Category: hqzxturt

Modern Familys Nolan Gould Wants To Keep The Beach Safe For Birds

first_imgModern Family’s Nolan Gould for The National Audubon Society and Toyota, showing how you can keep the beach safe for birds and other wildlife.Video: Help Wildlife by Sharing the Beach — Helpful Tips from Toyota TogetherGreenThis video is the second in a series of comedic videos sharing bird-friendly, and conservation tips that Audubon and Toyota will roll out over the next year. The first video in the series features Kate Flannery of NBC’s The Office in a hilarious video, purporting to be the first ever PSA written, directed and edited by birds.The videos are presented by Toyota TogetherGreen, a partnership between Toyota and The National Audubon Society that supports and fosters diverse, community-driven conservation projects that result in sustainable and innovative solutions. The program, now in its seventh year, has invested $25.4 million in community-based conservation, engaging more than 435,000 people in 295 cities and all 50 states. For more details about Audubon and Toyota TogetherGreen, please visit: www.togethergreen.org.While the video uses a humorous tone to convey the message, the issue of protecting nesting birds and their habitats is actually quite serious. With Labor Day weekend approaching many people will choose to celebrate the holiday weekend at the beach. Birds are already there—terns, skimmers, oystercatchers, plovers— nesting on the beach and trying to raise their chicks. It’s a critical time for coastal birds and there’s no better time to help protect our Atlantic coast and the birds that depend on it every year. The National Audubon Society has compiled the following guide on sharing the beach with nesting birds, so hopefully you can avoid making the same missteps as Nolan on his first date.Atlantic Coast Birds Need Beaches • Birds nest on beaches throughout the Atlantic coast, often on the same beaches that are popular with visitors for the Labor Day holiday. The breeding season is April through the end of August. • The greatest threats to beach-nesting birds are human disturbance and habitat loss. • It only takes a few minutes in the hot summer sun for little chicks to die from temperature stress. • The most endangered shorebird along the Atlantic Coast in the continental U.S. today include the Piping Plover (federally threatened). • Least Terns, Common Terns, Black Skimmers and American Oystercatchers are listed in many Atlantic Coast states as threatened or special concern species.Simple Ways You Can HelpWhen people help shorebirds by sharing the beach, they are rewarded with the spectacle of wild birds including the opportunity to observe the excitement that unfolds with every nesting season. These are some simple steps you can take to help coastal birds.• Enjoy the sanctioned and approved firework celebrations. Impromptu fireworks in the vicinity of nesting areas can be devastating for birds. • Respect protected areas and signs. Birds, eggs, nests and chicks are well-camouflaged and disturbance by people and their pets can cause birds to abandon their eggs and chicks, leaving them vulnerable to predators and extreme temperatures. • Avoid disturbing groups of birds that are nesting or feeding. If birds take flight, call loudly or act agitated it means you are too close. • Keep your dog on a leash and away from the birds. Coastal birds perceive people and pets as predators and leave their nest or chicks. • Please don’t leave trash or fishing line on the beach. Take your trash with you and place in an appropriate trash container. Trash attracts real predators such as gulls, crows, raccoons and foxes. Fishing line entangles and kills birds. • Please do not fly kites near nesting and feeding areas. This will cause birds to leave their nests or chicks leaving them vulnerable to predators and extreme temperatures, which can kill them.last_img read more

Read More

Calgary home to new art gallery featuring works by Indigenous artists

first_imgChris Stewart APTN National NewsIn Calgary, Inuit and First Nations artists will have a new place to show and sell their work.The owner of the new gallery says she wants to help promote Indigenous artists.last_img

Read More

Qatari advocate for people with disabilities named expert of UN commission for

Sheikha Hessa bint Khalifa bin Ahmed al-Thani was named the Commission’s Special Rapporteur on Disability for 2003 to 2005. The newly appointed Rapporteur is a founding member of the Qatari National Committee for People with Special Needs, which was established in 1998 by Sheikha Moza bint Naser Al-misnad, the consort of the Emir of Qatar, and has been serving as a Vice-President of the Committee since 1999. The task of the Special Rapporteur is to monitor implementation of the Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities, adopted by the General Assembly in 1993, and to advance the status of people with disabilities throughout the world. The first Special Rapporteur, Bengt Lindqvist of Sweden, was appointed in 1994, and his mandate was renewed twice, in 1997 and 2000, by resolutions of the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC). read more

