Category: lkcahilx

Urban rodeo bringing country and controversy to Montreals Old Port

first_imgMONTREAL – A four-day urban rodeo that is promising to bring a bit of the Wild West to Montreal’s Old Port is also expected to draw daily protests from groups denouncing the event as animal cruelty.The festival, which includes country music shows as well as traditional rodeo contests, aims to provide “an authentic and educational country-inspired experience,” according to the city.But it has also fuelled opposition from animal-rights activists, who say bronc riding and bull riding are cruel and stressful to animals.Two groups plan daily protests outside the site to criticize what they call the inherent cruelty of the events.“Rodeos put animals in very dangerous situations and use the animals’ discomfort to get them to buck and run around,” said Christina Vassilatos, one of the protest co-organizers.“Animals aren’t enjoying any of this.”She said the protests will be peaceful and are being organized in the memory of animals that have died during rodeos.The Montreal SPCA also opposes the rodeo, which began Thursday and ends Sunday and is part of the city’s 375th-anniversary celebrations. A petition the organization launched against the event earlier this summer has more than 26,000 signatures.“Rodeos subject animals to fear, stress, and undue risk of injury or even death, all in the name of so-called ‘entertainment,’” says a statement on the SPCA’s website.The general manager of the Festival Western de St-Tite, which is organizing the rodeo, said the animals are treated well and that a team of veterinarians will be on hand at all times to monitor their welfare.“This is an opportunity for everyone to see our best practices and come to understand the breadth of our sporting competitions,” Pascal Lefreniere said in a statement.“As in St-Tite, animals are treated with the best protocols in force. Their well-being remains a priority for our team.”A legal challenge to stop the Montreal rodeo was dropped in June after opponents of the event reached a deal with organizers to bring in further measures to ensure the well-being of the animals.As part of the deal, a veterinarian and a behavioural specialist will be able to examine the animals before and after each rodeo.The agreement also mandated the creation of a committee composed of government, rodeo and animal-welfare representatives to study the impact of rodeos on animal well-being.last_img read more

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EPA says Pruitts condo lease didnt violate ethics rules

first_imgWASHINGTON – An agency ethics official at the Environmental Protection Agency says Administrator Scott Pruitt’s lease of a Capitol Hill condo tied to a prominent fossil-fuels lobbyist didn’t violate federal ethics rules.A memo signed by Kevin Minoli contends that Pruitt’s $50-a-night rental payments constitute a fair market rate. The memo was dated March 30, the day after ABC News first reported Pruitt lived last year in condo co-owned by the wife of Steven Hart, a registered lobbyist whose firm pushed EPA to relax pollution regulations. Pruitt’s college-aged daughter stayed in the second bedroom while interning at the White House last summer.Minoli’s memo says the $50-a-night rate would total $1,500 for 30 nights a month, which he deemed to be a fair price.Pruitt’s lease, however, required him to pay just for nights he occupied in the unit. Pruitt actually paid a total of $6,100 over the six month period he leased the property, an average of about $1,000 a month.But current rental listings for two-bedroom apartments in the neighbourhood show they typically go for far more than what Pruitt paid. A two bedroom townhome on the same block as the one leased by Pruitt was advertised for rent on Monday at $3,750 a month. Another two-bedroom unit on the next block was advertised as available for $4,740 a month.“The lease authorized use by the administrator and his immediate family, specifically including his spouse and children, and consistent with that provision of the lease his immediate family did stay there when they were in Washington, D.C.,” Minoli wrote. “The lease did not require payment when the property was not utilized. Neither of these two provisions render the rental cost under the lease as something other than market value.”EPA did not provide a copy of Pruitt’s lease and did not respond to questions about how Minoli determined what he considered to be the fair-market rate for the neighbourhood. Also left unanswered was how Pruitt came to rent a property tied to a lobbyist with business interests involving his agency.The unusual arrangement has attracted attention in Washington, where Pruitt has been under increasing scrutiny for this frequent taxpayer-funded travel, which has included first-class airline tickets. Though federal regulations typically require federal officials to fly in coach, the EPA chief has said he needed to sit in premium seats due to security concerns.Jennifer Kaplan, a spokeswoman for EPA’s Inspector General, said Monday the office is evaluating a request to investigate the circumstances surrounding the administrator’s condo lease. The EPA watchdog is already probing Pruitt’s 2017 travel spending.Walter Shaub, who ran the U.S. Office of Government Ethics until last year, rated EPA’s legal justification of Pruitt’s living arrangements as “Total Baloney.” He jokingly tweeted on Friday that he would like to rent the Harts prime location condo for $50-a-night.“I’ll only pay for nights I use it but need it held vacant all other nights,” wrote Shaub, who has become a frequent critic of what he sees as ethical lapses in the Trump administration. “@EPA has certified that these are standard terms at market rate, so it shouldn’t matter to you that I don’t run EPA.”A Republican who previously served as the state attorney general of Oklahoma, Pruitt has long been a champion of the oil and gas industry. In the year he has served as the Trump administration’s top environmental official, Pruitt has moved to scrap, gut or replace numerous environmental regulations opposed by the industry while boosting the continued burning of fossil fuels, which is the primary cause of climate change.In a statement to The Associated Press last week, Steven Hart described Pruitt is a “casual friend” from Oklahoma with whom he had only occasional contact.Records show the powerhouse lobbying firm where Hart serves as chairman and CEO, Williams and Jensen PLLC, represents companies that include Exxon Mobil and Cheniere Energy Inc.In December, Pruitt and members of his staff spent about $40,000 in taxpayer funds to fly to Morocco to help encourage the North African kingdom to import liquefied natural gas from the United States. Cheniere is currently the only exporter of liquefied natural gas from the continental United States.The firm also represents OGE Energy Corp., an electricity company serving Oklahoma and Arkansas.Copies of Pruitt’s daily calendar obtained by the AP through a public records request show that Pruitt meet in his EPA office with two top OGE executives and a registered lobbyist from Hart’s firm in March 2017, when he was living at the condo.In October, EPA announced it would rewrite the Clean Power Plan, an Obama-era regulation that sought to limit planet-warming carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants like those operated by OGE, which paid Hart’s firm $400,000 in lobbying fees in 2017.___Follow Associated Press environmental reporter Michael Biesecker at http://twitter.com/mbiesecklast_img read more

