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HSE encourages staff to blow the whistle

first_imgStaff are being encouraged by the Government to blow the whistle onemployers they suspect are breaching health and safety law. The HSE’s Workers Web Page, thought to be the first government Internet siteaimed specifically at workers, informs people of their rights and encouragesthem to make formal complaints and report anything they think poses a risk tohealth. “We are laying a foundation of knowledge that will help to make ourworkplaces safer places to be,” said Health and Safety Commission chairBill Callaghan. The number of people killed at work rose by more than a third last year to295. Comments are closed. HSE encourages staff to blow the whistleOn 1 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Website of the week: www.webofculture

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. In this climate of mass globalisation, pressure is on HR to make sure theircompanies and workforces appear in as good a global light as possible. Thissite was originally set up as a Web-based cross-cultural business resource butnow predominantly aims to help US companies globalise their presence on theInternet. It is an incredibly useful site if you need to get information on aparticular country or culture at short notice. Whether you need to know voltagerequirement in Aruba, Croatia’s currency, what language is spoken in Guadeloupeor gestures you should avoid in the Middle East, this site has the answer. Ithas no fussy graphics, and takes you straight to the information. Althoughregistration is required (this takes a few minutes), most of the information onthe site is free. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Website of the week: www.webofcultureOn 2 Oct 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Employers back day of learning

first_imgEmployers back day of learningOn 1 Apr 2002 in Personnel Today Employer participation in Learning at Work Day is close becoming the norm,according to the organiser Campaign for Learning. An estimated 2,500 employers and 500,000 employees took part in last year’sLearning at Work Day and there are hopes that participation will double,following the trend of the past two years. “We’re keen for businesses of all sizes to participate. We think we’reone year away from it being pretty odd for an organisation not to beinvolved,” said Campaign For Learning chief executive Bill Lucas. This year’s Learning at Work Day is on 16 May. Co-ordinated by the Campaignfor Learning as part of Adult Learners Week, the aim of the day is to makelearning a part of everyday life and highlight the benefits of providinglearning opportunities to all staff. Sponsors of the event are DfES, DTI, theGet On Campaign, Unison, learndirect, MaST and The Mind Gym. Lucas said: “Learning at Work Day is an excellent way of raising theprofile of learning of all kinds in the organisation. There are two keystrands. One is the learning of the individual, which can be personal at oneend and job-related at the other. The second strand is improving the performanceof the organisation. It’s not just about the obvious business benefits thatlearning can deliver, it’s also about the kind of place it is to work.”With the recruitment and retention of good people a number one issue for manybusinesses at present, the learning environment can have a huge impact – eitherpositive or negative – on existing and potential employees, Lucas suggests. One of the themes of this year’s day is the importance of coaching skills.Managers can visit www.campaign-for-learning now to take an on-line coachingquiz to help them identify their coaching style. A coaching surgery with KaizenTraining is also on offer. Organisers want coaching to become as normal andwidespread in the workplace as it is in sport. “The campaign’s position is that everyone needs a ‘learningfriend’,” said Lucas. “The learning reps. initiative which the tradesunion movement has been leading on is a good example. If we could have aculture of genuine giving and receiving of continuous feedback, we think itcould increase the happiness of people at work and improve performance.” Another theme is basic skills. Recent focus groups have revealed thatemployers are in denial that their employees lack basic skills. “Manyemployers maintain they don’t have a problem so there’s a real push in gettingpeople to be honest about the skills levels of their workforce,” saidLucas. Free advice on spotting basic skill needs will be available from the GetOn Campaign. The Campaign for Learning is also hoping to encourage more informal learningin the workplace. Last year, construction services company, Carrillion, set upa ‘learning pledge line’, staffed by senior managers which employees rang toshare their learning experiences. Learning adviser, Naomi Clift, told Training Magazine: “Calls rangedfrom people saying ‘when we did X, Y and Z on a project it worked really well’to something very simple like ‘if you press shift-2 on your keyboard it doessuch and such, which saves you X amount of time’. We recorded everything andput it on the intranet for everybody to share.” Carrillion organisedactivities at corporate level as well as in its five business groups. Inaddition to finding out how the organisation could learn from the individual,it used the day to focus on how individuals could learn about the company.Employees were encouraged to visit the company’s intranet to find outinformation and answer questions. Completed entries were put into a draw for aprize. “We’re a fairly new company and one of our main aims is to move towardsbeing a learning organisation,” said Clift. “Learning at Work Day wasa great way to get across the idea that learning is a normal, everydayactivity. One of the lessons we learned was that we want to have more people onour sites involved in activities so we’re planning ways in which we can do thatthis year.” Halfords invited its head office staff to share in a range of activities.”The way we positioned it to people was that they could do anything theywanted to,” said Development Consultant, Sean Miller. “One of thevalues of our organisation is about sharing a passion, so it fitted for peopleto come to work and share something they were really interested in and helpothers engage with it.” Employees put on activities ranging from Tai Chi to sessions in signlanguage. People could learn to manoeuvre an articulated vehicle, find out moreabout the company’s products and the MD held open sessions to share hislearning experiences. “We even had ‘learning loos’ filled with trivialfacts,” said Miller. “As well as being great fun, it delivered organisational benefits ingetting people mixing and building cross-boundary relationships. We’lldefinitely participate again.” Learning at Work Day was also a goodopportunity to experiment with experiential learning which Halfords is keen on.”It was received so well it inspired us to do something similar inengaging people with our strategy,” said Miller. Employers can request free planning and publicity materials to help themrun and promote their own Learning at Work Day events by calling 0117 966 7755.www.campaign-for-learning.org.ukBy Elaine Essery Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Head to head