Read More

Security operations by Myanmar show established pattern of domination over ethnic groups

Yanghee Lee, the UN Special Rapporteur on the human rights situation in Myanmar, has just wrapped up a mission that was limited to Thailand and Bangladesh, and did not include Myanmar as its Government has denied her all access to the country and withdrawn cooperation for the duration of her tenure.Speaking at a press conference on her visit, held in Seoul, Republic of Korea, Ms. Lee said that recent reports of attacks against civilians, homes, places of worship and villagers; sexual violence; arbitrary arrests; and torture and enforced disappearances “are acts that have been alleged against the military and security forces for generations.”“I was told repeatedly by the other ethnic groups I spoke to – be they Kachin, Karen, Karenni, or Shan – that they have suffered the same horrific violations at the hands of the Tatmadaw over several decades and – in the case of some groups – continuing today,” she added.“While reports from Rakhine state have rightly provoked international outrage; for many in Myanmar, they have elicited a tragic sense of déjà vu.”The UN Special Rapporteur also highlighted that the scale of violence in the ethnic areas of Myanmar was a continuing erosion of democratic space, and that the civilian Government has failed to bring about openness and transparency and is instead “persisting with repressive practices of the past.”Turning to possible returns of the hundreds of thousands of refugees hailing from the Muslim minority Rohingya community, she underscored that for returns to be ever realized in a voluntary, safe, dignified and sustainable manner is for the Rohingya to be treated as equals – “[as] citizens of Myanmar with all the rights that that status affords.”Equality, added the UN expert is critical for Myanmar to be free from violence that has affected its communities throughout the past.She also called on the international community to pressure Myanmar to create conditions for the refugees before it is too late.“This must be done in a principled way that prioritizes the need for these people to be recognized as Rohingya and as citizens of Myanmar,” she said.Ms. Lee said she hoped to regain access to Myanmar and said that she remains ready to work with the Government and other stakeholders to promote and protect the human rights of all people in the country.UN Special Rapporteurs and independent experts are appointed by the Geneva-based Human Rights Council – the highest UN intergovernmental body on all matters related to human rights – to examine and report back on a specific human rights theme or a country situation.The positions are honorary and the experts are not UN staff, nor are they paid for their work. read more

Read More

Kenny Guiton breaks Ohio State record for singlegame touchdown passes

Redshirt-senior quarterback Kenny Guiton looks to throw in the first half against Florida A&M. Guiton set the OSU school-record for touchdown passes in a game by tossing six in the first half.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorOhio State redshirt-senior quarterback Kenny Guiton threw six touchdown passes in the first half of Saturday’s game against Florida A&M, setting the single-game school record for touchdown passes.Guiton broke the record on a 15-yard touchdown pass to Evan Spencer with five seconds remaining in the first half. He completed 24 of his first 34 passes for 215 yards and six touchdowns with one interception. The Buckeyes took a 55-0 lead into halftime.The record was previously held by Bobby Hoying, who completed five touchdown passes in a game against Pittsburgh in 1995 and Purdue in 1994, and John Borton, who threw five touchdown passes against Washington State in 1952.Guiton, who won the Walter Camp Offensive Player of the Week after completing 21 of 32 passes for 276 yards and four touchdowns in the Buckeyes’ 52-34 win at California, started in place of injured junior quarterback Braxton Miller. read more

