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El Salvadoran president officially apologizes for 1981 massacre

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Anglican Communion AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls [Ecumenical News International] On the 20th anniversary of the end of the El Salvador civil war, President Mauricio Funes issued an emotional public apology for an infamous 1981 massacre of civilians by army troops.Speaking Jan. 16 in El Mozote, about 200 kilometers (120 miles) from the capital of San Salvador, Funes said, “For this massacre, for the abhorrent violations of human rights and the abuses perpetrated in the name of the Salvadoran state, I ask forgiveness of the families of the victims.”Soldiers from the now-disbanded Atlacatl battalion entered El Mozote 11 December 1981 looking for left-wing rebels and sympathizers. In two days, they slaughtered nearly 1,000 men, women and children. Bodies were tossed inside a church which was set on fire. It was the bloodiest single episode of El Salvador’s 12-year civil war that left some 75,000 dead. Twelve thousand more disappeared during the conflict.“I ask forgiveness of the mothers, fathers, sons, daughters, brothers and sisters of those who still today do not know the whereabouts of their loved ones. I ask forgiveness from the people of El Salvador, who suffered an atrocious and unacceptable violence,” Funes said in a speech in front of thousands of farmers at the massacre site, the Associated Press reported.Under its program Communication for Peace, the Toronto-based World Association for Christian Communication (WACC) has supported several film documentary projects and workshops in El Salvador in the past few years to gain public acceptance of the need to come to terms with the country’s violent past, according to a recent news release.One of the documentaries, “Colima,” focused on a mother whose daughter disappeared during the civil war and on the family’s search for truth. The 2008 film was screened in cinemas throughout El Salvador and at festivals abroad and “facilitated the beginning of a judicial process of exhumation of the victims, their identification and the return of the bodies to their families,” according to the WACC news release.However, Msgr. Gregorio Rosa Chavez, the assistant bishop of San Salvador, observed “there is still a lot to do,” even with the peace accords. “We have a lot of ground to make up in human rights,” Chavez told the AP, “as there is in the economic situation of the poor, the poorest part of the population continues to be the poorest.” Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN By ENI staffPosted Jan 20, 2012 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Music Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC center_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET El Salvadoran president officially apologizes for 1981 massacre Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Michael Potter says: Submit a Job Listing January 20, 2012 at 8:45 pm I speak from my heart as I have been to El Salavdor three (3) times, and plan to go many more times if I can. The people of El Salvador are truly some of the most wonderful and heartfelt people in world and deserve to be treated that way. Michael Potter-Urbanek Comments are closed. Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments (2) June 4, 2013 at 11:25 pm My grandma , raised me and my brother in a Refugee camp in Honduras, after my father, and four of her other sons were killed by the government. Now we live in Canada and my grandma wants to go back to El Salvador and exhume the remains. If anyone has any information on how she can go about this, please email [email protected] Carlos Guevara says: Featured Eventslast_img read more

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Betsy Dyer cracked stained-glass ceiling as 1946 GC deputy