first_imgThis week Tony Molloy, HR controller of Stanley Leisure betting division,and Lynne Bulmer, group personnel manager at Racecourse Holdings Trust, comparenotes on their careers1 What are your main responsibilities? TM I am responsible for the complete HR, including policies andprocedures, administration, employee relations and training and managementdevelopment in the betting division of Stanley Leisure. LB I have a very generalist personnel responsibility for 13racecourses around England. The amount of involvement I have at each racecoursevaries on everyday issues such as recruitment, training and welfare, but I amusually very involved when there are disciplinary or employment lawimplications. 2 What’s the pay like? TM While the theorists will tell you ‘it is not a motivator’, morewould be nice! But I don’t complain. LB It is OK. But I have job satisfaction, which is far moreimportant. 3 How flexible are the hours? TM As flexible as I need them to be. I have prescribed hours, but ourbusiness operates over seven days, 9am until 10pm, with evening racing in thesummer. LB Not very flexible at all. Working in the leisure industry meansstaff often have to work unsocial hours, evenings and weekends. I suppose I doa 50-hour week if I am in my own office. 4 What do you like most about the job? TM I love the job in most areas. I like to talk about the businessoutside as friends are fascinated by the betting industry and think I can givethem the occasional good tip, even though I can’t. LB The variety is the best thing of all. All the racecourses haveother events going on outside of racing so there is masses of variety inrecruitment. 5 What are the challenges? TM The same for most businesses this year – recruitment andretention. It is very difficult to compete in the high street for good qualitystaff. We have established a partnership with an agency provider, which isproving to be beneficial in some difficult areas of the UK. LB The personnel department is relatively new to a large part of the companyand the main challenge has been to convince the rest of the organisation thatwe can make a real contribution. But I think most of the racecourses nowappreciate our support. 6 What is your biggest headache? TM It has to be the lack of an HR/payroll management system. I can’tget data easily, which makes decision-making much slower than I would like itto be. But we are about to establish a working party to look at system optionsso hopefully this won’t be the case for too long. LB Keeping up-to-date with the ever-changing legislation can bedifficult. Our terms and conditions statements are starting to read like Warand Peace because we have to fit so many clauses into them. Personally, I thinkit’s all gone too far with some of the tribunal rulings. 7 What size is your team? TM My team of nine includes a management development manager who has fourregional trainers, an administration manager who has two administrators and agap year student from Leeds University. LB There are three of us, which can sometimes be quite a challengegiven the distance our employees are spread around the country. We are based atEpsom but we have employees in Aintree, Cheltenham, Haydock Park, Huntingdon,Wincanton, Kempton and Sandown Park. 8 Who do you report to? TM The managing director of the betting division, John Whittaker,whose understanding of the business and political agendas is extraordinary. LB The managing director Richard Johnston. 9 What qualifications do you have? TM General management with the Chartered Institute of IndustrialManagement, a Diploma in Management Studies and a Diploma in Safety Manage-mentwith the British Safety Council. LB I am a member of the CIPD, which I achieved in my late forties asa bit of a late developer. Apart from that only O Levels. 10 What are your career aspirations? TM I don’t think I’m overly ambitious, I’m generally happy doing whatI’m doing at the time. My ambition is centred on doing the best I can for myteam and company. LB I really am sufficiently challenged in my current role. As long asI remain interested in what I do, I’m happy to keep doing it. 11 What training and development opportunities are there? TM The training and development opportunities are excellent. Thisbusiness has grown managers from within and there is a strong training team inplace, which operates at shop level to develop managers through the assistantand trainee management programmes. LB Virtually any that you want to take. As long as it adds value tothe individual and the business, people are free to choose. 12 What is your holiday entitlement? TM 25 days. LB 22 days rising to 26, same as the rest of the employees. 13 What’s your work environment like? TM Excellent. Stanley Leisure, Liverpool, occupies an office suitewhich looks over the entrance to the Mersey Tunnel, the Liverpool Town Hall,Lime Street Station, Museum and the Walker Art Gallery, which is exhibitingPaul McCartney’s paintings just now. LB Being based at a racecourse means it is very picturesque. Ratherthan staring at roofs, I now get to stretch my legs in acres and acres ofcountryside. 14 What other benefits do you get? TM Bonus, health care and company car (but I have opted for the cashalternative). LB A cash alternative for a company car, so I have that, privatemedical care and pension – and tickets for horseracing of course! We are atrust so have no shareholders. 15 What’s the best part? TM I’m at the centre of the decision-making process. I can contributeto moving the business forward, while helping managers and employees fulfiltheir potential. There’s a whole mix of things involved, from actioningredundancies to design, through to recruitment and development. LB The best thing for me is the feeling that we can make a differenceto the way the people are managed, and therefore make a contribution to thebusiness itself. Getting feedback from managers and staff when they appreciateour support is a nice extra. 16 How does your firm treat work-life balance? TM Work-life balance is of major concern to us. We are open forbusiness when most people are off work (evenings, weekends, bank holidays andso on). We have been described as a ‘community bookmaker’ and our staff lovethe shop atmosphere – we get great commitment from them. LB Not terribly well at the moment. Historically people have worked inthe horseracing industry because they love racing, but because the business hashad to become more competitive, we have diversified and people now work innon-racing roles such as the conference and exhibition side. Long hours is anarea we need to monitor carefully as people won’t stay if they think they arebeing taken advantage of. 17 What’s your dream job? TM My dream job will change as my influences change. In business, givenanother opportunity I think my dream job would be as a barrister. I think it’sa power thing! LB I don’t know really. I get job satisfaction most of the time soI’m very happy with the one I’ve got! Tony MolloyHR controller, Stanley LeisureJob at a glanceSize of team 9Qualifications CIIM qualified, diploma in management studiesLeave 25 daysBest part Being at the centre of the decision-making processCurriculum Vitae 2002 HR controller, Stanley Leisure, Betting division1992 HR manager, Supply Chain, United Biscuits1989 Employee relations manager, BRS1983 Regional personnel manager, Littlewoods Mail OrderLynne BulmerGroup personnel manager, Racecourse Holdings Trust, owned by the Jockey ClubJob at a glanceSize of team 3Qualifications MCIPD, O LevelsLeave 30 daysBest part Making a difference to the way people are managedCurriculum Vitae 1997 Group personnel manager, Earls Court Olympia1988 personnel manager, European Air Catering Services1972 Bringing up a family Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Head to headOn 9 Jul 2002 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Skills shortages as CRB crisis deepens