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At least 605 schools in Delhi likely to lose recognition

first_imgNew Delhi: At least 605 private schools in the national capital may lose their recognition if they do not deposit Rs 5 lakh environmental compensation for failing to install rainwater harvesting system mandated by the National Green Tribunal (NGT), according to Delhi government officials. The NGT had in 2017 directed all Delhi government and private schools as well as colleges to install rainwater harvesting systems in their premises within two months at their own cost. Also Read – More good air days in Delhi due to Centre’s steps: JavadekarThe green panel had stated that any institution that fails to install the rainwater harvesting system within the stipulated period shall be liable to pay environment compensation of Rs 5 lakh. “Taking cognisance of the non-compliance of the earlier directions, 605 private schools were found defaulters of either not having rainwater harvesting system installed or having a yet to be made functional system,” an official of the Directorate of Education (DoE) said. Also Read – Union min Hardeep Singh Puri, Delhi L-G lay foundation stones for various projects in DwarkaWhile the construction has not started at 331 private schools, the rain water harvesting plants are yet to be made functional in 274 private schools in the city. “The NGT had asked the DoE in February this year to direct the default schools to deposit the compensation within two weeks. Most of the schools did not comply by the order. We have issued final notices to the schools to deposit the compensation within three days. This shall be treated as final opportunity, failing which further necessary action for withdrawal of recognition of concerned schools shall be taken without any further opportunity,” the official said. The NGT had earlier directed schools and colleges to approach a committee constituted by it for inspecting the premises and granting permission to institutions for operating the system. If it was not possible to install the rainwater harvesting system, the institution should have approached the committee, it had said. The earlier The National Green Tribunal (NGT) has imposed a fine of Rs 50 crore on the Delhi government for failing to take action against polluting stainless steel pickling units in residential areas across the national capital. Similarly ,Volkswagen (VW) India has been fined Rs 500 crore by the National Green Tribunal, according to media reports. The environmental tribunal found that a “cheat device” in the company’s diesel cars damaged the environment.last_img read more

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Funding shortfall hampering relief efforts in stormbattered Philippines – UN

11 November 2009The United Nations humanitarian wing said today that relief efforts following the recent storms that battered the Philippines are being hampered by funding shortages, noting that only $26 million of the $74 million appeal launched last month has been received so far. The Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) added that the Flash Appeal is currently being revised and is expected to be finalized in the coming week.Aid agencies are reporting that funding shortfalls have limited their ability to follow through with humanitarian action plans designed to support life-saving projects and to launch early recovery efforts.The World Food Programme (WFP) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) have revised estimates of emergency and early recovery needs, taking into account new assessment data, and these additional needs will be reflected in the revised Flash Appeal.Agencies are particularly concerned about the estimated 1.7 million people still displaced or living in areas that remain under water or flooded, following the three consecutive typhoons that hit the country in September and October.Nearly 1,000 people died as a result of the storms, which affected around 9.8 million people and destroyed over 40,000 homes. Among the key concerns for aid agencies remain access to safe water, sanitation facilities and hygiene items in the relocation camps and in residential areas affected by floods. Another storm – Typhoon Mirinae – pummelled the region almost two weeks ago, bringing heavy rains, causing power outages and communication problems and raising the threat of renewed floods across the Philippines and Viet Nam. read more

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US issuing hacking alert for small planes

