Month: December 2020

Local Cub Scout Pack selling Christmas goods to raise funds

first_imgJOHNSON CITY (WBNG) — Cub Scout Pack 100 sold Christmas trees and wreaths on Sunday at the All Saints Episcopal Church. The wreaths and trees sold for $30 each, but for Snow, Cub Scouts is just a way for him to give back. “It makes me feel good that I can lead young boys [and girls] in a positive direction,” Snow said. Den leader Kevin Snow told 12 News the fundraiser generally brings in close to $2,000 each time, and that the pack has been doing it for all 16 years he’s been involved. Those times are Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday starting at 10 a.m. until the pack runs out.center_img Pack Cubmaster Jason Moore tells 12 News the scouts and leaders will be out next weekend for those who missed trees and wreaths. The next planned outing for the pack is the Winter Mixer in January. Scouts and leaders will be headed to Forest Lake Campground in Truxton, N.Y. The pack’s largest fundraiser of the year was an attempt to raise money for camping trips, food and travel expenses, as well as campground fees for trips and events throughout the year.last_img read more

Read More

Educators seek to get youth interested in careers early

first_imgCarpentry, auto tech, welding and animal care were just a few of the fields students were able to check out. (WBNG) — 5th graders from across the Southern Tier made the trip to Broome-Tioga BOCES Thursday morning. All for a sneak peak into a wide array of careers. Educators say its important to show students all of their options. “I think letting kids know what an electrician does makes a difference and how to become one,” says Principal at the Center for Career and Technical Excellence Matt Sheehan.center_img “Or how to become a carpenter for kids who really like working with their hands. Let’s change their philosophy as they get older,” he said. Over the two-day program more than 1,100 students will make the trip to BOCES to learn about potential careers.last_img read more

Read More

Broome County takes part in March for Meals campaign, how you can help

first_img“I actually got really addicted to it. It’s really awesome getting to work with these elderly people, seeing their lives, and it just really makes an impact,” he said. Hamza Syed got involved with volunteer about four years ago. One way to support the organization is to become a volunteer. It calls on the community to support our local Meals on Wheels programs, which deliver meals to older adults in the area. That kicks off March 16, where location politicians will be out on the streets to see what volunteers do first-hand. And it doesn’t take much to make a difference. Syed says dedicating a whole month to bringing awareness to Meals on Wheels is important. “To bring awareness to the program and the importance of it in the community to help keep older adults independent in their homes for as long as possible,” said Office for Aging Meals on Wheels coordinator Rebecca Morales.center_img “Not a lot of people do this work. It’s usually the same exact people for the past few years. I think I’m one of the youngest people here, so it would be great to see young faces in because we need more people doing this work,” he said. BROOME COUNTY (WBNG) — This month, Broome County is participating in the national March for Meals campaign. Another part of the campaign is “Meals on Wheels Community Champions Week.” “You make a tremendous impact on your community and it doesn’t involve that much time, like an hour and a half a day. And you don’t even have to drive, you can be one of the persons sitting in the car just giving the food out and you are literally changing peoples’ lives and their days,” said Syed. “So they can put a face to the program and see the people we serve, so when they’re out there doing their official duties, they’ll hopefully remember us and the program and the people we serve,” said Morales. If you want to get involved with Meals on Wheels, or know someone who would benefit from it, contact the Office of Aging at (607)778-2411.last_img read more

Read More

Local politicians weigh-in on stimulus package

first_imgFirst, is the money going to health care, which can be flexible based on need. “That is a drop in the bucket, as to need,” the governor said. “I spoke to our House delegation, Congressional delegation, this morning. I said to them, this doesn’t do it.” Second, is the money going to small businesses to keep them afloat, including in the Southern Tier. However, Governor Andrew Cuomo doesn’t think the proposed $3.8 billion will be enough and changes need to be made. “If you’re a small business and you have to close because customers or your workers can’t come in, you will get a low-interest or no-interest loan to keep you going during the crisis. If you keep your employees that loan is forgiven,” said Schumer. (WBNG) — The proposed stimulus package has finally passed the Senate, and local leaders are happy to see progress. “It’s a good thing that Democrats and Republicans are coming together here to pass an economic stimulus package so we can be able to respond to the economic crisis our country is facing right now,” says Representative Anthony Brindisi. Finally, the money going to individuals and families. Outside of that disagreement, the three focal points of this package are what makes most local leaders approve of this package. “Let’s say a hospital needs to hire a nurse who is not working right now, but they need her back because they have new patients and new needs under coronavirus. They’ll be able to pay for childcare if she has a child at home who’s not in school. So she can, or he can come into work,” say Senator Chuck Schumer. “$1,200 for individuals and an additional 500 dollar cash payment per child, I think is a really good thing. It will help a lot of people throughout the Southern Tier,” said Brindisi.last_img read more