first_img Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By Sarah Bryan MillerPosted Mar 16, 2012 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Job Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Betsy Dyer cracked stained-glass ceiling as 1946 GC deputy St. Louis mother became first woman lay deputy — and last until 1970 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN center_img Women’s Ministry Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Elizabeth Huntington Dyer of St. Louis, known to family and friends as “Betsy,” was persuaded by Bishop William Scarlett of Missouri to stand for election as a deputy to the 1946 General Convention. She was the first woman to be seated as a deputy at a General Convention — and the last until 1970.Editor’s note: This is one of a series of articles ENS is publishing during Women’s History Month.[Episcopal News Service] She was a reluctant revolutionary. Reticent and shy, Elizabeth Huntington Dyer of Saint Peter’s Church in St. Louis, Missouri, had to be persuaded to become the first woman lay deputy to General Convention in 1946.Known as Betsy to her family and friends, Dyer was born in 1906 in Providence, Rhode Island. A cradle Episcopalian whose brother was a priest and whose uncle was a bishop, she had deep New England roots. But in 1927, she married a man with almost equally deep roots in St. Louis: Randolph Harrison Dyer, a descendent of the city’s co-founder, Auguste Chouteau.The Dyers, who lived in the city’s Central West End, were active members of St. Peter’s, and had three children: Elizabeth, Clarissa, and John. He was a businessman; she was a stay-at-home mother.“She and Daddy had always been very, very interested and involved in the Church,” said her daughter, Clarissa D. Gordon. “They always had a lot of clergy friends.”In 1946, some of those clergy friends decided that Betsy Dyer should represent the Diocese of Missouri as a lay deputy at that year’s triennial General Convention in Philadelphia. “It was a well-planned move on the part of many,” wrote the Ven. Charles F. Rehkopf, archdeacon of the Diocese of Missouri, in an 1989 letter.“It was Bishop (William) Scarlett who persuaded Mother to do this,” said Gordon. “She was exceedingly apprehensive. She was reticent and shy, and she thought, ‘I’m not qualified to do that.’ But Bishop Scarlett made push after push after push,” and she finally acquiesced.Betsy Dyer’s ecclesiastical relatives were a part of the clerical calculations. Her uncle was a member of the Anglo-Catholic wing, which as a group was a tad slow to accept the full participation of women in the Church. “Some of us,” wrote Rehkopf, “felt the Anglo-Catholics would block the seating of a woman and that a relative of someone as well known as Father Huntington would be difficult” to turn away.Dyer was nominated by the then-rector of St. Peter’s, the Rev. Dr. Clifford L. Stanley, later a professor of theology at Virginia Theological Seminary. Stanley, recalled Archdeacon Rehkopf, felt that “it was time for women to have a voice in the convention. She was elected on the first ballot.”It was by no means certain that she’d be seated at General Convention, however. “We went with her,” said Gordon, then a high school student. The family spent their summers in a small town called Heath, Massachusetts, escaping the St. Louis heat. That year, they made a detour to Philadelphia.Elizabeth was at college, but the rest of the family watched as “Mrs. Randolph H. Dyer” presented her credentials in Philadelphia. “Daddy, John and I sat in the balcony and looked down on all of it,” said Gordon. “Mother was seated, but they were very clear that this was just for this one time.”The Journal of the House of Deputies reports that – after the House was called to order, a passage of scripture was read, and a prayer said – “The Secretary inquired of the House if there were any objections to the seating of any member whose name was called.” Sure enough, a question was raised about seating “a woman who had been elected as a deputy.”A legal opinion was sought from Judge Augustus N. Hand, a lay deputy of New York. According to the Journal, he “said interpretation of ‘layman,’ ‘person’ and ‘man’ in statutes was all-inclusive.” According to a Reuters News Service story that ran in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, he “told the assembled delegates that it would be ‘preposterous’ to limit the word laymen to the male sex.”Judge Hand moved that Dyer be seated, and, eventually, the motion carried. She was elected to head Missouri’s lay delegation to that Convention.“The next morning,” said Gordon, “Daddy, John and I were sitting at a diner – at the counter, a real treat – having breakfast,” and saw a Philadelphia newspaper with a story on General Convention. The paper had a cartoon William Penn as a mascot “and he was tipping his hat to the first woman delegate. We were very proud of Mother.”Were the other delegates kind to her? Were they, well, gentlemanly? “Very,” reported her daughter. “There were people up on the stage who… did not feel it was right that women be delegates. It was not a personal affront to my mother. She felt very, very comfortable and welcome – but she knew that her being a woman was an issue.”A little less than three years later, the Dyers left St. Louis. One of the Dyers’ “clergy friends” was the prominent Wright City, Missouri-born theologian Reinhold Niebuhr; he recommended Randolph Dyer for the position of business manager at Union Theological Seminary in New York. “Daddy was very happy there,” said Gordon, “and because he was happy, my mother was too.”The Diocese of Missouri elected another woman lay deputy to serve in the General Convention of 1949, as did three other dioceses. Despite Betsy Dyer’s prior service, they were not seated “because the Committees of the House of Deputies were ready with an interpretation of Layman that differed from Judge Hand in 1946,” wrote Archdeacon Rehkopf.As in the case of the suffragist Susan B. Anthony, brought to trial for voting in the presidential election of 1872, an official decision was made that the word “man” referred to both men and women – except when it didn’t.And so matters stood until 1970, when women were finally admitted to the House of Deputies. But in 1966, “Mrs. Randolph H. Dyer of Missouri” and the General Convention of 1946 were invoked in a paper summarizing the possible interpretations of those “generic words… ‘he,’ ‘his’ and ‘him’” when it came to questions of ordination to the diaconate, priesthood, and episcopate. Inclusion eventually carried the day.As for Betsy Dyer — shy, retiring, and, according to her daughter, “a very good mother” — she remained active in the Church. Her participation, however, was in more traditionally feminine channels. Never again did she play a part on the national scene. She died in 1996 in Pennsylvania.— Sarah Bryan Miller is the classical music critic of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and a contributor to various Forward Movement publications, including, most recently, “Walking with God Day by Day.” A version of this story appeared in a parish history of St. Peter’s Church, St. Louis, where Miller is a member. Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA last_img read more

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Michael Barlowe named General Convention executive officer