Read More

Statistical rejig boosts UK life expectancy by three years but increases are

first_imgIt means that men and women born in the past three years will spend 20.4 per cent and 23.1 per cent of their lives in poor health respectively. A new way of measuring life expectancy has effectively added an extra three years of life to both men and women.Traditionally, the ONS report life expectancy in terms of the mean average age of people when they die. Men in the UK are now expected to live for 79.2 years from birth compared to 82.9 years for women on this measure.However, this mean average figure was accompanied for the first time today by a median figure detailing the age by which half of a hypothetical cohort of people would be dead.This measure probably gives a better indication of how long somebody born in a given year is likely to live because the median is less affected by people dying at very old or very young ages.Encouragingly, the new median figure is higher than the mean life expectancy for both men and women, with the figure for men standing at 82.3 years and the figure for women 85.8 years across the UK as a whole.This works out as an additional 3.1 years of life for men and 2.9 years of life for women compared to the mean. Life expectancy increases are drying upLife expectancy increases have plummeted over the past decade with women gaining just 1.6 months in the past five years. Between 2006 and 2011 life expectancy from birth increased by more than a year for men and by nine months for women.The amount of life gained in each subsequent rolling five-year period has dropped consistently with men enjoying just an additional three months of expected life and women just 1.6 months.center_img Chris White, Principal Research Officer at the Office for National Statistics said: “This analysis supports the view that mortality improvements in the UK have slowed somewhat in the second decade of the 21st century.”This is evidenced by the rate of improvement in life expectancy at birth in the UK falling by 75.3 per cent for males and 82.7 per cent for females when comparing the first half of the second decade with the first half of the first decade.”The median has increased at roughly the same rate as the mean for both men and women since 2011.While life expectancy seems to be stalling, the proportion of our lives that are spent in self-reported good health is decreasing. The ONS found that women born between 2014 and 2016 are expected to spend 19.2 years in poor health, up from 18.6 years for women born between 2009-11. For men, the figure increased from 15.8 years to 16.2 years over the same period. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Read More

New coal technologies – tell the coal mining world your news

first_imgThis year’s World Coal article in International Mining’s August issue will focus on new technologies introduced in the past year, covering underground and surface mine extraction, bulk material handling, safety and communications systems, mine planning and coal preparation. Please submit editorial for consideration of inclusion in the article to john@im-mining.com. Send 500 to 800 words of technical information on new products (or services) and a picture or diagram please.last_img

