for the student center bathrooms,” Harrast said. “We spent this past semester designing a good product that we felt everyone would enjoy — but also subtly supports sustainability — and selling it to raise the money we needed to support our efforts. We achieved our goal of selling 100 shirts, and we hope to implement the new hand dryers as soon as possible.”Cervelli has stressed sustainability since her inauguration last school year. Harrast said SGA met with Cervelli to discuss goals and hear any ideas she may have for SGA.“Together, we discussed the sustainable practices already in place, which there are a fair number of, and then talked about our goal of getting hand dryers in the student center,” Harrast said.The College has also had an active composting program during this semester, although Harrast said she cannot take credit for that initiative.“While [the composting program] was included in our goals early on, it was started by [senior] Katie Frego and the composting club,” she said. “We work some with the club, but this program is completely run by the club members.”Harrast said she and Jungles hope to continue promoting knowledge next semester.“Our goals … are to spread more information about sustainable things the average Saint Mary’s student can do,” Harrast said. “We hope to do this not only using posters and social media, but also with some fun event we are planning, specifically Earth Day.”Harrast said she believes it is important not only to strive for a more sustainable life, but also to incorporate that principle into SGA specifically.“Having chairs for sustainability stresses how important this topic really is,” she said. “[It] reminds students that we need to constantly think about whether or not actions are sustainable and what we need to do to make them more sustainable.”Tags: 2017 student government, composting, Student Government Association, Student Government Insider 2017, sustainabilitylast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s course strives to promote dialogue and inclusion

first_imgFor over 10 years, Saint Mary’s has facilitated the Diversity Dialogues program which provides an opportunity for students to engage in respectful conversation across differences and learn through that experience. The program, which is done in collaboration with Ivy Tech, is designed to talk about race and issues related to race in a facilitated context, said the director of the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership, Mana Derakhshani.“The program serves as a way to provide students with an opportunity to practice civil discourse on important issues with individuals from different perspectives,”Derakhshani said. “In particular, it is important to have the students from Ivy Tech or other schools participate as they bring diversity to the group in terms of life experiences as well as other aspects of their identity. It also aims to bring together small numbers of community members from different races [and] ethnicities, to learn about and discuss the issue of race and racism in the U.S. and in their community, with the intention of coming up with action plans that the group could implement and thus improve things in their community.”Senior Elizabeth Innis, who took the course in the spring of 2017, explained that the program invites students to engage with identities and experiences that are essential to the society in which we live today.“I believe there is a need for programs like these in all communities, but for Saint Mary’s specifically there is a history of not being very diverse,” she said. “It is not because we are not inclusive, but because nationwide there is a lack of opportunity for and encouragement of minority populations to go to college and succeed. This program is unique in that it invites students who are outside of the Saint Mary’s community to share their thoughts and experiences of diversity and inclusion.”Innis said the greatest goals of the class include reduction of racism, an increase in inclusivity and a fuller understanding of how racism affects people. The program prompts introspection and engagement through positive action, explained Innis.“This action could be as simple as changing your own thoughts on a subject, or calling a friend out for a racist comment, to starting a group which seeks to teach children about racism and how to change it,” she said. “I could not recommend this course enough to students. The dialogue we had with members of the South Bend community was incalculable. I learned so much about myself and all the people involved, and I believe we are all better off because of it.”Julie Storme, the co-founder of the program and professor of modern languages and intercultural studies, said for her this program is one of the most concrete ways that Saint Mary’s prepares women to make a difference in the world.“Diversity Dialogues is meant to help lay a foundation of understanding among individuals who have different lived-experiences,” Storme said. “Furthermore, it strives to show that this kind of understanding needs to be taken beyond Saint Mary’s as members of our community interact, live and move to other communities or other work-study environments. I hope that it makes Saint Mary’s a more inclusive and welcoming to everyone community. I also hope that the student-participants who take it move out in the world ready to listen to others who are different from them and willing to witness how difference is lived in this country and eager to speak the truth they learn.”Tags: center for women’s intercultural leadership, Diversity Dialogues, inclusionlast_img read more