first_imgMichael Barlowe named General Convention executive officer [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings have named the Rev. Canon Michael Barlowe as Executive Officer of General Convention of the Episcopal Church.Currently Barlowe is the Canon to the Ordinary in the Episcopal Diocese of California, an elected member of Executive Council, and a deputy to General Convention from the Diocese of California.“I am humbled and honored to have been appointed as Executive Officer of the General Convention, and am grateful for the confidence placed in me by the Presiding Bishop and the President of the House of Deputies,” Barlowe stated. “In Indianapolis, I was never prouder than when The Episcopal Church concomitantly affirmed our commitment to external mission and internal reform. In effect, we said that with God’s help, we could fly a plane while building it. I believe we can. I love our church, and am blessed to serve as the Executive Officer of the General Convention during such a pivotal time in our history.”Barlowe will begin his new duties in January 2013.“Michael Barlowe brings abundant gifts to this ministry, and I am very grateful for his willingness to say ‘yes’ to this call,” commented Presiding Bishop Jefferts Schori. “His skill in management of large staffs and budgets, public and pastoral communication, developing technologies, detail as well as big-picture vision will serve this Church well.  He has experience of a broad reach of The Episcopal Church’s work – across the United States, in multicultural contexts, with Anglican Communion partners and in ecumenical contexts, and with all orders of ministry. I believe we can expect creative responses in this time of rapid transition and unanticipated opportunities.”“The Executive Officer of General Convention must be a skilled engineer who can tend the machinery of our polity, a wise listener and facilitator, and, once every three years, the master of the Big Top,” commented President Jennings. “I can’t think of anyone better qualified to fill all of these roles than Michael Barlowe. I am delighted that he has accepted this position and I am eager to begin our work together.”Among the duties of the position are: to serve as Executive Officer for General Convention, and, if elected, as Secretary to Executive Council; to coordinate the work of the Committees, Commissions, Agencies, and Boards (CCABs) that are funded by General Convention; to supervise and manage the General Convention office staff, located at the Church Center in New York City; to participate as a member of the executive oversight group of the churchwide DFMS staff.Meet Michael BarloweBarlowe has served as the Canon to the Ordinary since 2006.  Previously, he was the Congregational Development Officer for the Diocese of California (2002 – 2006).From 1991 – 2001 he was the Dean of the Cathedral Church of St. Paul in Des Moines, IA; rector of Grace Episcopal Church in Plainfield NJ (Diocese of New Jersey) 1986 – 1991; assistant rector of St. Paul’s, Westfield NJ 1983-1986; and assistant treasurer of Chase Manhattan Bank, NYC, NY 1977-1980.Barlowe has served as a deputy at six General Conventions and has participated on many committees, commissions, agencies, and boards.   Among his many Episcopal Church activities, he is a representative on the Brazil Bilateral Commission, past editor of The Ecumenical Bulletin, and past chair of the Standing Commission on National Concerns.   He served on the Provincial Synod in three Episcopal Church provinces, was a tutor at General Theological Seminary, and is a coordinator for the Living Stones Partnership for Baptismal Ministry (California/CDSP).Barlowe was graduated in 1977 from Harvard College in Cambridge MA with a Bachelor of Arts cum laude; in 1983 from General Theological Seminary in New York City with Master of Divinity cum laude; and in 2006 from Church Divinity School of the Pacific in Berkeley, CA with a Doctor of Ministry.Search CommitteeNamed by Presiding Bishop Jefferts Schori and President Jennings, the Search Committee for the Executive Officer was: Stephen F. Hutchinson, Diocese of Utah, chair; Bishop Clifton Daniel, III, Diocese of East Carolina; the Rev. Dr. R. Stan Runnels, Diocese of West Missouri; Deborah J. Stokes, Diocese of  Southern Ohio; and Anne Watkins, Diocese of Connecticut.  All are members of Executive Council.The search committee reviewed the credentials of the 19 applicants for the position.“We give thanks for the willingness of a number of highly skilled and gifted persons to offer themselves for this work,” the Presiding Bishop said. “This Church is abundantly blessed by the interest of so many to serve in this way.” Lucinda Laird says: Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments (4) December 6, 2012 at 12:14 pm Excellent choice! Kudos to the committee. December 6, 2012 at 5:14 pm Congratulations, Michael – way to go! You’re the right person at the right time.Lucinda+ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Rev. Netha N. Brada + says: Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Laureen Moyer says: Comments are closed. People Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 December 9, 2012 at 7:03 pm Michael, what a perfect job for you. You are a person of many talents and good intelect. Blessings on this stage of your journey. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ December 6, 2012 at 5:27 pm I am happy to hear of Michael Barlowe’s new appointment. Unbeknownst to Michael, I have followed his career over the years and actually we have a priest/friend in common. I serve in the Diocese of Iowa which is where I first met Michael. Shortly before he left the Diocese, he and I had conversation about spiritual direction. Alas, he left before we could complete that process. I send greetings to you, Michael, and wish you many blessings!!Netha + Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Carol Ludden says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Posted Dec 6, 2012 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

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Church of England investment arm trebles capital in two decades