WASHINGTON — The Department of Homeland Security plans to issue a security alert Tuesday for small planes, warning that modern flight systems are vulnerable to hacking if someone manages to gain physical access to the aircraft.An alert from the DHS critical infrastructure computer emergency response team recommends that plane owners ensure they restrict unauthorized physical access to their aircraft until the industry develops safeguards to address the issue, which was discovered by a Boston-based cybersecurity company and reported to the federal government.Most airports have security in place to restrict unauthorized access and there is no evidence that anyone has exploited the vulnerability. But a DHS official told The Associated Press that the agency independently confirmed the security flaw with outside partners and a national research laboratory, and decided it was necessary to issue the warning.The cybersecurity firm, Rapid7, found that an attacker could potentially disrupt electronic messages transmitted across a small plane’s network, for example by attaching a small device to its wiring, that would affect aircraft systems.Engine readings, compass data, altitude and other readings “could all be manipulated to provide false measurements to the pilot,” according to the DHS alert obtained in advance by AP.The warning reflects the fact that aircraft systems are increasingly reliant on networked communications systems, much like modern cars. The auto industry has already taken steps to address similar concerns after researchers exposed vulnerabilities.The Rapid7 report focused only on small aircraft because their systems are easier for researchers to acquire. Large aircraft frequently use more complex systems and must meet additional security requirements. The DHS alert does not apply to older small planes with mechanical control systems.But Patrick Kiley, Rapid7’s lead researcher on the issue, said an attacker could exploit the vulnerability with access to a plane or by bypassing airport security.“Someone with five minutes and a set of lock picks can gain access (or) there’s easily access through the engine compartment,” Kiley said.Jeffrey Troy, president of the Aviation Information Sharing and Analysis Center, an industry organization for cybersecurity information, said there is a need to improve the security in networked operating systems but emphasized that the hack depends on bypassing physical security controls mandated by law.With access, “you have hundreds of possibilities to disrupt any system or part of an aircraft,” Troy said.The Federal Aviation Administration said in a statement that a scenario where someone has unrestricted physical access is unlikely, but the report is also “an important reminder to remain vigilant” about physical and cybersecurity aircraft procedures.Aviation cybersecurity has been an issue of growing concern around the world.In March, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s inspector general found that the FAA had “not completed a comprehensive, strategy policy framework to identify and mitigate cybersecurity risks.” The FAA agreed and said it would look to have a plan in place by the end of September.The UN’s body for aviation proposed its first strategy for securing civil aviation from hackers that’s expected to go before the General Assembly in September, said Pete Cooper, an ex-Royal Air Force fast jet pilot and cyber operations officer who advises the aviation industry.The vulnerability disclosure report is the product of nearly two years of work by Rapid7. After their researchers assessed the flaw, the company alerted DHS. Tuesday’s DHS alert recommends manufacturers review how they implement these open electronics systems known as “the CAN bus” to limit a hacker’s ability to perform such an attack.The CAN bus functions like a small plane’s central nervous system. Targeting it could allow an attacker to stealthily hijack a pilot’s instrument readings or even take control of the plane, according to the Rapid7 report obtained by The AP.“CAN bus is completely insecure,” said Chris King, a cybersecurity expert who has worked on vulnerability analysis of large-scale systems. “It was never designed to be in an adversarial environment, (so there’s) no validation” that what the system is being told to do is coming from a legitimate source.Only a few years ago, most auto manufacturers used the open CAN bus system in their cars. But after researchers publicly demonstrated how they could be hacked, auto manufacturers added on layers of security, like putting critical functions on separate networks that are harder to access externally.The disclosure highlights issues in the automotive and aviation industries about whether a software vulnerability should be treated like a safety defect — with its potential for costly manufacturer recalls and implied liability — and what responsibility manufacturers should have in ensuring their products are hardened against such attacks. The vulnerability also highlights the reality that it’s becoming increasingly difficult to separate cybersecurity from security overall.“A lot of aviation folks don’t see the overlap between information security, cybersecurity, of an aircraft, and safety,” said Beau Woods, a cyber safety innovation fellow with the Atlantic Council, a Washington think-tank . “They see them as distinct things.”The CAN bus networking scheme was developed in the 1980s and is extremely popular for use in boats, drones, spacecraft, planes and cars — all areas where there’s more noise interference and it’s advantageous to have less wiring. It’s actually increasingly used in airplanes today due to the ease and cost of implementation, Kiley said.Given that airplanes have a longer manufacturing cycle, “what we’re trying to do is get out ahead of this.”The report didn’t name the vendors Rapid7 tested, but the company alerted them over a year ago, the report states.___Follow Tami Abdollah on Twitter at https://twitter.com/latamsTami Abdollah, The Associated Press read more

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UN panel pays out 760 million for losses from Iraqs 1990 invasion

The payment will be given to 16 governments for distribution to 311 successful claimants. Governments are obligated to distribute the funds to successful claimants within six months of receiving the money.Funds to pay the awards are drawn from the UN Compensation Fund, which currently receives 25 per cent of the revenue generated from the export of Iraqi petroleum and petroleum products under the “oil-for-food” mechanism established by Security Council resolution 986 (1995) and subsequently renewed. The latest payment brings to $12,023,113,100 the overall amount of money made available to date by the UN Compensation Commission. read more

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Annan hopes to see start of Syrian troop withdrawal from Lebanon by