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Skills shortages as CRB crisis deepensOn 3 Sep 2002 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Employers in the health and charity sectors are losing out on new staffafter having to wait for up to six months to receive clearance for recruitsfrom the crisis-hit Criminal Records Bureau (CRB). Tracy Myhill, president of the Association of Healthcare Human Resource Management,said some members were reporting delays of between 12 weeks and six months forthe bureau to complete checks on new staff who will be working with children. “This has led to delays in appointments at a time when we cannot affordthem,” she said. Myhill is concerned the situation could get worse after the Governmentordered the CRB to ensure all school staff are cleared to work with children intime for the start of the autumn term following the Soham tragedy. The Home Office has redeployed 100 extra staff to cope with demand, but theCRB is struggling to cope with a backlog of 195,000 applications. Clare Smith, HR director of charity Leonard Cheshire, which employs 7,500people and provides care staff for the disabled, said her organisation iscurrently losing around 25 per cent of its new recruits who are findingalternative jobs because of the processing delays. The crisis is set to deepen over the coming months because the new NationalCare Standards mean existing staff will also have to be checked by April 2003. “Checks on existing staff will lead to a million new applications fromthe care sector alone,” said Smith. A spokesperson for the Home Office said the CRB had implemented a recoveryplan and was improving response times, although no date had been set forreaching the original target response rate of completing checks in three weeks.Plans to offer all employers basic checks on staff have been postponedindefinitely because of the huge backlog of applications. By Ross Wigham The CRB’s roleThe Criminal Records Bureau opened inApril 2002 to check the criminal records of staff working with children orvulnerable adults.It took over responsibility for the service from the police.It offers three types of disclosure:Standard: For staff working with children or vulnerableadults. This gives details of all convictions, including those that are spentas well as cautions and reprimandsEnhanced: Similar to standard but includes policeintelligence and information on suspected or alleged criminal activityBasic: All staff can be asked by employers to obtain acertificate of basic disclosure which will show all unspent convictions(postponed indefinitely)last_img read more

