Category: ukusiftf

African delegation

first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaRepresentatives of nine African countries toured University of Georgia research facilities and commercial farms April 26-29. They wanted to learn more about Georgia agriculture and investigate potential partnerships in the state.The delegation included the minister of agriculture from Angola and Washington-based ambassadors from Senegal, Tanzania, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Mauritius and Mozambique. Tim Williams, a researcher with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, organized the tour.”There was intense interest to come and see what is happening in Georgia,” said Williams, who also coordinates the Peanut Collaborative Research Support Program at UGA.Poverty is a problem for many of these countries, he said. For some, as much as 95 percent of the population survives solely on 1 to 2 acres of land. Many live on $2 per day, he said.”You would have to go back to the days of sharecropping in the United States to get an idea of how farming is done in some of these countries,” Williams said.Agricultural tourThe delegation toured an egg processing operation in Jasper County and a broiler facility in Oglethorpe County in northeast Georgia.They visited a UGA broiler microprocessing facility in Athens, Ga. It matches industry standards and provides a place for students to learn all areas of poultry processing. They work to develop new poultry food products there, too.”The delegation wished to see and hear about poultry in Georgia because they knew it was important in the state and that it was an efficient and wholesome protein source that might help the food and nutrition situation in their countries,” said Mike Lacy, head of the CAES poultry science department.The delegation went to the UGA campus in Griffin, Ga., to learn about food science research and about Peanut CRSP projects to combat aflatoxin, a group of potentially deadly toxins produced by fungi. It can appear in peanuts, corn and other crops.”Aflatoxin exposure is a serious problem for many developing countries,” Williams said.In south Georgia, the delegation toured new climate-controlled peanut warehouses in Wilcox County. And on the UGA campus in Tifton, Ga., they learned how peanuts, cotton and vegetables are grown and marketed in Georgia.Productive relationsMozambique Ambassador Armando Panguene wants to develop relationships between his country and learning institutions across the United States. He hopes this will help his country grow. About 80 percent of the population there works on farms.Mozambique farmers, he said, need to learn how to increase their production. But this will depend on developing new markets. “The markets for our production are very limited,” he said.Mozambique has traditionally been linked to Europe, Panguene said. “But now the U.S. is a new market we want to explore.””If we can work and trade with these countries and help them develop,” Williams said, “it would benefit all by making these countries less dependent on food assistance. … And there is much we can learn from them.”UGA, the Partnership to Cut Hunger and Poverty in Africa and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service sponsored the diplomats’ visit.last_img read more

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Chilean Lieutenant Colonel Joins Military Exercise at Fort Bragg