Mr. Annan, who sent his special envoy on the issue last week to both Lebanon and Syria, told reporters on his arrival at UN Headquarters in New York that it had been made clear to both parties that “we needed to see more progress” towards implementing Security Council resolution 1559, which called for a withdrawal of foreign troops.“The resolution does call for withdrawal of Syrian forces from Lebanon and the discussions we had with them was that we needed to see more progress, and I hope that there will be actual action and actual signs, clear signs of withdrawal, by the time I submit my next report to the Security Council, which is due in April,” he said in reply to reporters’ questions.The Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for the implementation of resolution 1559, Terje Roed-Larsen, visited Damascus and Beirut in his first visit to the region in his new capacity, delivering messages from Mr. Annan to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and Lebanese President Emile Lahoud as well as meeting with an array of senior officials of both countries.The resolution, adopted last September, calls for the withdrawal of all remaining foreign forces from Lebanon, disbanding all militias and extending Government control over the whole country.Although the resolution does not specifically mention Syria, Mr. Annan said in an initial report in October that aside from a UN peacekeeping force, the only significant foreign forces in Lebanon were Syrian. He said Syria indicated it had some 14,000 troops still inside Lebanon stationed near the border, and that it had redeployed about 3,000 other forces. Video of remarks to the press [11mins] read more

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Brock grad returns to campus to help homeless

Caleb Regier (BA ’14) eats cheese and bread that was given to him during the 5 Days for the Homeless campaign happening outside Taro Hall.Little about sleeping outside in late winter on a mattress of cardboard and concrete sounds appealing.And Caleb Regier (BA ’14) won’t tell you that it is. Still, the Brock graduate has been calling it a day on a makeshift bed in front of Taro Hall for the past several nights as part of 5 Days for the Homeless. This also marks Regier’s fifth year participating in the annual national campaign that draws attention to homelessness issues and raises money by having participants live without means for nearly a week.He fully expects to be pushed out of his comfort zone living without a proper roof over his head for five days.“It definitely wears on you,” says Regier, who graduated last June with a degree in Human Geography. “The first night is fun but it starts to wear on you. After the second and third night on the hard ground – you have cardboard but your body’s not used to it. It’s used to a soft bed.”His body is also used to set meal times. But this week, he and the nearly 20 students taking part in the event had to settle for eating only when given food.Though he stresses that participants truly don’t know what it’s like to be without, Regier isn’t unfamiliar with the plight of those dealing with housing issues. Since graduating, he has worked as a housing support worker at Start Me Up Niagara. Finding adequate affordable housing is a problem in St. Catharines, he says.“I know people who spend 100 per cent of their income on housing every month and it’s wrong,” Regier says.Making others aware of such issues is the reason why he continues to bring his sleeping bag to campus every March and take up residence outside Taro Hall. In addition to giving spare change or non-perishable food items, all of which will go to Community Care of St. Catharines and Thorold’s Housing Help, Regier hopes donors will give a few minutes of their time, too.“Even stopping to chat, talking to us (helps),” he says. “They can see us, see our signs, but once they leave, the thought leaves their mind. But when they stay and talk, it sticks with them… so the next time they see someone who’s homeless, they’ll have compassion.” read more

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Mike Trouts Teammates Dont Deserve Mike Trout