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‘Our voices needed to be heard today’: Students gather in support of Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation

first_imgMaria Luisa Paul | The Observer Students in support of Justice Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination march toward Library Lawn during their Thursday demonstration.Reminiscent of the contentiousness that surrounded the replacement of former Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the two groups participating in Thursday’s events — one in support of Coney Barrett and the other in opposition — clashed at Library Lawn.The cluster of pro-Coney Barrett students initially lined up behind the platform facing the protesters. They were asked to back off to the other side of the reflective pool by Notre Dame Police Department officials because they lacked permission to gather at that space, Sergeant Derrick Chambliss said.Freshman Aiden Robertson, who participated in the congratulatory gathering, said the encounter between both groups was nevertheless peaceful.“As much as I didn’t really appreciate the fact that we were led away even though we were still on the other side of the metal fence, I think that it’s still really respectable that they have some show of force to make sure that everything stayed safe,” he said.Robertson said he disagreed with the scorn Coney Barrett had received from some members of the Notre Dame community, as her confirmation deserved recognition.“I think people definitely have a very valid reason to not want something like that based on their own political leanings, but to show such disrespect for someone, especially someone that’s really their own,” Robertson said. “We should just respect the fact that even if you don’t like what she stands for, this is a really respectable position that she’s now been promoted to.”Second-year law student Bridget Bush echoed Robertson in stating that Coney Barrett’s confirmation represented an achievement for the university.“It’s a huge honor for the University of Notre Dame, especially the law school, and I’m here to express my support for her and for the conservative values that she represents — the rule of law, originalism textualism and Notre Dame spirit,” Bush said.Even though many have expressed concerns over the new Justice’s conservative values, especially in regards to women’s rights and reproductive health, Bush said there was “no better model of feminism” than Coney Barrett.“She’s a mother of seven. She’s a wife. She was first in her class at the University of Notre Dame law school,” Bush said. “She was in private practice. She’s been an exceptional judge on the federal court. And I don’t know how much more successful but women you can find the Justice Barrett.”Similarly to Bush, freshman Marlot Shorey cited Coney Barrett as a role model for women.“There’s a lot of talk in this day and age that having a baby is something that takes away from what your life can be, which is ridiculous, because as ACB shows, being a mother is one of the most like impressive things you can do, and that’s what we were made for,” Shorey said.Though most of the participants said they were Republican, third year law student, Allie Howell, said she did not consider herself conservative. Rather, her motivation to attend the event was to support her former professor, Howell said.“I had the privilege of having now Justice Barrett in class for half of the semester, and I just had a wonderful time in the class and can’t speak highly enough of her as a professor,” Howell said. “She taught everyone the importance of respectful dialogue in classes, and I learned a lot from just having really good conversations with people that thought about statutory interpretation differently than I did.”Despite holding different views than Barrett, Howell said that the Notre Dame professor would not allow her political beliefs to encumber her practice.“I do not think the judiciary is inherently political,” Howell said. “I think it’s been politicized, but I think Justice Barrett will faithfully apply the law as is the duty of a judge, and she’s not a political appointee.”In the midst of a time marked by political polarization, as shown throughout Thursday’s events, Shorey said both sides of the political spectrum had to learn to both respect and listen to one another.“I think people need to take a step back and think about the perspective that they have, and where they come from, and really think about listening rather than just fighting,” Shorey said. “All we want to do is scream back at each other rather than listening to the other side and thinking about how everyone has different beliefs and values. That’s something that Notre Dame used to stand for, and we’re kind of failing in that front right now.”With differences across the political spectrum becoming more salient, to achieve a democratic future, freshman Taylor Batilo had a plea for the Notre Dame community: “Vote.”“I hope no matter what political ideology that you align yourself with, I hope you go out and vote,” Batilo said. “I hope you support American democracy and American ideals, and I hope we show support for whatever candidate you think is the best for our nation.”Tags: Amy Coney Barrett, Notre Dame Police Department, US Supreme Court Carrying posters emblazoned with phrases like “ND for ACB” and “The Notorious ACB,” and waving the Vatican, Gadsden and American flags, a group of students congregated to celebrate Notre Dame law professor Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation to the Supreme Court on Thursday evening.Sophomore Michael Barrett, secretary of College Republicans, said the gathering was planned by a group of conservative students who promoted the event via Instagram on Wednesday as a means to “show support for a member of our community,” he said.“Justice Barrett was appointed properly through the legislative process,” Barrett said. “She was nominated by the president and appointed by the Senate, and she represents an extensive background on originalist interpretation of the Constitution, which seems to be supported by a large portion of the student body. And we felt that our voices needed to be heard today.”With an event opposing Coney Barrett’s nomination scheduled during the same time at Library Lawn, the College Republicans’ secretary said the congratulatory gathering also served as a way to give a voice to all students, despite of their political beliefs.“While this is not a very vocal portion of campus, since normally [conservative] people are silenced and shunned in social media, we thought if we could come together in presence, we could actually stand and represent our political views,” Barrett said. “We have both sides represented on this campus, not just one side. We’re here to show that there’s balance on this campus. We are here for bipartisanship.”The group of almost 60 people assembled by the Law School’s archway at 5:30 p.m. and then made their way towards Hesburgh Library, chanting “ACB, USA!” as they walked. The event finished at 6:15 p.m. with a prayer at the Grotto.last_img read more