first_imgSince 2003, the Armed Forces of the two countries have participated in PANAMAX, sponsored by the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). This exercise involves the operational deployment of forces to protect the Panama Canal and the Central American region. Originally proposed by Chile, PANAMAX was launched as the result of coordinated efforts between Chile, Panama, and the United States, and has grown significantly since it began. Chilean Army Lieutenant Colonel Carlos Parra Meier recently took part in the multi-national Combined Joint Operational Access Exercise 15-01 (CJOAX 15-01), a training operation designed to enhance co-operation and inter-operability among its participants. “Chile and the United States are creating a common vision of security issues in the hemisphere, and this exercise is part of that vision,” said Miguel Navarro, a researcher at the National Academy of Political and Strategic Studies (ANEPE) of Chile. “It’s important for Chile to have interoperability with NATO forces in order to have a more active participation in international operations.” A large airborne operation The exercise, held April 10-21, was the largest U.S.-U.K. bilateral airborne training operation at Fort Bragg in the past 20 years; it featured Paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division’s (82 ABN DIV) – 2nd Brigade Combat Team and about 900 Paratroopers from the United Kingdom’s 3rd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment, 16 Air Assault Brigade. “This Chilean participation in a major military exercise on U.S. soil summarizes all the work of collaboration and cooperation among the two nations. Today, more than ever, strengthening ties and gaining experiences are as vital for a country as it is to have well-trained Army officers in multiple disciplines.” By Dialogo July 02, 2015 Excellent work, this should be the army’s function during peacetime. Saving the new generations and making the future more human. Marines from the 2nd Marine Division at nearby Camp Lejeune, meanwhile, participated in the exercise April 12-17. “More than 2,100 American and British paratroopers jumped into Fort Bragg, North Carolina, on April 13 for the start of a massive exercise,” the fort’s press office reported. They leaped from American C-17s and C-130s as well as Royal Air Force aircraft before moving to seize an airfield, evacuating non-combatants, and executing offensive and defensive operations. Exercises promote inter-operability The CJOAX 15-01 began with a warning and strategic deployment from the nearby Pope Field Air Force base in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Participating Troops performed a Forcible Entry Joint Operation that night, followed by seven days of tactical exercises. Lt. Col. Parra joined in the airborne assault on April 13, and thereafter served in the command post of the Task Force on the Future Operations Department, deployed by the 82 ABN DIV – 2nd Brigade Combat Team and Regiment 3, where he worked with British and U.S. officers. In addition to general training, the exercises also promoted inter-operability; they gave participants the opportunity to learn about each others’ equipment, tactics, and standard operating procedures, according to Lt. Col. Mike Shervington, commander of 3 Para, a Global Response Force U.S./ Military unit, the Army Times reported. The Chilean Army reported that it “continues to position itself with an international presence, in order to enhance its combat capability and working staff for the benefit of multinational interoperability.” In 2014, Military personnel and integrated staff members from Brazil, Belize, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and the United States participated in PANAMAX, which also featured cooperation from the United Nations and Conference of Central American Armies. The exercise at Fort Bragg is not the first time Chile and the United States have cooperated on a Military exercise. These exercises were “quite beneficial, in this case not only to Lt. Col. Parra, who won a real international experience in his field,” but also to Chile in general, said David Rozowski, a security analyst and CEO of Citizen Security Foundation in Chile. Also, Cadets from the Chilean Military School participated in the 49th annual Sandhurst Military Skills Competition at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in April. The Chilean team won fifth place overall in the competition. Chile and U.S. also cooperate in PANAMAXlast_img read more

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A Look Back at the Brutal Winter of 2015

first_imgNow, let’s talk about the dreaded snow. For the season, the weather service measured 56.6 inches of snow at MacArthur Airport, more than double the historic seasonal average of 24.8 inches. With our luck this year, that number may increase. The weather service’s “snowfall season” runs from November through April. The most recent storm to hit LI dumped upwards of 8 inches on the Island, a reminder that although spring is only days away, anything is possible. Here’s the good news: National Weather Service forecast through Wednesday. (Photo credit: National Weather Service)You’re not hallucinating, folks. The reprieve we’ve all been waiting for is upon us. Let’s just hope it stays that way. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York We’re not quite counting our chickens yet, Long Island, but it appears the worst may be behind us—at least we can only hope it is. If Thursday’s winter storm was indeed Old Man Winter’s last hurrah then we’ll gladly put away those over-utilized shovels and box up the salt and sand—all the while letting out a triumphant cheer, the likes of which we haven’t uttered in what seems like ages. As we look ahead to next week’s glorious forecast—sunny skies and temperatures in the 40s (!!) for most of the week—we do so with a bit of trepidation, knowing full well that at any moment Mother Nature can shatter all of our hopes and dreams and unleash copious amounts of snow and brutally cold temperatures on us—something we’ve unfortunately become accustomed to in recent weeks. Sure, this hellish winter may not officially be over, but we feel like it’s our duty to conduct a sort-of post-mortem on Winter 2015. Long Islanders don’t need statistics to back up their point that this winter has been especially unbearable, but we’ll provide some talking points anyway. According to National Weather Service’s Upton office, February was the coldest month on record for Long Island (temperature readings are taken at Long Island MacArthur Airport), going back to 1984, when the agency officially began to record data. The average temperature in February was a skin-piercing 21.6 degrees. February’s stunning temperatures are even more mind blowing when you consider temperature readings at Central Park, where records date back to 1869. Central Park posted an average daily temperature of 23.9, making it the third coldest February over the 146-year period that records have been kept, and the ninth coldest month overall. The average temperature of 24.6 captured at John F. Kennedy International Airport (records date back to 1948) made it the coldest February on record, and second coldest month overall. last_img read more