Mike Trout is once again on pace to be the greatest player ever for his age. He currently leads the American League in wins above replacement, ranks second in on-base percentage, fifth in slugging percentage, second in OPS+ and he’s even stealing bases at an elite rate. It’s a season so good, on a team so bad, that there are rumors Trout may not last the season in L.A. If the Angels trade him, they’d be getting rid of a young player unlike anyone we’ve ever seen.To pull ahead of Ty Cobb as the career leader in WAR (among position players) through age 24, Trout needs about 3 more WAR this year. (No matter which version of WAR you use.) And sure enough, FanGraphs’ projection thinks he’ll bag about 3.7 WAR before season’s end. As fluky a game as baseball can be, the one constant seems to be that Trout is the best young player we’ve ever seen.But even with a potential G.O.A.T. in their lineup, the Los Angeles Angels still haven’t been able to win many ballgames. Despite Trout’s efforts, they’re 40-52 this season — tied for last place in the American League West — and they’ve won only 53 percent of their games since Trout made his debut midway through the 2011 campaign. That’s an 86-win pace per season, which sounds OK until you consider exactly how great Trout is: an otherwise-average team who added Trout (and Trout alone) would have won roughly 88 games a year. Trout is such a gift from the baseball gods that averaging 86 wins with him is disappointing.So it’s fair to say Trout’s Angel teammates have not pulled their weight for much of his career, particularly when you consider that L.A. had baseball’s eighth-biggest payroll since 2011 — a number that Trout barely contributed to because of the way MLB underpays its young talent.We can use advanced stats to estimate the degree to which Trout has outplayed his teammates. Trout has generated 43.6 WAR since 2011; his average teammate would have generated only 9.3 WAR in the same number of opportunities. (That’s according to Baseball-Reference’s WAR, which lets us find an individualized record for any player or group of players because it also comes with a “wins above average” component, in addition to wins above replacement.) Add up those records for L.A.’s non-Trout division and calculate a winning percentage, and it comes to .468 — the equivalent of 76 wins in a full season. Scale it to Trout’s playing time, and he’s beaten his teammates by 34.3 wins in an apples-to-apples comparison.That difference between Trout and teammates is the second-biggest disparity for a player age 24 or younger since 1901: Ty CobbDET1905-1146.7.49814.132.6 Christy MathewsonNYG1901-0539.6.51716.323.3 Players must have been age 24 or younger on June 30 of the season in question. Teammate average WAR is calculated as though teammates played as much as the player they’re being compared with.Source: Baseball-Reference.com Mel OttNYG1926-3336.8.52814.322.6 Ken Griffey Jr.SEA1989-9436.9.46010.026.9 Albert PujolsSTL2001-0429.1.5419.919.3 Bob FellerCLE1936-4137.4.50214.023.4 Alex RodriguezSEA1994-0038.0.49811.626.4 Mike TroutLAA2011-1643.6.4689.334.3 Wes FerrellCLE1927-3231.3.49211.020.3 TEAMMATE AVERAGE Walter JohnsonWSH1907-1246.6.42811.235.5 Rogers HornsbySTL1915-2036.1.4004.831.3 Babe RuthBOS1914-1941.0.51016.324.7 Al KalineDET1953-5933.5.49511.222.3 Arky VaughanPIT1932-3634.3.50110.324.0 Rickey HendersonOAK1979-8328.0.4245.622.4 Mickey MantleNYY1951-5640.9.58615.125.8 Frank TananaCAL1973-7831.5.4469.621.9 PLAYERTEAMYEARSWARWIN %WARWINS ABOVE TEAMMATES Bert BlylevenMIN1970-7537.3.48314.323.0 Cesar CedenoHOU1970-7529.2.4729.619.6 Young players who outplayed their teammates the most, 1901-2016 Ted WilliamsBOS1939-4234.3.5048.226.0 Not since the days of Walter Johnson and the Washington Senators has a young star been saddled with teammates as inferior as Trout’s. And while Johnson’s Senators turned things around during his age-24 season, winning 91 games in 1912, Trout’s Angels are on pace for 73 wins, the worst record they’ve had with Trout.Under ordinary circumstances it would be unthinkable to trade a player who is tracking to be the G.O.A.T. And it probably won’t happen — trade talk is fun but often meaningless. But if Trout did move, the return would have to be immense.Let’s say, hypothetically, that the Washington Nationals wanted to add Trout at the trade deadline in two weeks. (It doesn’t have to be the Nationals, but they are a typical contender with a large incentive to load up on World Series-winning talent in the short term.) Our Doyle model of deadline-dealing is designed to tell trade partners what to do in such a circumstance. Doyle analyzes a team’s situation on July 31 — including its existing talent and playoff odds — and calculates the amount of future WAR a team should be willing to part with for one win at the trade deadline.If the Angels were smart, they wouldn’t let Trout go for anything less than two kings’ ransoms. Doyle says Trout’s talent boost1About 8.5 WAR per 162 games, according to FanGraphs. for the end of 2016 alone would be worth 22.5 WAR of future value to the Nationals. (Roughly the value of Kyle Seager’s career thus far.) Multiply that over the remaining five years of Trout’s current deal,2Including 2016. and a Trout trade might need to haul in more than double the value of an entire top-ranked farm system to be equitable. (Let’s hope the two teams who empty their farm systems avoid the Solomon method for splitting one Mike Trout.)That’s why Trout almost certainly won’t be going anywhere this season or anytime soon. And unless the Angels can somehow upgrade the rest of their roster, that means more seasons spent lamenting Trout’s fate as a future inner-circle Hall of Famer stuck with a weak supporting cast. read more

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Ohio State softball pumped up for Easton Desert Classic with some of

Then-sophomore shortstop/second baseman Maddy McIntyre throws the ball during a game against Michigan State April 24 at Buckeye Field. OSU won, 6-3.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorDespite dropping four of its five games at the FAU Kickoff Classic, the Ohio State women’s softball team is confident its record is not indicative of its potential.OSU (1-4, 0-0) is set to continue its early season tournament schedule against Cal State Northridge Friday at the Easton Desert Classic in Las Vegas. The team is also scheduled to play Long Beach State later that day. The Buckeyes are then slated to take on No. 1 Florida and No. 10 Oregon Saturday, as well as Utah Valley Sunday.Even though facing two top 10 teams in one day is a tall order, coach Kelly Kovach Schoenly said she expects the Buckeyes to rise to the occasion.“Those kids are pretty pumped up,” Schoenly said Tuesday. “I don’t worry one bit that they’ll be up for those games.”Junior shortstop/second baseman Maddy McIntyre said the team is focused on Cal State Northridge and then will take it game by game from there.“We always have the same high level of intensity,” McIntyre said Tuesday. “We take the positives and roll with what we know we’re good at.”However, one of the things it’s working on is keeping its pitchers in longer, Schoenly said.“We are working on their stamina and reducing the amount of pitches they throw earlier in the game,” Schoenly said. “If we go at batters more aggressively earlier so (the pitchers) can last longer, that would be the No. 1 way to help.”Overall, though, McIntyre said she is pleased with where the team stands.“We’re right where we want to be,” McIntyre said. “We had a lot of players stand out (last weekend) and make some big plays for us.”One of those standout players was junior outfielder Caitlin Conrad, who finished the FAU Kickoff Classic batting 7-14, including two home runs, five RBIs, three doubles and a triple.Schoenly said after Conrad spent the majority of last season batting ninth in the lineup, she has worked hard to become one of the Buckeyes’ offensive leaders and now bats third.“She is a junior now and I feel like she has done what she needed to do to be in that situation,” Schoenly said. “We like to put all of our hot hitters together and right now, she’s there.”Defensively, Schoenly said the outfield has great communication skills and aggressiveness. Conrad is joined in the outfield by sophomore Cammi Prantl and junior Taylor Watkins.“They were diving all over the place. We had a couple of assists out there and Cammi Prantl dove head first into the fence. Taylor had four diving catches, they were unreal,” Schoenly said.As the Buckeyes begin to play more games, Schoenly expects the team to improve throughout the season.“For the pitchers to throw back-to-back-to-back days, it’s something they grow into as the season goes on. I think, for our pitchers, the more they do that, the better they get at it,” Schoenly said. “I think playing that many games helps our hitters too because they see so many different pitchers and so many different types of pitches.”OSU’s game against Cal State Northridge Friday is set for 4:30 p.m., followed by a game against Long Beach State at 6:45 p.m. read more