Read More

Love is a drug rosetinted glasses Heres the science behind falling for

first_img Image: Maksim Fesenko via Shutterstock Feb 14th 2018, 6:01 AM Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Image: Maksim Fesenko via Shutterstock 16,483 Views Wednesday 14 Feb 2018, 6:01 AM WHAT HAPPENS TO your head when you’re in love?If you feel like you can’t concentrate, are slightly stressed or like love is akin to a drug addiction, not only are you not alone but there’s a scientific reason for all of those confusing reactions.Fascinating global studies have tested the exact effect attraction has in animals with the hope that it sheds some light onto how it might affect us. Among those studies are this one from the University of California, San Francisco (2012), that found male fruit flies who were sexually rejected drank four times as much alcohol as the male fruit flies that mated with female fruit flies.Another Californian study, which examined jealousy in titi monkeys, found that males who spent the most time looking at their partner mate with another monkey had increased brain activity in areas associated with social pain and stress.Although unrestrained jealousy can have negative health effects, it can also play a positive role in signaling that your partner might need attention.Dr Sabina Brennan, an award-winning psychologist at Trinity Brain Health and the ADAPT Centre at Trinity College told TheJournal.ie ahead of Valentine’s Day a little bit about the chemicals that are released in our brains when we’re attracted to someone, or when we fall in love.Love is a drug Source: Africa Studio via Shutterstock“Being in love is rewarding,” Dr Brennan said. ”That’s because high-levels of dopamine are released during attraction and dopamine gets the reward system in the brain going.”Dopamine is a ‘chemical messenger’ in the brain that affects your emotions and sensations of pleasure and pain – it’s known as the “feel-good” neurotransmitter.Areas of the brain rich in dopamine become more active when people are shown photos of people they are romantically involved with compared to when they are show photos of acquaintances.It’s also associated with the highs that you see in cocaine and heroin addictions.“It turns out that the areas of the brain activated by intense love are the same areas that drugs use to reduce pain,” an author of the Stanford study that examined this said. Share39 Tweet Email3 center_img ‘Love is a drug’, ‘rose-tinted glasses’: Here’s the science behind falling for someone Your stomach’s in knots, your heart flutters – but here’s what happens to your brain when you’re in love. https://jrnl.ie/3849754 Short URL “When thinking about your beloved, there is intense activation in the reward area of the brain – the same area that lights up when you take cocaine, the same area that lights up when you win a lot of money.”I can’t think straightIf you’ve ever been so in love that you can’t eat or sleep, that’s probably related to another chemical (noradrenaline) which is released when you’re attracted to someone.The noradrenaline gives us a bit of a high, which makes us feel a bit giddy and gives us extra energy. It also reduces our appetite and can interfere with sleep.Touch of your love Source: Peter Bernik via ShutterstockThere’s another chemical reaction that sparks a feeling of bonding during skin-to-skin contact.Oxytocin, nicknamed the love hormone, is released during sex in order to make couples bond, and is associated with feelings of calm, contentedness and security.“It heightens feelings of attachment and helps couples feel closer to one another,” Brennan says.Vasopressin, meanwhile, is associated with behaviour that leads to produces long-term, monogamous relationships.Stressed-outA steroid hormone associated with the fight or flight response (cortisol), can create feelings of stress in the initial phases of falling in love with someone.“Cortisol helps us to cope with challenge and change in our lives, and gives us that little push that we need to get out of bed in the morning,” Brennan says. “So a little extra may be needed to cope with the challenge of attraction or falling in love – it might also explain feelings of excitement.”Rose-tinted glassesIf your friend falls for a person and seem oblivious to what might be an obvious flaw, it’s not entirely their fault.“Interestingly as cortisol levels rise, levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin become depleted. Which might seem surprising since serotonin is often referred to as the happy hormone, involved in mood and appetite.“People who live with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder also have low levels of serotonin – as a consequence some scientists have speculated that reduction in serotonin is what can lead to the obsessing and infatuation that can be part of the early stages of love.”It’s suspected that this is the reason why people in love aren’t able to think about anything else, and being totally preoccupied with the object of your affection.In addition to that, the two neural pathways in the brain associated with negative emotions are deactivated during romantic love, shutting down the mechanisms in the brain that allow us to make critical assessments of people we’re romantically involved with.In short, the parts of the brain associated with fear and the critical assessment of other people, including the person you’re with shut down when attracted to someone or when falling in love. “It’s kind of the neurological explanation for ‘love is blind’,” Brennan says.Careful now.Read: Bid to find a Valentine for Romeo, world’s ‘loneliest frog’ who risks extinctionRead: A decade of innovation: How Science Gallery Dublin transformed into a global success 11 Comments By Gráinne Ní Aodhalast_img read more

Read More

Reforms approved for next bailout

Read More

Leopard scare grips areas at Kukatpally

first_imgHyderabad: Leopard scare gripped densely populated Pragathinagar and Gajularamaram area at Kukatpally here. Local people reportedly heard the roar of the leopard and some more said they had sighted it. According to a resident, Ravi Teja, he had spotted the leopard and immediately informed the Forest officials. He reported to the officials that it was seen near a hill area where it stayed for 5-10 minutes and it started roaring. The people reported that they had the leopard roar after 7 pm also. Advertise With Us The areas where the leopard was sighted is in close proximity to Suraram-Narsapur forest area. It is suspected that it could have strayed into the colonies from the forest area. A watchman at Mithilanagar also reported to have spotted the leopard behind an apartment. At first, he had thought that it was cat. He, however, had realised that it was a leopard after hearing it roar. Advertise With Us The people in the areas have been keeping a vigil. A group of residents armed with sticks are seen going round the colonies. Around 200 residents who have formed themselves into teams are on guard. The migrant labourers, who are staying in temporary shelters, have been alerted to be cautious. The Forest officials, who visited the colonies on receiving complaint, found no evidence of movement of leopard. The officials said they would maintain vigilance to allay fears of people. Earlier also the shepherds also complained of a leopard moving in some areas in Ranga Reddy district and killing sheep and cows. The Forest officials had recently trapped a leopard after painstaking efforts on ICRISAT premises.last_img read more