first_imgChurch of England investment arm trebles capital in two decades Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Anglican Communion Tags Submit a Press Release Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Anglican Communion News Service] The Church of England’s investment arm, the Church Commissioners, has almost trebled the value of its investment fund over a 20-year period, it announced this week. The value of the Commissioners’ investment fund has grown from £2.4 billion at the start of 1995, to £7.00bn at the end of 2015; producing a return of 8.2 per cent last year.The history of the Church Commissioners dates back, in some ways to before Henry VIII’s split with Rome. Clergy in England were not paid a stipend but were given the living – the right to income earned from the parish estates. This income was taxed by Church authorities with ten per cent being sent to Rome. After the Reformation, this went instead to the Crown.As the Church grew, so did the number of parishes; but many clergy found that their parish wasn’t wealthy enough to give them a living. In response, in 1704, Queen Anne established the snappily titled “Governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of Poor Clergy” with responsibility for ensuring that the taxes received from the wealthier parishes was used to pay a living for clergy in the poorer ones.Rather than directly fund stipends; the money was used to purchase land from which a living could be earned; but some clergy chose to invest the funds with the Governors of the Bounty rather than purchase land; and this is how the investment fund began.Over the years, Queen Anne’s Bounty received additional sources of income – including the “profits” from vacant parishes and from the estates of dignitaries – bishops and deans. The latter was the responsibility of the Ecclesiastical and Church Estates Commissioners for England – a body established to review the revenues of the Church and to manage the structure of dioceses, cathedral posts, and parishes.The two bodies were merged in 1948 to form the Church Commissioners for England – a body established by the UK Parliament. The Church Commissioners remain accountable to Parliament and every six-weeks-or-so, a Commissioner – currently Caroline Spelman – has to answer questions in the House of Commons’ chamber from fellow MPs about the work of the Commission.Their responsibilities have changed over the years; but the Commissioners are still responsible for drawing up and approving schemes for opening and closing churches and changing parish boundaries; and are responsible in law for funding certain church posts – including diocesan bishops’ office and working costs; cathedral clergy; and a significant amount in clergy pensions.Generally, the Commissioners do not spend their capital –capital gains are re-invested, which means that the fund – which is spread amongst a range of investments from stocks and shares to shopping centres and forests – continues to grow.After spending their income on their core responsibilities, they distribute their surplus to fund the mission and ministry of the Church of England in more discretionary ways. For many years they have continued their historic role of supporting the work of the Church in deprived areas through grants to dioceses; based on assessments of poverty and need.But in recent years they have become more strategic and provided funds for church growth initiatives.These include the Growing Younger initiative of the Diocese of Birmingham. The commissioners supplemented the diocese’s own funding of £1.7 million with a £1 million strategic development grant to support engagement with children, young people and families in a bid to welcome 2,000 new regular worshippers to join churches around Birmingham over five years.Part of the initiative saw the launch of St Luke’s, Gas Street – a contemporary city centre church focused on young adults in their 20s and 30s. The church has now grown to 300 members and moved into a converted warehouse in the city centre, aiming to engage with students and young adults and bring ‘light for the city’.Another church growth scheme supported by the Commissioners is the appointment of a pioneer minister for the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford, east London; on a site served by both the Diocese of London and the Diocese of Chelmsford.Home to the 2012 London Olympic Games, residents from the five surrounding London boroughs began moving into what had been the athletes’ village in 2014. The area and local community were unknown to them, resulting in little social cohesion and no obvious sense of community. The Church appointed the Revd Annie McTighe as pioneer minister to the village in the summer of 2014 with the help of a grant from the Commissioner, with the role of helping the development of a community.When she first arrived in June 2014, there were just 1,000 people living on the site. Now there are in excess of 7,000 residents. “It was a very quiet little hamlet and now it is becoming a blustering little community – a town with lots of life, lots of activity, going on here,” she said.“Having the title ‘pioneer’ has freed me up and it has freed the community up. I think if I came here and said I was the vicar it would go into that old forms and stereotypes in people’s minds.” She said that being introduced as a pioneer means that people think of her role as “fresh, different, and unusual” and has helped to open doors.Commenting on last year’s financial results, which were unveiled yesterday, the secretary of the Church Commissioners, Andrew Brown, congratulated the investment team for delivering a return in excess of eight per cent. “Without this leadership and good stewardship it would not be possible to support the Church as we do,” he said. “But we must not forget the generous support from parishes, dioceses and cathedrals which provide around three quarters of the Church’s annual spending on ministry and mission.”Click here for the Church Commissioners’ full annual report for 2015 (pdf). Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By Gavin Drake Posted Jun 17, 2016 Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more

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Delight at de-mining operation at site of Jesus’ baptism