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Black Ops 2 is free to play on Steam all weekend

first_imgOne of the advantages of offering a game for sale in downloadable form through Steam is the fact you can make it free-to-play for short periods of time. It pretty much guarantees a much larger set of gamers will at least try your game, and at the end of the free play time they may actually buy it.Activision is taking advantage of Steam’s free-to-play option this weekend by making the Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 multiplayer portion free-to-play. From now until 1pm PT on Sunday February 24, you can download and play online completely free of charge. And to sweeten the deal, if by Sunday you want to buy the game to carry on playing, Steam is offering you 33 percent off.The reason for the free promotion is due to Treyarch and Activision launching the first DLC for the game next week on February 28. Clearly they want to boost player numbers in time to purchase that extra content.The DLC pack is called Revolution and will be made available for both PC and PS3. It will offer four new multiplayer maps (Hydro, Grind, Downhill, and Mirage), a new weapon, a new Zombies map (Die Rise), and a new Zombies game mode. The new weapon is called the Peacekeeper and brings together “the mobility of a SMG with the range of an Assault Rifle.” Finally, the new Zombies game mode is called Turned and lets players fight each other in zombie form.If Black Ops 2 isn’t your thing, Steam is also offering a free play weekend for the strategy simulation game Gratuitous Space Battles. And if you like it, you can purchase the full game or the Complete Pack for 75 percent off.last_img read more

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Take the VoightGeekff Survey

first_imgWe’ve got a problem, reader. We’re starting to think that you might be a replicant – an exact duplicate of a real geek on the outside but inside a mass of wires, tubes and murderous intent.To prove you’re not, sit down, look directly into your monitor or mobile device and answer the following questions honestly. We will measure your eye-muscle and capillary reaction as you do so. Even if you don’t end up being a replicant, it’ll help us learn more about what you want to see on this site and how we can serve you better. If you are a replicant, well, somebody will be visiting you shortly.powered bylast_img read more

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Todays Weather Forecast

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppNassau, Bahamas, February 20, 2017 – A WEAK FRONTAL SYSTEM IN THE VICINITY OF THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHEAST BAHAMAS WILL CONTINUE TO MOVE SOUTHEASTWARDS AND EXIT THE AREA TODAY.NORTHWEST BAHAMAS, MOSTLY SUNNY AND MILD TODAY. FAIR AND COOL TONIGHT.  CENTRAL & SOUTHEAST BAHAMAS VARIABLE CLOUDINESS AND BREEZY WITH A FEW SCATTERED SHOWERS AND THE CHANCE OF ISOLATED THUNDERSTORMS IN THE VICINITY OF THE FRONT. MOSTLY FAIR AND MILD TONIGHT.Today’s high is forecast at 81°, the low 68°.#MagneticMediaNews The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provo Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDT Related Items:#magneticmedianews Recommended for you Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meetinglast_img read more

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ASA Applauds Senate Passage of 2012 Farm Bill