Read More

Hong Kong airport says flights cancelled due to protests

first_imgHONG KONG: Hong Kong airport authorities cancelled all remaining departing and arriving flights at the major travel hub on Monday after thousands of protesters entered the arrivals hall to stage a demonstration. “Other than the departure flights that have completed the check-in process and the arrival flights that are already heading to Hong Kong, all other flights have been cancelled for the rest of today,” the airport authority said in a statement. Also Read – Watch: Donald Trump says Florida faces absolute monster hurricane Advertise With Us The decision came after thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators flooded into the airport holding signs reading “Hong Kong is not safe” and “Shame on police”. “Airport operations at Hong Kong International Airport have been seriously disrupted as a result of the public assembly at the airport today,” the statement said. It warned that traffic to the airport was “very congested” and the facility’s car parks were completely full. “Members of the public are advised not to come to the airport.”last_img read more

Read More

Aldine ISD Highlighted As Case Study In Perseverance In School Turnaround

first_img X Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /03:41 Laura IsenseeMath specialist Kristin Davis leads a weekly collaborative planning session with all the fourth grade math teachers at Bussey Elementary in Aldine.For decades, educators have struggled to improve low-performing schools. The Obama Administration tried to help and pumped $3 billion dollars into them—with minimal results.But in Aldine, just north of Houston, some say turnaround efforts are paying off and provide an example in the “rewards of perseverance.”“Nobody has quite cracked the code yet on how do you do this district-wide,” said Karen Baroody, partner and managing director of Education Resource Strategies. She’s studied Aldine schools intensely.“And Aldine was remarkable to us because they have been able to improve performance across all the schools in the district consistently and sustainably,” she said. ERS, a Boston-based nonprofit that works with urban schools, highlighted the Aldine Independent School District as a national case study in school turnaround efforts.Laura IsenseeBilingual teacher Pamela Pontvianne and Bussey Elementary assistant prinicpal Miriam Acosta join the weekly math planning session. Aldine ISD has put more focus on teacher support and professional development, according to a recent case study.It’s the latest national attention for Aldine ISD, which won the Broad Prize for urban education in 2009 and was also named this year one of the top 10 rising districts in a report funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.In its case study, ERS analyzed data and interviewed dozens of people. But first, it looked at Aldine’s history: Back in 1995, many of its high schools were rated low-performing.“I think it was really a wake-up call for them, that we need to do something different,” Baroody said.Consider these numbers from 1994-2014:The rate of Aldine students scoring proficient on their academics has jumped 20 percentage points;The racial achievement gap has shrunk by double digits, from over 30 percentage points to 12;And these gains happened while the number of low-income students grew nearly 30 percentage from 55 to 85 percent of enrollment.So how did Aldine do that?To start, any school turnaround takes political will, according to Gary Henry, a professor at Vanderbilt University.“One of the things that they’ve clearly demonstrated is they’ve overcome the inertia of lack of political will to do something on behalf of the kids that they’re serving and that’s usually one of the hardest things for a district to do,” Henry said.He said that school districts then need the resources and capacity to really improve low-performing schools. And it takes time.“It’s a long haul,” Henry said. “There’s no silver bullet that’s a quick-fix turnaround. By replacing the personnel in the school, you’re not necessarily going to get the effects. So if the districts decide to go into this, they should pursue it over the long haul.”Laura IsenseeTeacher Melissa Trujillo coaches third grade students in congruent shapes. About 80 percent of students at Bussey Elementary are English language learners.In its observation, ERS found Aldine has put in the time, with a series of changes over several years.One major change has been professional development for teachers, according to educators in the district and the recent case study from ERS.At Bussey Elementary on Airline Drive, teachers meet for weekly collaborative planning sessions. Think of it as a class for teachers.“This week, everyone should be finishing up fixed and variable expenses,” Kristin Davis said at a recent session. She is the math specialist at Bussey, which enrolls more than 1,000 students. At this session, a group of fourth grade math teachers prepped for a lesson in financial literacy: profit and savings plans.Second-year teacher Reasha Burton suggested connecting the financial literacy lesson to what’s going on at school.“They already know that we’re raising money to try to fix the playground, so they know this is what we’re doing, and whatever is the excess that’s the profit that’s for the school,” she said.Then bilingual teacher Pamela Pontvianne and Collandra Bell joined in.“Money market funds, savings bonds — There’s a lot we need to expose them to because they’re going to put those into word problems,” Pontvianne said, thinking of her English language learners.“That’s the hardest part, even for us adults, is knowing what all these words mean,” Bell said.On top of this collaborative planning, Aldine ISD standardized its curriculum and instruction, gave teachers and principals more support and added extra tutoring for students.“It’s provided pretty much more consistency so it’s the same between department to department, from school to school,” said Kathy Sandoval, Bussey Elementary’s principal and a 27-year veteran of Aldine schools.She set up weekly planning sessions for all her teachers when she became principal at Bussey last year. She said that teacher support is essential to school turnaround.“That’s just like in any business. If you don’t help support and help educate your teams, you’re not going to be as successful,” Sandoval said.She added that Aldine isn’t done yet. It wants to keep improving. Sharelast_img read more