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KPMG defends e-mail redundancy decision

first_imgKPMG has hit back at criticism that it acted callously by using e-mail toinform staff they had been made redundant. Press reports last week slammed the professional services firm for informingalmost 700 staff via e-mail that they were earmarked for redundancy as a resultof the downturn in the accounting and auditing market. But Susan Newton, head of HR for tax at KPMG, told Personnel Today that thecompany’s redundancy policy was good practice and suggested by staff. Newton said the organisation met with staff representatives beforeannouncing the job losses and discussed a number of issues including how toinform staff. The company had a number of options, including writing to staff homeaddresses, calling staff at work, mass meetings, individual meetings ande-mail. The representatives told the company that staff wanted the news via e-mailat 8am on the next Monday morning. They explained that this was the popular choice because most staff hadlaptops and would be able to find out at home or in the office if their job wasunder threat. “We did what our staff wanted,” said Newton. “They did notwant a letter to their home and did not want meetings or a phone call as in anopen plan office it would be obvious to colleagues what was happening.” “I was horrified [about telling staff via e-mail] as I knew it wouldmake us look callous,” she added. The HR team followed the e-mail announcement with phone calls, at least twoface-to-face meetings and confirmation letters for affected staff. “The process was clear, transparent, understood and agreed by staff.People have got hold of wrong end of the stick,” said Newton. By Paul Nelson KPMG defends e-mail redundancy decisionOn 12 Nov 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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The Greatest Briton winner

first_img Previous Article Next Article The Greatest Briton winnerOn 11 Mar 2003 in Personnel Today Virgin king gets your vote Richard Branson is the Greatest Briton in Management and Leadership,according to the readers of Personnel Today. An overwhelming majority of HR professionals voted for the charismatic headof Virgin Group. Mike Broad, assistant editor of Personnel Today, argued thatthe balloon-flying business maverick deserved the title for inspiring andentertaining staff and the public for more than 30 years – and readers agreed. Branson has risen from running a struggling student magazine in a basementflat to heading up a global brand that turns over £3.5bn. His companies – whichemploy 35,000 people – are all imbued with his values of opportunism and fun,and Virgin Group has become the pre-eminent employer of choice (to re-read thearticle go to www.personneltoday.com/goto/17534). Anita Roddick’s commitment to an ethical agenda at the Body Shop alsoappealed to voters. She has blazed a trail for women moving into seniormanagement, and was the clear runner-up. We offered one lucky reader a palm top computer for taking the trouble tovote – the competition winner is Suzanne Fretwell, HR officer at Elliott Group.Personnel Today would like to thank the 10 leading figures in the field whocontributed excellent articles on their nominated Britons, and to the hundredsof readers who voted. The Greatest Britons in Management and Leadership by number of votes  1.         RichardBranson nominated by Mike Broad, assistant editor of Personnel Today 2.         Anita Roddicknominated by Max Mckeown, leading management author 3.         Adrian Cadburynominated by Geoff Armstrong, director general of the CIPD4.         ErnestShackleton nominated by Ruth Spellman, chief executive of Investors in People5.         Ernest Bevinnominated by Brendan Barber, general secretary elect of the TUC6.         AlexanderGraham Bell nominated by Paul Pagliari, HR director of Scottish Water7.         Geoffrey deHavilland nominated by Linda Holbeche, director of research at Roffey Park8.         Mike Brearleynominated by Tim Yeo, shadow secretary of state for trade and industry 9.         Jack Jonesnominated by Stephen Bubb, chief executive of ACEVO10.       John Reithnominated by Will Hutton, chief executive of The Work Foundation Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Guru