first_imgThe American Soybean Association (ASA) today applauded Senate passage of its 2012 Farm Bill.”ASA is extremely pleased with the Senate’s legislation, which would establish an effective risk management program for soybean producers that complements crop insurance, consolidate conservation programs, and have agriculture do its fair share to help address our nation’s fiscal situation by reducing government spending on agriculture by $23 billion,” said ASA President Steve Wellman, a soybean farmer from Syracuse, Neb. “We look forward to working with the House Agriculture Committee as it finalizes its version of this legislation, so the 2012 Farm Bill can be completed this year.”Wellman’s comments followed final passage of the Senate bill on a 64-35 vote. Major provisions supported by ASA include the Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) program under which revenue losses exceeding 11 percent will be partially offset at either the farm or county level. ASA also supported the consolidation of conservation programs for environmentally sensitive and working lands, reduction of Conservation Reserve Program acres from 32 to 25 million acres, and reauthorization and funding of the Market Access Program (MAP) and Foreign Market Development (FMD) program.In its review of the farm bill, the Senate considered a total of 73 amendments, including several that ASA strongly opposed and that were defeated:An amendment by Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) that would have made national check-off programs voluntary lost on a vote of 20-79.An amendment by Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) that would have reduced annual funding for MAP from $200 to $160 million lost on a vote of 30-69.An amendment by Sen. Bernard Sanders (I-Vt.) to authorize states to require mandatory labeling of biotech food products lost on a vote of 26-73.”While ASA disagrees with some of the amendments that were approved on the floor of the Senate, on the whole ASA believes the Senate’s farm bill will help farmers manage risk, conserve natural resources and develop foreign markets,” Wellman stated. “Additionally, maintaining the viability of the crop insurance program as an effective risk management tool is a top priority for ASA and soybean farmers. ASA will continue to work with the Senate and House Agriculture Committees to ensure that the viability of the crop insurance program as a risk management tool is not weakened.”Wellman concluded, “ASA thanks Senate Agriculture Committee Chair Debbie Stabenow and Ranking Member Pat Roberts for their leadership in guiding the farm bill through the Senate. We urge the House to move forward so the 2012 Farm Bill process can be completed before current program authorities expire at the end of September.”ASA represents all U.S. soybean farmers on domestic and international issues of importance to the soybean industry. ASA’s advocacy efforts are made possible through the voluntary membership in ASA by more than 21,000 farmers in 31 states where soybeans are grown.###For more information contact:Steve Wellman, ASA President, 402-269-7024, wellmanfarms@sbllcweb.comCassandra Langley, ASA Communications Coordinator, 314-576-1770, clangley@soy.orglast_img read more

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31 of Canadian employers plan to invest more in health and wellbeing

first_imgJust under a third (31%) of employer respondents in Canada intend to invest more in employee wellbeing and health education over the next year, according to research by healthcare organisation Sanofi.The 2017 Sanofi Canada healthcare survey, which surveyed 1,500 adults in Canada who are the primary holders of employee health benefit plans and 461 Canadian employers that sponsor health benefit plans, also found that half (51%) of employer respondents offer specific wellbeing programmes or policies, such as on-site flu injections or flexible working.The research also found:Almost two-thirds (64%) of employer respondents believe their corporate culture encourages wellness.53% of employee respondents feel that their current work environment and culture encourages wellbeing.50% of employee respondents agree that their employer helps staff to manage stress effectively.More than one-fifth (22%) of employee respondents believe that the workplace has a negative impact on their ability to manage stress, 16% feel the workplace negatively impacts sleep, and 9% think it has an adverse effect on healthy eating.31% of employee respondents report feeling physically ill over the last year because of workplace stress.Almost half (49%) of employee respondents find it increasingly difficult to balance work and life responsibilities.31% of employer respondents offer health spending accounts, which provide staff with a set allowance to put towards health-related services and products.77% of employee respondents have a traditional health plan with a defined level of coverage, and 54% would prefer to have a flexible plan that allows them to choose the type and level of coverage.Niven Al-Khoury, president at Sanofi Canada, said: “We have witnessed major changes in the Canadian workplace over the past 20 years, but the value that employees place in their health benefit plans has remained constant. We all share in a vision to improve the health and productivity of the Canadian workforce, which, in turn, helps ensure the sustainability of our healthcare system.”last_img read more

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CIO Magazine Goes DigitalOnly

first_img IDG Enterprise closed its U.S. print editions of Computerworld and CSO for similar reasons in June 2014. The group also publishes InfoWorld and Network World, among others. The trend isn’t universal, though. Some smaller publishers in the market, such as BZ Media, still maintain print in their portfolio. “We follow our audiences, this is the natural progression of senior-level IT decision makers with where they prefer to consume their content—and that’s online, mobile and events,” says IDG Communications CMO Josh London. “And if you look at the growth through the channels they’re using, our advertisers increasingly want to market to those channels.” CIO is the last print holdout among IDG Enterprise’s tech brands, but the U.S. edition of the title will be going all digital as of its November issue, Folio: has learned. With the print title gone, the division’s five former magazine brands are now all digital. The transition, particularly in the tech market, should come as no surprise. Technology publishers were among the first to shutter print magazines to focus resources on digital and live events. And IDG has been converting its brands to all-digital for several years now. London says monthly uniques to CIO.com, which average 1.8 million, have grown 70 percent in the last year. CIO, a controlled circulation title, has about 140,000 print subscribers who will automatically be added to the digital edition subscriber list. Starting in January, the digital edition will be published monthly, two more issues than the former print frequency.last_img read more