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Middle East Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Tags Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Delight at de-mining operation at site of Jesus’ baptism [Anglican Communion News Service] Anglican Archbishop in Jerusalem Suheil Dawani has spoken of his “delight” at news that a mine clearance charity has secured permission to de-mine the area around the West Bank of the River Jordan on the approach to the traditional site of Jesus’ baptism.The baptism site at Qasr el Yahud, south of Jericho, was closed in 1967 after the Six-Day War. In 2011, the site was partially re-opened with access to the river and baptism site made possible through a small track past a military checkpoint. But the land around the road – and the numerous churches on it – remained fenced off with warnings of mines.Now, the Halo Trust, a British anti-mining charity has secured permission from both the Israeli Government and Palestinian Authority, and the agreement of the denominations which were forced to abandon their churches in the area, to begin mine clearance.“I am delighted to know that mines are being cleared on a Holy Site after so long,” Dawani told ACNS. “The clearance of these sites, and others in the Holy Land, are vital for the wellbeing of the local community.“This site will allow more pilgrims to visit one of the holiest places in the region. The Jordan valley is not only the place where Jesus was baptized, it is a place where he stayed, preached and healed.”Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, described the move as “a symbol of hope to a region that struggles with deeply held divisions. It is a source of much pain that a traditional site of the baptism of Christ is now a site scarred by the debris of war. . .At the heart of the Gospel of Jesus Christ is a message of reconciliation, so it is an inspiration to see Halo’s work helping communities to overcome these divisions. Everybody wants to see this land returned to use by the local churches as a place of peaceful prayer and worship: Halo is reaching across the divide to make this vision a reality.”It is estimated that up to 4,000 mines cover the 136-acre site; and there are reports that booby-traps have been placed at the seven churches in the area. The work by the Halo Trust will cost an estimated $4 million and take two years to complete. It will allow Coptic, Ethiopian, Greek, Romanian, Syrian and Russian Orthodox Churches and one Roman Catholic Church to be “restored to their proper purpose and enjoyed by thousands of pilgrims and visitors,” the Halo Trust said. A plot of land belonging to the Armenian Orthodox Church will also be de-mined.“At a time when many religious sites are being destroyed in the Middle East, the clearance of these churches by the Halo Trust offers a powerful symbol of hope,” Mar Severios Malke Mourad, Archbishop of the Syrian Orthodox church in Jerusalem, said. “The Syrian Orthodox church supports Halo’s de-miners in their task, which will enable us to conduct mass and prayer in safety.”The former Custos of the Holy Land, Father Pierbattista Pizzaballa, said: “The Franciscan church has long tradition of worship at Qaser al-Yahud, particularly at Epiphany. Whilst we continue to do so today, our access has been limited due to the deadly legacy of landmines.“We look forward to the day when, thanks to Halo, we will be able to celebrate the sacrament of Christ’s baptism in safety.”The area is considered by tradition to be the site where John the Baptist baptized Jesus in the River Jordan. It is also traditionally considered to be the place where the biblical Israelites crossed the Jordan River and where Elijah ascended to heaven.Following the closure of the site after the Six-Day War, an alternative baptism site for pilgrims who wanted to be baptised or renew their baptism vows in the River Jordan was created at Yardenit, near the Sea of Galilee.Since 2002 it was also possible for pilgrims to be baptized in the River Jordan from the Jordanian side of the river at Al-Maghtas, Bethany beyond the Jordan. In 2008, Jordan’s King Abdullah II donated land atAl-Maghtas to the Diocese of Jerusalem for the construction of an Anglican Church. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Anglican Communion, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York By Gavin DrakePosted Jun 29, 2016 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more

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As violence surrounds, Chicago school’s partnership with suburban church offers…