Read More

Gear up for 8th edition of Kathakar

first_imgEveryone loves hearing a good story, believes performance storyteller-author Shaguna Gahilote, who in 2011 conceptualised ‘Kathakar’, an oral storytelling festival. Its eighth edition, featuring noted names in various genres, will kick off from November 16-18 at Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts (IGNCA). Morning sessions will be organised for school children while the evening sessions can be attended by people of all age groups. One of the highlights of the festival will include well-known spiritual figure Sadhguru, founder of Isha Foundation, turn into a storyteller during a session with musician Mohit Chauhan. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfFilmmaker Imtiaz Ali and musician Mohit Chauhan will come together to relive memories over kisse’s of Rocksar and kahani’s from childhood. Noted theatre artist Danish Hussain will present an adaptation of ‘Qissa Urdu Ki Aakhri Kitaab Ka’, originally written by Pakistani poet Ibn-e-Insha. Festival co-director Shaguna Gahilote will dramatise the story of Mahatma Gandhi, through a session on ‘Bapu Ki Kahani’, to mark 150 years of the Indian independence leader’s birth anniversary. International storytellers include Godfrey Duncan, who is man behind the storytelling revival in UK, Michal Malinowski, who has helped keep alive the art of storytelling in Poland and Xanthe Gresham and Oxford University alumnus who from teaching to drama went on to become a renowned storyteller. The overseas participants will narrate tales from Africa, Iran, Poland, Greece and India. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe list of Indian storytellers will also include the Phad storytellers from Rajasthan, Pandavani by the powerhouse Ritu Verma, the energetic performance of Shivaji’s Tales in Powada singing, among others. The three-day festival will showcase some of the rare arts forms from India – the dolls theatre by Sudip Gupta from Kolkata; Phad, the scroll storytellers from Rajasthan; Powada, the vibrant storytelling of Shivaji’s tales; and Pandvani by Ritu Verma (who has collaborated with storytellers in the UK). Michal Malinowski, Director of The Storytelling Museum of Poland, will be bringing legends and myths from the European country. To commemorate 150 years of the birth of Mahatma Gandhi, Shaguna Gahilote will be performing ‘Bapu Ki Kahani’. Noted theatre artist Danish Hussain will present an adaptation of ‘Qissa Urdu Ki Aakhri Kitaab Ka’, originally written by Pakistani poet Ibn-e-Insha. “Getting children, and even adults, to pick up books is slightly hard. So I started doing these oral storytelling sessions in schools. They were hooked and started seeing books as treasures where stories could be found,” Gahilote, who helms the festival with her sisters Prarthana and Rachna Gahilote, said. Gahilote, who will perform “Bapu Ki Kahani” to commemorate 150 years of Mahatma Gandhi’s birth, reiterated that everyone loves to hear a good story and it is something everyone connects to, despite the age. The three-day festival will have spiritual guru Sadhguru, founder of Isha Foundation, in conversation with noted music composer-songwriter Mohit Chauhan, a statement by the organisers said. “Like music, storytelling is the simplest of art forms and also the greatest carrier and upholder of culture. Their shelf life is infinite too,” Chauhan said in a statement. “It will also curate Indian art forms such as the dolls theatre by Sudip Gupta from Kolkata; Rajasthan’s ‘phad’ (scroll) storytelling by Kalyan Joshi; ‘Powada’, the vibrant storytelling of Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj’s tales by Adinath Bapurao Vibhute; and the ‘pandavani’ tales (about the Pandava brothers of Mahabharata) by Ritu Verma,” the statement read. Noted theatre artist Danish Hussain will also present a contemporary adaptation of ‘Qissa Urdu Ki Aakhri Kitaab Ka’, originally written by Pakistani poet Ibn-e-Insha.last_img read more