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Filene: Troubling drift in CU corporate governance

first_img 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Keith LeggettIn 2010, the Filene Institute released an interesting study on corporate governance at U.S. and Canadian credit unions.The report found that there “is a troubling drift away from truly cooperative and democratic governance.”The report argued that there is a failure by credit union members, who own the assets, to participate in running their credit unions. It is management that drives the change process at credit unions.This decline in member involvement has arisen at the same time as the common bond has been diluted. The liberalization of the common bond has fueled credit union membership and asset size growth requiring professional managers.For example, the study found that less than 1 percent of U.S. credit union members attended the annual general meeting.The study also found unsurprisingly that for the vast majority of credit unions the number of candidates for the board of directors is the same as the number of vacancies. The authors concluded that “competition for board positions … is not intense… and once one is nominated, achieving a position on the board is a formality.” continue reading »last_img read more

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Creative ways you can energize your staff and yourself

first_imgI don’t know about you, but even after a good night’s sleep, by around 3pm, I feel sluggish. In today’s world, the average employee has so many balls in the air, it’s inevitable leaders are faced with an exhausted workforce. To get yourself and your staff up and moving, try these creative ways to spark that creative energy and enthusiasm.First, check inSchedule a team sit down to evaluate where everyone’s energy stands. Ask your team, “Are there certain times of day where you feel more productive?” Establish when the majority feels run-down and ask for feedback on ways everyone can band together to fight off low energy levels. Calibrating what a typical day is like for most will help everyone better plan on how to move forward and get moving.Celebrate the small thingsDon’t let too much time go by between workplace outings and small celebrations. Breaking up the monotony of office life is a surefire way to energize your team and raise employee morale. These don’t have to be expensive affairs that will set the company back. Even simple things like an office picnic or group stroll around town can be refreshing and rewarding.Be randomSure, we thrive on structure. But, going through the day-to-day avoiding any change can sure be a drag. You can still conduct necessary business while still changing things up. Instead of holding your daily (or weekly) team meeting in the conference room, invite your team outdoors or to the local coffee shop. Small changes that still allow the work to be completed will shake things up and demonstrate your desire to keep things creative and new. 32SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Wendy Moody Wendy Moody is a Senior Editor with CUInsight.com. Wendy works with the editorial team to help edit the content including current news, press releases, jobs and events. She keeps … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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3 signs an employee is ready for more

first_img 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Details As a leader, there may not be anything more satisfying that seeing your employees develop into leaders themselves. If you’re hiring the right people and giving them the proper training and experience, this is something that should happen naturally. Some employees won’t embrace a leadership role, but most will jump at the chance to move their careers forward. If you’re looking for the next leader at your credit union, here are a few things to look for…They are always ready for what’s next: Some employees are content doing the same thing day after day. While you can appreciate them for the hard work they do, they’re probably not looking to move into a leadership role. The employees you should keep your eyes on are the ones who love tackling a new assignment and then keep on moving to the next challenge.They are natural-born leaders: There are some skills that just come naturally. Without being prodded, a natural-born leader will emerge in a team environment. They’ll be the ones who aren’t just concentrating on their part of a project but know how each part works together and are focused on making sure that the team is thriving as one. When you look at these employees, you’ll be able to see how much they care about team success.They want to change the game: When you take time to talk to your employees, some will just spit out a bunch of worthless jive so they can get through the conversation and return to work. An employee who is ready for the next level will actually have something to say. Having ideas that will improve work flow or increase profits is a sign of a mind that is ready to take the next step.last_img read more