first_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Gun Violence Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Comments (4) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI April 8, 2017 at 8:21 pm The future is going to be “tent-making clergy”: bi-vocational clergy raised from local contexts and trained (reasonably, in a mercifully short concentrated study course) in order to minister in a specific situation in which he/she plans to live. This future has already arrived as a matter of necessity, but this model of ministry isn’t being done widely, nor effectively. We’re late to the light while we talk about the high number of churches of all demographics who can no longer afford to support the model of a “professional clergyperson” with pay, housing, reimbursements, and benefits. Many ministry situations invite the Church to call people to be raised up within that time and place — for that need. We had better get out of the “professional clergy model” and get more nimble — and quickly, or else the Pentecostals, Baptists, Brethren, Mennonites, and others will step in where we have failed to imagine and emerge. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Tod Roulette says: Bishops United Against Gun Violence, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Community Christian Alternative Academy in Chicago’s North Lawndale neighborhood specializes in helping dropouts earn their high school diplomas. It’s exterior is covered in colorful murals like this one, overlooking a parking lot. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Chicago, Illinois] At Community Christian Alternative Academy, in one of Chicago’s most violent neighborhoods, the dead are still remembered a generation later in bold, black paint.Snake. Pookie. Johnny Rae. Malek. There are others – their names and the years when they died are affixed to two-dimensional tombstones under the letters “RIP” in the outdoor mural that towers over the school’s entrance on South Pulaski Road in North Lawndale on the city’s west side. Because the artwork hasn’t been updated since its creation, these deaths run from 1989 through 1994.A mural from the late 1980s and early 1990s that overlooks CCA Academy’s entrance remembers students and relatives of students killed by drugs and gunfire a generation ago. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“It was a way that the students were expressing their grief,” school founder Myra Sampson said in an interview with Episcopal News Service. “Some of those ‘resting in peace’ were students, and some were family members of students, but it was a way for remembering people they had lost.”The mural is a product of a former era whose violence is not easily forgotten. The murder rates in the early ’90s often are cited as a bleak reference point when tallying Chicago’s recent surge in gun violence and homicides. Last year, 34 people were killed just in North Lawndale, according to Chicago Tribune reporting, and Chicago’s citywide toll rose to 786 in 2016, the most of any city in America. The deadly trend has continued in 2017. The year’s homicide total had hit 155 as of April 7, according to records kept by DNA Info.Chicago, though not alone in facing such grim statistics, is the setting for a conference hosted by a group of Episcopal bishops who see behind the violence an “unholy trinity” of guns, poverty and racism. Bishops United Against Gun Violence’s conference will be held at the Lutheran School of Theology from April 20 to 22 in Hyde Park.The conference aims to illuminate the problems at the intersection of guns, poverty and racism but also bring a Christian message of hope and reconciliation, the bishops say.“Chicago has been the focus of much of the country’s attention on issues of urban gun violence, so it’s my hope that this conference makes a contribution to the creation of effective responses to this epidemic,” Diocese of Chicago Bishop Jeffrey Lee said in an email message. “One of the vows a bishop makes at his or her ordination is ‘to defend those who have no helper,’ in the name of Jesus Christ. I can think of few issues more compelling than this one to make good on that vow.”More than a statistic, shooting deaths deeply affect communities like North Lawndale. Sampson said eight of the city’s homicide victims during the 2015-16 school year were current or past CCA Academy students. She couldn’t recall a year when the school was hit so hard. So far in 2017, nine of the city’s homicides have been in North Lawndale, according to DNA Info.“Our students see so much death and a lot of time don’t have anyone to help them process that,” Sampson said.The nondenominational charter school, which specializes in helping dropouts earn their high school diplomas, has had a partner in St. Mary’s Episcopal Church since the school opened in 1978. A former rector was friends with Sampson, and early on, the congregation in suburban Park Ridge helped the school fill out paperwork, gave $1,000 to create the school’s reading lab and secured the down payment for its current building through a $30,000 United Thank Offering grant from the Episcopal Church.More recently, the church formed a group of a dozen tutors who take turns traveling to the school once a week and providing students one-on-one help with their homework. Such individual attention, Sampson said, may prove critical in helping these 200 or so students, ages 16 to 21, grow into adults who can beat the cycle of violence in their neighborhood.The gravity of the challenge is written on the wall: The victims memorialized in the school’s mural – the youngest, 15, the oldest, 21 – were the same age as students who now pass by on their way inside each day.This closeup of the mural memorializing victims of violence shows the years of their deaths date from 1989 to 1994. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceTutoring program part of suburban church’s longtime outreachPark Ridge is in many ways worlds apart from North Lawndale. Residents in this northwest suburb live in modest, well-kept houses with yard signs supporting candidates for alderman, school board and parks board. During the week, they typically commute to work at office jobs in Chicago or run their own businesses in Park Ridge, said the Rev. Patrick Skutch, St. Mary’s rector of two years.St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Park Ridge, Illinois, is seen in March. The church has a longtime partnership with CCA Academy about a half hour away in Chicago. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceHis congregation is diverse in age, Skutch said, but mostly white. It also is active in the community, for example, organizing a monthly Second Sunday Sack Lunches drive to pack meals for the hungry.“People here really have a passion for serving others,” Skutch said.The tutoring program was started by church member Dava Kondiles, a recently retired music teacher.“The first year it was kind of an experiment. We weren’t even sure what we were going to do,” Kondiles said.Now in its third year, the program has become a valued part of the CCA Academy routine. Every Tuesday, five of the tutors from St. Mary’s, most of them women, spend four hours at CCA Academy, tutoring one group of students in the morning and a second group in the afternoon.Sampson, who serves as the school’s chief education officer, said the emphasis typically is on seniors who need the extra push to graduate, and students appreciate the tutors’ help.“A lot of our students are academically behind, and so sometimes the only way you can grasp a concept and move forward is if someone has some time to spend with you so that you can learn that concept,” she said.Kondiles, a 64-year-old Skokie resident, said the tutors may get just as much out of the sessions, witnessing the students grow in their education. The tutors see themselves as delivering tools that will help these students rise out of poverty.