first_imgGuruOn 25 Mar 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article This week’s guruActing up in storeGuru was interested to learn thatSandwell Council is spending £300,000 on using actors to train staff to dealmore effectively with the public.Guru suspects it is not the first time an employer has adoptedsuch an approach to improving customer service – workers at his localsupermarket appear to have already mastered method acting.The delicatessen boy has obviously been coached by De Niro.”Are you talking to me, ARE YOU TALKING TO ME?” (aggressively, afterbeing asked for quarter of a pound of duck’s liver pate), while the storemanager has drawn on Paul Newman’s performance in Cool Hand Luke, with hiscatchphrase: “What we have here is a failure to communicate when facedwith complaints.”Guru is particularly impressed by the performance of one of theshelf stackers, who can generally be found mumbling incoherently to himself inthe corner “the horror, the horror…”, in a perfect echo of MarlonBrando’s mad colonel in Apocalypse Now.Bogus job advert attracts wrong kind of responseWith the escalation of the ‘global war on terrorism’, Guru has beenstruggling to see the funny side in a lot of things recently. He is not alone – Jobcentre bosses have also lost their sense of humour. Oneof its staff posted a spoof vacancy on the Jobcentre Plus website asking for anassassin. It read: “Looking for someone trained in using an AKW50 sniperrifle. Ideally, you will have done two to four assassinations. However, willingto train someone cold-blooded in nature”. The ad also said the successful candidate would get a top-of-the-rangecompany car and a licence to kill. But after a rapid investigation by Jobcentre management, it looks like theonly licence being handed out will be a P45. Cutting edge of the jobs marketAnd speaking of improbable jobs, aposition for a knife-thrower’s assistant has been advertised at job centres inWirral and Liverpool.Despite its obvious dangers, two people turned up for aninterview – which involved standing on a narrow wooden board while 10, 12-inchknives were thrown at them at speeds of up to 70mph.Apparently the current assistant, Russian-born Jana Rodionove,22, wants to be replaced so she can concentrate on her hula-hoop routine. Hmm. Sothe move has nothing to do with the knives being thrown at you Jana?Guru should apply – Mrs Guru has been throwing knives, plates,cups, kettles and pretty much every other kitchen implement at him for years,and regularly tells him he should be in the circus.Berlusconi bugs ugly mugs with jibeItalian Prime Minister SilvioBerlusconi has angered unions  after hepraised bosses at a cancer research centre south of Rome for employingbeautiful women.He said: “I want to pass my compliments to the directorsfor having such beautiful staff. When you were all hired, beauty as well asintelligence was obviously taken into account. Beauty helps you work better,especially if the person sitting at your elbow is attractive.”Guru hears what Silvio is saying, he certainly works best whenthere are mirrors around. Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Professional dilemmas

first_imgProfessional dilemmasOn 1 Oct 2003 in Personnel Today I’ma training manager and have been asked to write some e-learning material forsome in-house product training. Are there any guidelines you can give me?Designingand writing e-learning content is much more complex than producing classroommaterial. You need to understand how to organise course material so it islogically ordered and includes plenty of meaningful interaction. You must beable to write precise behavioural objectives and have a clear understanding oflearning theory – especially related to learning online. Theability to design questions and analyse responses are both essential skills.You will also need a good writing style and the ability to adapt to meet theneeds of different learners. You must also be able to set upstatistically-based validation tests that demonstrate where courses needstrengthening or adapting.Youcan write acceptable basic e-learning courses using only HTML code. However,access to well-designed authorware will be helpful. Look at a number ofdemonstrations before you commit yourself. You need to consider whether youwill be adding more e-learning courses and, if so, whether the authorware willenable you to manage them. For this, you would be better off with a learningcontent management system (LCMS) than simple authorware.E-learnersneed a lot more support. You could provide e-tutors and ensure the organisationprovides face-to-face support. These should be subject experts who providefeedback to learners’ exercises. Face-to-face support can come from an in-house‘mentor’, whose role is to allocate time and resources and provideencouragement.Iwould recommend you take some training on an accredited course. There includethe Institute of IT Training, the CIPD, Sheffield Hallam University (MSc),Sheffield College and Sherpa Integrated Learning.Makesure you take a course that deals with learning design, not just thetechnology, –  with an appropriate levelof accreditation.BrianHolley is MD of Sherpa Integrated Learning. He has written Designing andWriting E-learning Content and Effective Online Tutoring www.sherpa.org.uk Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Looking forward to a diverse future