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COVID: Gov. Cuomo To Visit White House Today

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Photo: The White House / Tia DufourWASHINGTON – New York Governor Andrew Cuomo will visit the White House today.President Trump said at Monday’s Coronavirus Task Force Briefing that he will meet with Cuomo in the oval office.The governor’s office confirmed the meeting. According to Trump, the meeting was Cuomo’s idea.New York has been the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak in the United States. The president said of the governor, “believe it or not — we get along.”Trump and Cuomo have had a hot-and-cold dynamic during the COVID-19 outbreak, sometimes trading barbs, while at other times appearing somewhat conciliatory.WNYNewsNow asked Congressman Tom Reed during his teleconference Tuesday morning what he’d like to see as a result of the meeting from his perspective as a New York Representative. Reed says it’ll be important for both officials to put aside their differences during the meeting.“I think both should hear each other out, and one of the things we do in the Problem Solvers Caucus that serves us well is that we dont just talk to each other, we listen to each other,” Reed said. “I hope that this is the sentiment and the culture of the exchange that happens there because New York has a lot to offer the rest of the nation as to the lessons of COVID-19, and by listening to each other, that experience with the problems that we face there could be cut short and prevented in other areas of the nation if it is truly given in a good faith nature to focus on the problems facing people, rather than engaging in partisan politics as the motivating factor for the meeting.”last_img read more

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Tickets Now On Sale for The Curious Incident on Broadway

first_img The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 4, 2016 Along with Sharp, Barford, Carey, Faridany and Graham, the cast will also include Jocelyn Bioh, Mercedes Herrero, Richard Hollis, Ben Horner and David Manis. Taylor Trensch will play Christopher at certain performances. View Comments Tickets are now available for The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, a new play by Simon Stephens. The Broadway production will star Alexander Sharp in his Great White Way debut, alongside Ian Barford, Helen Carey, Francesca Faridany and Enid Graham. The Marianna Elliott-helmed production, which began at London’s National Theatre in 2012 and went on to transfer to the West End and win seven 2013 Olivier Awards, begins performances at Broadway’s Barrymore Theatre on September 10. Opening night is set for October 5. Related Shows Fifteen-year old Christopher has an extraordinary brain; he is exceptionally intelligent but ill-equipped to interpret everyday life. When he falls under suspicion for killing his neighbor’s dog, he sets out to identify the true culprit, which leads to an earth-shattering discovery and a journey that will change his life forever. The play is adapted from the novel by Mark Haddon.last_img read more

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