“I call it the education brigade,” Kondiles said. “That’s the great leveler.”Shootings hit close to home for CCA Academy studentsIn even the best traffic conditions, it takes about a half hour to drive from St. Mary’s in Park Ridge down I-294 and the Eisenhower Expressway to CCA Academy. The streets of North Lawndale pass in front of apartment buildings, auto body shops, liquor stores and retail centers, where the bright lights of stores contrast with the side streets’ duplexes, some of them displaying boarded-up windows.By most indicators, North Lawndale is a neighborhood besieged by violence and poverty. A Chicago Tribune report in March that focused on the neighborhood’s plight put the indicators in perspective: Last year, out of 77 Chicago neighborhoods, North Lawndale had the fifth-most violent crimes, fifth-most homicides and second-most shootings, at 282.The neighborhood once was home to the Sears, Roebuck & Co. headquarters, as well as Zenith, Sunbeam and Western Electric. Then in the 1950s, “white flight” was coupled with a surge in black residents, and riots in 1968 over the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. were followed by years of decline and industries closing, according to the Steans Family Foundation. Now, 21 percent of North Lawndale’s working-age population is unemployed, 43 percent of households live in poverty and nearly 28 percent of residents do not have a high school diploma, the Tribune reported.A placard inviting prospective students to “Enroll Now” is positioned outside CCA Academy in March. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceCCA Academy has been a fixture of the neighborhood for all the school’s 39 years. It serves as something of a sanctuary, in a building reclaimed from the neighborhood’s industrial past. The school fills more than 18,000 square feet of a former bottle cap factory, a building that today would be unrecognizable as a school if it weren’t wrapped in telltale murals and signs, including a moveable placard encouraging potential students to “Enroll Now.”The school grounds have been free of violence, Sampson said, but death surrounds. She estimates three or four of her students each month grapple with the sudden death of a relative or friend, typically a casualty of gunfire. And those who escape danger still may be traumatized by the violence they witness on the streets.Students don’t readily share such experiences with their tutors from St. Mary’s, and the lesson-minded tutors don’t want to pry. Their presence in these students’ lives often speaks for itself, as in the aftermath of the killing last year of a CCA Academy student by Chicago police, a high-profile incident that shone a dim spotlight on North Lawndale.The student, 16-year-old Pierre Loury, reportedly was fleeing police at a traffic stop when he was shot by an officer on April 11, 2016, a Monday. Police said Loury had threatened the officer with a gun. The killing sparked criticisms of the force and demonstrations by Loury’s family members and their supporters.The tutors from St. Mary’s learned of the tension in North Lawndale from a school administrator in a phone call Monday night. Should the tutors still come Tuesday? Yes, certainly, was the response. The school wanted to keep a sense of normalcy, Kondiles said.When they arrived Tuesday morning, “the atmosphere was pretty electric,” said Paula Risk, 69, a retired nurse and fellow tutor. Some students were working through their feelings by making posters in memory of their slain fellow student, who was to be remembered at a vigil that night.The drive back to Park Ridge on a day like that can feel like going through decompression, Risk said, but they also see hope to balance the tragedy. The tutors are committed to these students.“We’re called as Christians to help other people, so you help how you can,” Kondiles said.Volunteer tutors Dava Kondiles, left, and Paula Risk discuss their work with CCA Academy students in March at a coffee shop near St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Park Ridge, Illinois. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“People want something different, want something better”The problem of gun violence is bigger than one school or one church, even one city. Chicago has unfortunate company in places like St. Louis, which some have called the country’s real murder capital because it has the highest per capita homicide rate. And a Wall Street Journal analysis in February identified Chicago, Baltimore, Milwaukee and Memphis as the four large American cities that have seen homicide totals approach or break records set in the 1990s.Poverty, racism and violence are “an insidious trinity of evil forces,” Diocese of Maryland Bishop Eugene Taylor Sutton said. Taylor is one of the conveners of the upcoming Bishops United conference and coined the phrase “unholy trinity.”“We see it playing out here in Baltimore almost daily,” Sutton told ENS. “By far, most of the victims of violence are poor and people of color. Also, most of the perpetrators of gun violence are poor and persons of color.”Chicago has the additional burden of becoming a presidential punching bag. After lamenting generally about crime and poverty as “this American carnage” in his inaugural address, President Donald Trump days later singled out Chicago’s violence for scrutiny, warning he would “send in the Feds” if the city doesn’t solve the problem itself.Skutch, the rector at St. Mary’s, thinks Trump’s reaction belies the complexity of the issue. “A lot of our cities in America struggle with the same reality,” he said. “It’s one thing to stand outside it and criticize it. It’s another thing to be in it.”And while gun violence doesn’t plague Park Ridge residents, “our neighbors’ children deal with that on a daily basis,” Skutch said, so his congregation is reaching out any way it can.Outside support is welcomed in North Lawndale, where children often don’t have the same extended family and institutional support that past generations may have relied on, Sampson said. With help from St. Mary’s, students at CCA Academy typically graduate at a rate of 90 percent or higher.Sampson sees more in that achievement that a piece of paper to hang on the wall.“We have young people in Chicago who are 20 and 21 who have not had a job,” she said. “When adults integrate as contributing members of society … we consider that a success.”North Lawndale is a tough neighborhood, but she also sees hope and perseverance.“It is a neighborhood with a lot of poverty. It’s a neighborhood with more than its share of crime,” Sampson said. “But in many ways the good, positive thing is that it’s a neighborhood where people want something different, want something better. They have accepted us and appreciate when someone inputs into the community and into the lives of the students.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Press Release Service Robbie Dorsey says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN April 7, 2017 at 7:47 pm How can this church truly minister into the next 20-30 years effectively when the clergy does not look like the burgeoning U.S. population? And T.E.C. does not put its money where its supposed conscious and mission is—helping the voiceless and powerless? The power structure and seminary as well as clergy it’s overwhelmingly white with no plans to change. It makes everything we do suspect. We certainly are not planting churches in these areas or recruiting black, Latino Asian priests to the seminary in any meaningful way. Let alone Native American clergy. It makes me sad and increasingly angry. It’s white parishes rushing in to put band-aids on problems that institutional power inequity roots and one has only to look at the inaction of T.E.C. to show we have done little to improve it in our own church. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Advocacy Peace & Justice, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET April 7, 2017 at 4:14 pm Guns, poverty, racism? That tired and false leftist narrative must be rejected. It is time to confront directly those who create and disseminate the harmful social and cultural world view that devalue life and the opportunities presented to all who wish to participate in the progress of this free and prosperous nation. The first step is for the local, state and federal authorities to aggressively enforce the law and eliminate the power of the controlling criminal element in Chicago and other large cities. Featured Jobs & Calls As violence surrounds, Chicago school’s partnership with suburban church offers students help, hope Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments are closed. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By David PaulsenPosted Apr 7, 2017 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Doug Desper says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags PJ Cabbiness says: Rector Shreveport, LA April 8, 2017 at 11:07 am True that. Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