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How to recruit the next generation of credit union leaders

first_imgThis summer, CreditUnions.com published a four-part series asking established industry professionals for their thoughts on how credit unions can attract up-and-coming leaders to their workforces.Now, it’s time to hear from these emerging leaders themselves. CreditUnions.com tapped HR departments across the United States looking for budding talent making a mark on their organizations.When we found them, we posed these five questions:How did you begin your credit union career? Did you know what one was before you started? continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Mr. President, stop your attacks on the free press

first_imgCPJ documented 21 cases in 2017 in which journalists were jailed on “fake news” charges.Trump’s attempts to undermine the free press also make it more difficult to hold repressive governments accountable.For decades, dissidents and human rights advocates have relied on independent investigations into government corruption to further their fight for freedom.But constant cries of “fake news” undercut this type of reporting and strip activists of one of their most powerful tools of dissent.We cannot afford to abdicate America’s long-standing role as the defender of human rights and democratic principles throughout the world.Without strong leadership in the White House, Congress must commit to protecting independent journalism, preserving an open and free media environment, and defending the fundamental right to freedom of opinion and expression.We can do this by encouraging our partners and allies to review their laws and practices, including the abuse of defamation and anti-terrorism laws, to better protect press freedom and ensure that they do not unduly shrink the space for free speech. Last year, the organization documented 262 cases of journalists being imprisoned for their work.Reporters around the world face intimidation, threats of violence, harassment, persecution and sometimes even death as governments resort to brutal censorship to silence the truth.The committee’s report revealed a bleak global climate for press freedom, as more governments seek to control access to information and limit freedom of opinion and expression.They do this not only by arresting journalists but also by fostering distrust of media coverage and accusing reporters of undermining national security and pride.Governments dub the press the “enemy of the people,” weaken or eliminate their independence, and exploit the lack of serious scrutiny to encroach on individual liberties and freedoms.This assault on journalism and free speech proceeds apace in places such as Russia, Turkey,China, Egypt, Venezuela and many others.Yet even more troubling is the growing number of attacks on press freedom in traditionally free and open societies, where censorship in the name of national security is becoming more common. Britain passed a surveillance law that experts warn chills free speech, and countries from France to Germany are looking to do the same.In Malta, a prominent journalist was brutally murdered in October after uncovering systemic government corruption.In Poland, an independent news outlet was fined (later rescinded) nearly half a million dollars for broadcasting images of an anti-government protest. Unfortunately, the Trump administration’s attitude toward such behavior has been inconsistent at best and hypocritical at worst.While administration officials often condemn violence against reporters abroad, Trump continues his unrelenting attacks on the integrity of American journalists and news outlets.This has provided cover for repressive regimes to follow suit.The phrase “fake news” — granted legitimacy by an American president — is being used by autocrats to silence reporters, undermine political opponents, stave off media scrutiny and mislead citizens. Categories: Editorial, OpinionAfter leaving office, President Ronald Reagan created the Ronald Reagan Freedom Award to recognize individuals who have fought to spread liberty worldwide.Nancy Reagan continued the tradition after her husband’s death, and in 2008 she bestowed the honor on human rights icon Natan Sharansky, who credited Reagan’s strong defense of freedom for his own survival in Soviet gulags.Reagan recognized that as leader of the free world, his words carried enormous weight, and he used it to inspire the unprecedented spread of democracy around the world.President Donald Trump does not seem to understand that his rhetoric and actions reverberate in the same way.He has threatened to continue his attempt to discredit the free press by bestowing “fake news awards” upon reporters and news outlets whose coverage he disagrees with.Whether Trump knows it or not, these efforts are being closely watched by foreign leaders who are already using his words as cover as they silence and shutter one of the key pillars of democracy.According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, 2017 was one of the most dangerous years to be a journalist. We can authorize U.S. foreign assistance to support independent media outlets and programs that create greater media pluralism.We can do more to foster conditions in which freedom of expression and information can thrive, including working to change increasingly political attitudes toward journalism.And we can condemn violence against journalists, denounce censorship and support dissidents and activists as they seek to speak the truth.Ultimately, freedom of information is critical for a democracy to succeed.We become better, stronger and more effective societies by having an informed and engaged public that pushes policymakers to best represent not only our interests but also our values. Journalists play a major role in the promotion and protection of democracy and our unalienable rights, and they must be able to do their jobs freely. Only truth and transparency can guarantee freedom.Sen. John McCain, a Republican, represents Arizona in the U.S. Senate. He wrote this as a special to The Washington Post.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more