Read More

Four vehicle accident on major StokeonTrent road

first_imgPunter found hiding in bushes Driver named following fatal collision Dad slams ‘disgusting’ hospital window Get the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailWe’re getting reports of issues in Fenton due to an accident involving four vehicles this afternoon. The collision has taken place on Victoria Road, with traffic data company Inrix reporting it has taken place between Maud Street and Edward Street. Eyewitnesses and Inrix report police and firefighters are at the scene. Traffic is said to be moving slowly in the area with some reports suggesting the road is completely blocked. Motorists are advised to seek alternative routes. The accident is understood to have happened at around 1.15pm (Sunday April 28). We will update you when more information becomes available. Read MoreTop stories on StokeonTrentLivecenter_img Police search for missing woman Follow StokeonTrentLive Download our app  – You can download our free app for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store , or get the Android version from Google Play .  Follow StokeonTrentLive on Facebook –   Like our Facebook page to get the latest news in your feed and join in the lively discussions in the comments. Click here to give it a like! Follow us on Twitter –   For breaking news and the latest stories,  click here to follow SOTLive on Twitter . Follow us on Instagram – Featuring pictures past and present from across Stoke-on-Trent, North Staffordshire & South Cheshire – and if you tag us in your posts, we could repost your picture on our page! We also put the latest news in our Instagram Stories.  Click here to follow StokeonTrentLive on Instagram .last_img read more

Read More

Update 7 fatalities including children in horror crash

first_imgA sixth person died while medics were trying to resuscitate them, and a seventh person is said to have died on the way to hospital.Read full story HEREClick to receive news links via WhatsApp. Or  for the latest news, visit our webpage or follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Join us there! WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite Seven people, including children, lost their lives in a horror accident in the Scheepersnek area just outside Vryheid on Saturday morning (February 25).Two light motor vehicles and a truck were involved in the crash.Also read: Bad road conditions surrounding LadysmithAlso read: Warning: Road closure after truck crashes along Van Reenen’s Pass.Five people were declared dead at the scene.last_img read more

Read More

read more

first_img News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:33Loaded: 2.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:33 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. News | August 13, 2009 Siemens Hits the Books Highlighting Clinical Education at AHRA News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 08, 2019 Half of Hospital Decision Makers Plan to Invest in AI by 2021 August 8, 2019 — A recent study conducted by Olive AI explores how hospital leaders are responding to the imperative read more The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.  The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Technology | Cybersecurity | August 07, 2019 ScImage Introduces PICOM ModalityGuard for Cybersecurity ScImage Inc. is bridging the gap between security and functionality with the introduction of the PICOM ModalityGuard…. read more Related Contentcenter_img Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more News | Electronic Medical Records (EMR) | August 01, 2019 DrChrono Teams With DeepScribe to Automate Medical Note Taking in EHR DrChrono Inc. and DeepScribe announced a partnership so medical practices using DrChrono EHR can use artificial… read more News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more August 13, 2009 – Siemens Healthcare is showcasing in booth 809-811 its comprehensive portfolio of clinical training and continuing education. Siemens offers a variety of educational offerings tailored to our customer’s needs and requirements – when, where, and how they need it. From the virtual education to onsite and classroom training, to printed self-study programs, Siemens provides imaging and therapy professionals with a variety of traditional and alternative learning methods to accommodate multiple learning preferences. For more information: www.usa.siemens.com/clinicaleducation FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Videos | Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President … read more News | Radiology Business | August 01, 2019 Philips Completes Acquisition of Carestream Health’s HCIS Business … read morelast_img read more