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Churches mobilized as Sri Lanka floods death toll passes 200

first_imgChurches mobilized as Sri Lanka floods death toll passes 200 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel [Anglican Communion News Service] Clergy in Sri Lanka have been urged to prepare their churches and church halls to provide refuge for people displaced by serious flooding in the country’s Southern and Sabaragamuwa regions. On May 31, Sri Lanka’s Disaster Management Center said that 202 people had died as a result of the devastating floods and landslides caused by severe rains that have hit the country since May 26, when Cyclone Mora hit the island.Full article. Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted May 31, 2017 Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Anglican Communion, Rector Collierville, TN Asia Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more

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Clergy pray for peace amid violent unrest in Belfast, Northern…

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Advocacy Peace & Justice, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Posted Apr 14, 2021 Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN [Church of Ireland] Clergy in the Shankill area of Belfast took to the streets on April 8 to pray for peace in the midst of scenes of rioting. The following day, a prayer vigil was attended by representatives of different denominations, among them the bishops of Connor and Down and Dromore and Roman Catholic Bishop Noel Treanor.The prayer vigil, held at Forth Spring Community Centre on Springfield Road, was organized by the Rev. Tracey McRoberts, rector of St. Matthew’s Parish, where much of the violence had been focused, and the Rev. Martin Magill, parish priest at St. John’s, Falls Road, at the suggestion of their bishops.Read the entire article here. Clergy pray for peace amid violent unrest in Belfast, Northern Ireland Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Servicelast_img read more

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City Council completes budget workshops

first_img August 24, 2016 at 2:40 pm LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your name here Consensus vote of 5-0 to increase millage rate 0.5The Apopka City Council concluded its series of workshops yesterday by keeping the 0.5 millage increase that was proposed in an earlier workshop.The Council cancelled the scheduled budget workshop for today. The proposed $102,264,752 budget for fiscal year 2017 moves to the public hearings stage next month.The Council voted 5-0 and gave consensus to raise the property tax rate by a half-mill, which would equal $50 in additional annual taxes for every $100,000 in taxable property value. It was the first of three votes needed to set the rate.“I think it’s a modest increase that sets Apopka up for future success,” said Mayor Joe Kilsheimer. “That’s my goal – to set Apopka up for success. I want to make Apopka the best metropolitan community in Central Florida.”“I’m pleased we are putting reserves back,” said Commissioner Doug Bankson. “Putting back reserves was my sticking point. Had we not done that, I would not have been for it.”Commissioner Kyle Becker summarized the workshops as a process, and looked forward to future discussions on the budget.“As we went through the budget process and workshops over the last month, it became apparent we would not be positioned to address short term infrastructure, facility and fleet needs; as well as address resource deficiencies to ensure quality service and safety to our residents. In lieu of pulling more dollars from reserves, it was a unanimous decision to increase the rate by half a millage point. Apopka will still benefit from a millage rate lower than most in our area, but be better positioned for future budget needs. I also look forward to having conversations about new or revised impact fees to mitigate the burden on current residents for growth needs brought on by new development.” Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom If I had of put on my black dress, and got ready, and drove to the budget workshop scheduled for today, I would have been mad since you all, the city council, cancelled. However, I have learned how undependable your scheduled meeting plans are, so I was not taken aback. I will voice my concerns about the property tax millage rate increase at the Sept. 7th, 2016 council meeting ( that is, if you all don’t change the meeting date or time again) ! Mama Mia UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 center_img Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. TAGSApopka City CouncilBudget WorkshopsMayor Joe Kilsheimer Previous articleStanding Desks reduce childhood obesityNext articleTropical System targets Florida Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 1 COMMENT Please enter your comment! Reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 last_img read more

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Updating Breaking News: Single car accident kills driver in Apopka

first_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate TAGSFlorida Highway Patrol Previous articleApopka pastor preaches heresy from the pulpitNext articleSolar Bears looking forward to homestand Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your name here You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 1 COMMENT LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply The Anatomy of Fear center_img So very sorry this accident took this man’s life. There are getting to be so many accidents every single day. I can hear sirens all during the day and into the early morning pre-dawn hours just lying in my bed. It is getting so dangerous with all the increasing traffic, and it doesn’t matter which direction you are traveling, it is dangerous to be out and about on the roads. Updating Breaking News:From the Florida Highway PatrolA driver in Apopka was killed around midnight this morning when he was pinned between a guardrail and his car after being partially ejected from his vehicle after a collision according to reports from the FHP.Anthony Hanks, 44 of Orlando, was traveling southbound on Lakeville Road, under the overpass to State Road 414. His 2005 Chevy Tahoe left the southbound lane and crossed over the northbound lane. Hanks’ left front collided with the guardrail, partially ejecting him from the vehicle. Hanks then re-entered the southbound lane and the Tahoe’s right side collided with a guardrail. Hanks then left the southbound lane again, crossed over the northbound lane again, and the Tahoe’s left side and Hanks’ upper portion collided with the guardrail. Hanks was pinned between the car and the guardrail. He was not wearing a seat belt.The crash remains under investigation. Reply February 13, 2017 at 10:22 pm Mama Mia Please enter your comment! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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