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German newspapers fight to rise from ashes of virus crisis

first_imgDigital ‘through the roof’  According to the Association of German Newspaper Publishers (BDZV), there are some reasons to be cheerful about how the sector was affected at the height of the crisis in March, April and May.A recent BDZV report showed that only one in 10 members suffered a dramatic drop in circulation numbers. A quarter said sales were stable and around half managed to limit the decline to between one and five percent. Despite a steady decline in sales in recent years, Germany still sells some 14 million copies of 327 different daily newspapers every day, according to BDZV figures from 2019.This puts daily newspaper sales well ahead of Britain, for example, which has just over nine million, or France  which has six million.On top of that, the country has 17 weeklies and six Sunday editions.The crisis has certainly left its mark: advertising revenues have collapsed, sometimes by as much as 80 percent, and about a third of employees have been laid off, according the BDZV’s Anja Pasquay.But “German newspapers were printed and delivered on time every day”, she points out.And digital subscriptions, which have long lagged behind print sales, have gone “through the roof”.”Publishing houses unanimously told us that projects — especially digital ones — that had been under consideration for months or even years were suddenly successfully implemented within a few weeks,” Pasquay said.Friedrich Kalber, a spokesman for the Axel Springer group, reported record digital subscriptions in March and April for the conservative Die Welt daily and the Bild tabloid, Germany’s best-selling newspaper, though he was unable to give figures.The Sueddeutsche Zeitung sold 150,000 new digital subscriptions in March alone, a level that the center-left Munich newspaper had previously only hoped to achieve by the end of 2020.The coronavirus pandemic has led to a hunger for credible information and a renaissance for traditional media, according to Frank Thomsen, editor of the Stern news magazine.In a survey conducted at the end of May by the ZMG media institute, more than 90 percent of 4,000 respondents rated the news from daily newspapers as “particularly reliable” and best able to guide them through the mass of information on the pandemic. The coronavirus pandemic may have sent advertising revenues plunging worldwide, but Germany’s beloved newspapers expect to emerge winners from the crisis thanks to accelerating digital development and renewed trust in the media.”The newspaper industry has so far come through the crisis relatively well,” said Monique Hofmann, a media specialist with the Verdi trade union in Germany, where more newspapers are sold than in any other European country.”We believe that readers’ demand for information will remain high,” she said, predicting that if it takes advantage of new developments, the industry can “not only survive the crisis, but emerge from it stronger”.center_img Hybrid offers But although the crisis has provided a fillip for digital technology, experts stress that a complete move away from physical sales is not going to be possible in the immediate future.”There are still too many readers who want to hold a newspaper in their hands,” said Frank Ueberall, president of the German Federation of Journalists (DJV) — mainly older people, who make up the majority of newspaper readers in Germany.According to the DJV, only 22 percent of over-50s can imagine getting used to reading their daily news online.This is the nub of the problem for publishing houses: ideally, they would like to do away with physical sales because of high distribution costs, but they depend on them for revenue — and meanwhile they can only attract new, younger customers with digital products.”Delivery of printed newspapers early in the morning will become increasingly expensive and in the medium term, in the worst case, will lead to certain regions in Germany no longer being able to supply local newspapers,” predicts Pasquay, estimating that 40 percent of municipalities will be affected within five years. To retain subscribers, the solution will probably involve hybrid offers, she says, with digital editions during the week and a paper edition at the weekend. Topics :last_img read more