Read More

VIDEO Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption Model

first_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Radiology Imaging View all 288 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Videos | Enterprise Imaging | March 22, 2018 VIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption Model Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Kim Garriott, principal consultant, healthcare solutions, at Logicalis Healthcare Solutions, describes the remaining obstacles to enterprise imaging adoption and explains how the new DIAM for Enterprise Imaging, launched at HIMSS18, can provide a roadmap for future technology adoption. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Find more SCCT news and videos Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 10:06Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -10:06 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2017VIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Women’s Health View all 62 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Information Technology View all 220 items Recent Videos View all 606 items Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Technology Reports View all 9 items Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Conference Coverage View all 396 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

Read More

Viranga Bandara

first_imgAs a country, we have been participating in OTM for the last few years. This time, we had around 32 sellers with us. As far as the response is concerned, the numbers have gradually increased with each edition of OTM. I must thank the organising team for such an event and we are looking forward to participate in future editions as well.last_img

Read More

British Airways BA has launched new flights to P

first_imgBritish Airways (BA) has launched new flights to Paphos in Cyprus from Gatwick, London.This is the first time the carrier has offered flights from the UK to the western part of the island nation.BA expects the route to prove popular with tourists, as well as British ex-pats living in Paphos.The inaugural flight was celebrated with a red carpet reception, and a free bottle of Cypriot wine was handed to every passenger.Thomas Cook Airlines revealed in May that it would add flights to Cyprus from its new base at Leeds Bradford Airport. The arrival of a new Airbus A320 will see 17 new routes added at the Yorkshire airport.In May, low-cost carrier Jet2 announced eight new routes planned for Leeds Bradford International Airport to Europe including a flight to Paphos.ReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Map RelatedAir Berlin adds Cyprus flightsAir Berlin adds Cyprus flightsJet2 launches first flight in Leeds Bradford expansionJet2 launches first flight in Leeds Bradford expansionThomas Cook Airlines takes off at Leeds BradfordThomas Cook Airlines takes off at Leeds Bradfordlast_img read more

Read More

by The Associated Press Posted Mar 25 2019 10

first_img by The Associated Press Posted Mar 25, 2019 10:44 am PDT Tate exhibition looks at Van Gogh’s early years in London LONDON — Vincent Van Gogh left behind just one painting of a British scene, but a new exhibition shows that London was a big influence on the Dutch artist.The exhibition at Tate Britain charts the time Van Gough spent in the city as a young man between 1873 and 1876. In London, he worked as an apprentice art dealer, read the novels of Charles Dickens and sketched the River Thames at dusk.Tate Britain director Alex Farquharson said Monday that Van Gogh hadn’t started painting yet but “the idea was sown then, while in London.”The exhibition, which opens Wednesday and runs until Aug. 11, includes some of Van Gogh’s best-known paintings, including “Starry Night Over The Rhone” and “Sunflowers.”His only surviving piece featuring London, 1890’s “Prisoners Exercising”, also is in the exhibit.The Associated Press Staff members look at ‘Self-Portrait’ (1889) by Vincent van Gogh during the preview for the upcoming Van Gogh and Britain exhibition at Tate Britain, London, Monday March 25, 2019. The Van Gogh and Britain exhibition takes a new look at the artist through his relationship with Britain, and how he was inspired by British art, literature and culture. (Victoria Jones/PA via AP) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Emaillast_img read more

Read More