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Alaska News Nightly Wednesday April 3 2019

first_imgStories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via email, podcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @AKPublicNews VAWA bill would create limited ‘Indian Country’ for 5 Alaska tribesAndrew Kitchenman, KTOO – JuneauThe Violence Against Women Act renewal bill would allow up to five Alaska tribes territorial jurisdiction in their villages to prosecute domestic abuse and other crimes, whether the accused is a tribal member or not.Jurors hear rap song recorded by suspected police shooterAssociated PressThe judge in the trial of an Alaska man charged with killing a police officer has allowed jurors to hear a rap song recorded by the suspect in jail.Alaska public defender says he plans to resignAssociated PressAlaska’s longtime public defender says he’ll resign as soon as a replacement is appointed.The night a Guardian Flight vanished, the Coast Guard’s nearest helicopters couldn’t flyJacob Resneck, CoastAlaska – JuneauWhen a Guardian Flight air ambulance plane inexplicably vanished Jan. 29 over Frederick Sound, mechanical failures grounded the nearest Coast Guard helicopters at Air Station Sitka.Lawmakers amend budget to stop reimbursing municipalities for school bond debtAndrew Kitchenman, KTOO – JuneauThe vote brings the House budget back into agreement with Gov. Mike Dunleavy on the issue. If the amendment makes it into the final budget, it would shift roughly $100 million in spending from the state to municipalities.Aboard Alaska’s endangered ferries, passengers fear a “giant step back in time”Nathaniel Herz, Alaska’s Energy Desk – AnchorageStep onboard the MV LeConte, where a single trip last week showed how Southeast Alaska residents have knit the state’s ferries into their lives – and how they would adapt if the ships stopped running, and Gov. Mike Dunleavy is proposing.At Iliamna Lake hearings, residents speak out on Pebble MineIsabelle Ross, KDLG – DillinghamThe U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is holding a series of public hearings on the proposed Pebble Mine’s draft environmental review. Three were held in communities on Iliamna Lake. That region – and the people who live there – would be among the most immediately impacted by the project.Anchorage keeps liberal-leaning Assembly, says no to alcohol tax in initial municipal resultsZachariah Hughes, Alaska Public Media – AnchorageIn unofficial results for Tuesday’s Municipal election in Anchorage, two Anchorage Assembly members handily won reelection, while three new faces will join the local municipal body.last_img read more

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Britain escorts Russian ship near national waters

first_imgRoyal Navy frigate HMS St Albans escorting Russian warship Admiral Gorshkov as it passes close to UK territorial waters through the North Sea. Photo: ReutersA British ship escorted a Russian vessel as it passed near UK territorial waters over Christmas, Britain’s defence ministry said on Tuesday, adding that Russian naval activity near Britain had increased in the holiday period.The frigate HMS St Albans departed on Dec. 23 to track the new Russian warship Admiral Gorshkov as it moved through the North Sea. The Royal Navy vessel monitored the Russian ship over Christmas and will return to dock in Portsmouth later on Tuesday.UK defence minister Gavin Williamson said in a statement after the incident that he would “not hesitate in defending our waters or tolerate any form of aggression”.Relations between Britain and Russia are strained, and UK foreign minister Boris Johnson said there was “abundant evidence” of Moscow meddling in foreign elections during a trip to Russia last week. His counterpart Sergei Lavrov said there was no proof for Johnson’s claim.While Johnson said he wants to normalise relations with Russia, Moscow blames London for the poor state of relations between the countries.Britain’s defence ministry said another ship, HMS Tyne, was called to escort a Russian intelligence-gathering ship through the North Sea and the English Channel on Christmas Eve. A helicopter was subsequently dispatched to monitor two other Russian vessels.last_img read more

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Success Of Oil And Gas Recovery Depends On Several Factors

first_img 00:00 /01:11 Share Florian MartinDeloitte’s John England, Ray Ballotta, Andrew Slaughter and Paul Campbell, from left, discuss the recovering oil and gas industry.Experts agree that 2017 is a recovery year for the oil and gas industry.At $53 a barrel, the price of West Texas Intermediate crude oil is now double of what it was one year ago, when the downturn hit its low point.How fast production will go back up depends on several factors, according to John England, Deloitte’s U.S. oil and gas sector leader.“There’s been a lot of equipment that’s been pulled off the market,” he said. “This is fracking equipment, pressure pumping equipment and in many cases it’s been cold-stacked and it’s not going to go back to work easily any time soon.”Another question is whether oil companies will be able to bring the lost talent back after the many layoffs in the past two years.The industry did a great job keeping expenses low and still producing during the downturn, England said.“But the question is, can we keep those costs down?” he said. “The history of this industry is that we haven’t, but I think there’s a belief that some things are different this time.”Other factors include investment in new technology and world affairs.And then there’s the expectation of reduced regulations under the new Trump administration. While that’s positive for the industry, the uncertainty this is creating right now is not helpful. “And the companies we tend to see that are successful in this environment are the ones that can go through that war gaming exercise to say, if these rules change, how will we react?” Paul Campbell, who leads Deloitte’s regulatory branch, said.This happens whenever there’s a change of leadership that is going in a different direction, he said.Florian MartinDeloitte’s Houston offices in the Heritage Plaza building downtown. Listen X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more

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first_imgFind more news and videos from AAPM. Recent Videos View all 606 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Conference Coverage View all 396 items Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Videos | March 22, 2011 Seeing Deeper Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Technology Reports View all 9 items Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Women’s Health View all 62 items Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Information Technology View all 220 items Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF Systemlast_img read more

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