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Jack Wilshere identifies the major change Mikel Arteta has made at Arsenal

first_img FIFA and WHO team up to give you five ways to tackle spread of coronavirusTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 1:43FullscreenFIFA and WHO team up to give you five ways to tackle spread of coronavirushttps://metro.co.uk/video/fifa-team-five-ways-tackle-spread-coronavirus-2131812/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Wilshere is confident Arteta’s three-and-a-half spell as Pep Guardiola’s assistant will stand him in good stead in the hot seat at Arsenal and says supporters should be patient with their new head coach.‘I think you need to give Arteta a transfer window and a pre-season,’ the West Ham midfielder added.‘He needs to get his work in in pre-season whenever that may be this year but I think they will be alright.‘He knows the league, played in the league for years. He was at Man City with arguably the one of the best teams in Premier League history and one of the best managers in Premier League history.’ Advertisement Arteta has lost just two matches as Arsenal manager (Picture: Getty)The north London club have won eight, drawn five and lost just two of Arteta’s 15 matches in charge, racking up a sizeable tally of 23 goals in the process, but Wilshere has been most impressed by the side’s defensive work.Arsenal have conceded just 12 goals in those games and Arteta’s former team-mate sung his praises during an Instagram Live with entrepreneur and personal shopper Sam Morgan on Tuesday afternoon.Asked whether Arsenal operate in a way that will allow them to compete for the title, Wilshere replied: ‘They’ve got world-class players. They spent £60m on [Pierre-Emerick] Aubameyang, £40m on [Alexandre] Lacazette, [Mesut] Ozil is world-class. ‘I think they’ve got a good manager now who can get the best out of them. ‘Everyone who I’ve spoken to since leaving Arsenal or even when I was at Arsenal would say they wouldn’t mind playing against us because they knew they could get opportunities. Going forward we were always a joke. ‘I’m not just talking about the defence but defensively, as a team, they would get chances and I think Arteta has changed that a bit.’ Wilshere has not been surprised by Arteta’s move into management (Picture: Getty)Wilshere has not been surprised by Arteta’s successful start in management considering his ‘unreal’ discipline during their playing days at Arsenal.‘When I was playing with him you don’t really think about that but, when I look back, you could tell,’ Wilshere continued.‘He was one of them guys in training who was always on it. He wouldn’t accept anything less than 100 per cent. AdvertisementAdvertisement‘Even if we were doing possession, he would try and base it around a game and try and talk to you about what we should be doing.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal‘Around the training ground he was first in, never late, he would do everything properly. His discipline was unreal. ‘On the pitch as well, he was the leader for us. In the dressing room and around the place he wouldn’t get involved in any banter. ‘His English was good, he knew the game, he was good. He was a big player for us.’Will Mikel Arteta be a successful manager of Arsenal?Yes0%No0%Share your resultsShare your resultsTweet your resultsFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For more stories like this, check our sport page.MORE: Mesut Ozil ready to take bigger pay cut than his team-mates once Arsenal give further assurancesMORE: Mikel Arteta to push ahead with permanent Pablo Mari transfer as Arsenal shelve Axel Disasi interest Metro Sport ReporterTuesday 21 Apr 2020 5:02 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link2kShares Jack Wilshere identifies the major change Mikel Arteta has made at Arsenal Mikel Arteta has impressed former Arsenal team-mate Jack Wilshere (Picture: Getty)Jack Wilshere has praised Mikel Arteta for the defensive improvements Arsenal have made since he became manager and urged fans to reserve judgement until the Spaniard has been given a transfer window and a pre-season. Unai Emery was relieved of his duties after a dismal start to the campaign both domestically and in the Europa League and the Gunners’ struggles continued under interim boss Freddie Ljungberg which led to Arteta’s appointment at the end of December. Though the coronavirus crisis brought the football season to a halt last month, there’s a feeling of optimism at Arsenal once again after the side’s results picked up significantly under Arteta’s tutelage.AdvertisementAdvertisementRead the latest updates: Coronavirus news liveADVERTISEMENT Advertisement Commentlast_img read more

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