Read More

Coronavirus presents additional challenges to cancer patients

first_imgJOHNSON CITY (WBNG) — Cancer patients battling the disease have to take extra precaution amid the coronavirus pandemic. “It’s in the back of my mind but it’s not up front yet, not something I need to stress about,” Brandy tells 12 News. Brandy Davis has been fighting Grade 4 Glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer, since September 2017. “They stay, pretty much even in the house, six feet away from me at most times. She’s (her daughter) had a couple of moments where it’s like mom I want to give you a hug, but I can’t,” Brandy says. “It can get pretty lonely. Like I said, 2 1/2 hours of just sitting there and contemplating anything that goes through my head at that particular point. I like to be kept company during that time, and I can’t right now.” For cancer patients, the coronavirus may not be their biggest worry, and Brandy says her doctors have not brought it up to her because they do not want to add more stress. “When I get to the office, they take my temperature and ask me if I’ve been sick or in contact with anybody that has been,” she says. “If I’m going to get it, I’m going to get it. I take the same thinking that I did when I was diagnosed with cancer, it happened for a reason,” Brandy told 12 News. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says COVID-19 may pose an even bigger threat to those who are immunocompromised. center_img Davis receives avastin injections every two weeks, a form of chemotherapy she has been treating her cancer with for about two years. This treatment typically takes two and a half hours, but with extra safety measures being taken during the COVID-19 outbreak, Brandy has to spend that time alone. Brandy has two children who are also making sacrifices to keep their mother safe. Brandy only leaves her house for doctors appointments, receiving treatment at Broome Oncology. Brandy chooses to keep a positive mindset, even during the most difficult of times. Brandy receives MRI’s every few months to check on the status of her tumor, and said if she needs additional treatment or services, her doctors are there to make sure everything is taken care of amid the COVID-19 crisis. “Like” Nicole Menner on Facebook and “Follow” her on Twitter.last_img read more

Read More

Local doula discusses pregnancy concerns during COVID-19 pandemic

first_img(WBNG) — Between risking contacting COVID-19 and not having access to the necessary support during delivery, local women are looking at other options for giving birth. Doulas provide support in a variety of ways to mothers throughout every step of their pregnancy, including helping moms decide where they want to give birth. For more information on resources for home births, visit some of the links below: “I think the fear of the hospital, and that being the driving factor is really worrisome. Most outcomes are great, and normal, and that’s wonderful, obviously it’s unpredictable,” said Sivers. The CDC reports about one percent of all births in the United States happen at home. However, one local doula says she’s noticed an increased interest in home births. For some, the stress of being pregnant during a pandemic may pose health issues for mothers in the long-term. Sivers says she’s an advocate for home births, having had one herself. However, she says deciding where to have a baby is not a decision that should be made lightly. “We’re going to see a huge change somehow, hopefully I would love to see it for the better, in maternal mental health, during the pregnancy and postpartum,” said Sivers. “Every once in awhile, I’ll get an email or a call, or something on social media, asking about resources for home birth midwives. Just the amount since this pandemic is probably more than I’ve gotten in the past three years in business,” said Nicole Sivers, owner of Doulas of Broome County. “Some are very pregnant already, so it’s not something they would’ve thought about before everything that’s going on,” said Sivers. Broome County Maternal Child Health & DevelopmentDoulas of Broome CountyMothers & Babieslast_img read more

Read More

Report: Men’s college basketball set to begin Nov. 25

first_imgExhibition games and scrimmages will not be played. For a look at the 2020-2021 Binghamton men’s basketball roster, click here. (WBNG) — According to multiple reports, the Division I men’s college basketball season will start November 25. center_img NCAA.com correspondent Andy Katz reports practice can begin October 14. Teams are not allowed to play more than 27 regular season games, but must play a minimum of 13 games. last_img

Read More

Binghamton High School serves community with 25th annual Thanksgiving dinner

first_imgSteve Giannini, Coordinator of the dinner, said, “We just kept running them [dinners] to the door. We had people driving up in the back, walking up in front, and we kept everyone socially distanced so the line looked even longer than it was.” The school celebrated the 25th Annual Community Thanksgiving Dinner Thursday, and even with COVID-19 restrictions, organizers said it was a hit. Students say they were stunned by the number of people that turned out to the dinner, and were happy they could fill a large need. “It went really fast, I could not believe the number of people that were here,” Giannini said. Student volunteers prepared and handed out 500 Thanksgiving dinners for those staying in for the holiday. Organizers say the 500 meals only took a little over an hour to give oout completely. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — Binghamton High School continued a tradition with the community this Thanksgiving, safely serving community members Thanksgiving meals. last_img read more

Read More