first_img Previous Article Next Article Looking forward to a diverse futureOn 21 Oct 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Bill Morris – former general secretary of the Transport and General WorkersUnion, who retired last week – speaks exclusively to Personnel Today about thechanges the UK workforce has undergone during his time as head of the T&G,and outlines why he believes trade unions are failing to embrace the workforce,and what the future holds for UK employeesQ After 12 years as general secretary of the T&G, how has the lot ofthe UK worker changed? A It has changed quite significantly. Now there is a lot moretolerance, acceptance and maturity in the whole employment debate. Looking back, a lot of people on the left categorise the Thatcher years aswasted years; I think they were learning years, because they sent us back intothe workplace to reconnect with our members. They also forced trade unions tolook internally and improve democracy, governance and communication. The Labour Government has come in and made more of a difference. It was boldin combating youth unemployment, signing up to the social charter andestablishing the minimum wage. As trade unions, we have extended the boundaries of bargaining. It is nolonger just about pay and conditions; we bargain about training, theenvironment, job security and a diversified workforce. With work-life balance, time is the new money. Q Is the emergence of the ‘awkward squad’ a progression or a regressionin industrial relations? A I don’t indulge in labels. The so-called ‘awkward squad’ arereflecting the frustration of their members on a whole raft of issues. People are still not getting due respect in the workplace – for example,thousands of people have been dismissed by text message. If I was dismissedunder those circumstances, I would be angry and I would be awkward, and I wouldexpect my representatives to be very angry and awkward. Q Do the unions really still represent the workplace? The number of unionmembers has almost halved in the time you have been general secretary – from 13million to 7 million. Isn’t it true that, these days, employees are in facthappier, and no longer feel the need to be affiliated with a union? A We have a problem – it is an expanding labour market and we shouldhave more members rather than less. Trade unionism has to re-orientate itself and start speaking for workers inall sectors, including the ‘sunrise sectors’ of leisure and IT. Trade unionism has to reclaim the workplace as a legitimate and authenticvoice of all workers, irrespective of whether they are members and whether theyare paying a contribution. Trade unionism is supposed to be about caring, sharing and supporting. If weadopt that model, it will be a return to the 1889 model. That was why tradeunions were started up in the first place. So, rather than people being happier, the new work landscape hasdisenfranchised people from the unions. Q The Department of Trade and Industry has pledged to push on with theInformation and Consultation Directive (ICD). Will it strengthen the unionsthrough increased consultation, or will it serve to weaken them by bypassingunions? A The ICD has been categorised as something for the trade unions.There is no such thing as ‘something for the unions’. They are rights forworkers, and they are mechanisms for the involvement and security of theemployees – the trade unions just happen to be the messengers. It is so important that we embrace information and consultation on the basisof what is decent, what is right and what is good for the enterprise and thepeople who work in it. It is the inalienable right for workers to be consulted and properlyinformed. On that basis, I think you could begin to create a new culture ofparticipation and involvement in the workplace. Q What would you like to see happening and developing in UK organisationsin the future? A The diversity agenda will impact significantly on the workplace asdifferent work groups get more confident about how they contributeeconomically, politically and socially. There is a tremendous under-use of human capital and a tremendous businesscase in recruitment and skills on the basis of new markets you can develop. We must recognise that we are all contributors, however menial it may be.What is just and equitable should be the hallmark of every single workplace inthe UK. If we could establish that, we could add another 20 per cent to ourproductivity capacity; we could enhance our skills base to world-classstandards, and then be in a position to deliver what we all want. I sound like an old man reminiscing for a world that never was and neverwill be, but I just wish that Labour and capital could come closer and identifynot what they disagree about, but what they can agree about, then do it and doit well. www.tgwu.org.ukBy Michael Millar Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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