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3 Ways to Build Your IT Skills as Data Centers Modernize

first_imgTechnology marches on. And so must we.As IT professionals, we need to be agile: constantly transforming skills to adapt, if not anticipating, the constantly changing business and technology landscape.Today, that means you need to learn new skills along with data center infrastructure transformation and digital transformation of businesses.  These modernization trends are clear:Instead of integrating separate compute, storage and network components themselves, more and more IT teams are buying pre-engineered/pre-manufactured converged systems.Instead of relying on traditional brick-and-motor business models (run on traditional CRM, ERP and financial applications), more businesses are turning to service-oriented business models run on social, mobile and big data applications.This white paper from the Enterprise Management Associates analyst group outlines IT/business transformation trends and includes in-depth interviews with two enterprises who successfully transformed.Here are three important use cases that you need to keep in mind as you tune up your skills to ride this wave along with IT and business.Use Case 1: Must Modernize Data Center to Support Core Business AppsProblem: Infrastructure supporting core business applications (SAP, Oracle, Microsoft, vertical industry-specific suites) is aging.  The data center needs a refresh and more capacity, but space, support staff and budget for OPEX are limited.Solution: Converged infrastructure systems, pre-engineered and manufactured with the latest technologies (storage arrays, compute blades, network and hybrid cloud for “anything as a service”) give you the latest technologies. This delivers the performance, headroom and resiliency that mission critical applications require, while requiring less hand-holding (i.e., OPEX) and a smaller footprint.Skill Transformation: Less effort to “keep the lights on” frees you to become more consultative with customers and more agile, so you can upgrade and deploy new services faster – be recognized for it.Use Case 2: Must Scale-out the Data Center for Digital Business TransformationProblem: Need to provide infrastructure and environments for “third platform applications”  that deliver revenue-generating services via web, social media and mobile devices.Solution: Rackscale hyper-converged systems that start small, scale-out massively, and support native hybrid cloud platforms for rapid application development and deployment.Skill Transformation: Master the art of  the software-defined data center, so you’re not left behind the next phase on infrastructure evolution and are recognized for helping drive your business to its next reincarnation.Use Case 3: Must Assure Infrastructure Meets Stringent Operating Level and Security ObjectivesProblem: Revenue, customer satisfaction and loyalty and IT’s reputation depend on round-the-clock application availability and no service degradations. Traditional siloed IT processes are too slow when new capacity needs to be reallocated, when security bugs strike without warning and when you need to upgrade firmware to address a technical issue.Solution: Converged infrastructure management tools with cross-silo intelligence, automation and visualization.Skill Transformation: Learn how to manage, support and sustain compute, storage and network resources as a single system and multiple systems as a unified pool of resources. This will make you a more valuable player who is collaborative across silos, proactive and solves problems faster.last_img read more

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Dell News at CES 2019

first_imgMissed Dell’s press conference? Watch the full replay below and check out other awesome videos from the event.<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>Dell NewsFriday, January 4, 2019New Business AttitudeSunday, January 6, 2019Alienware Debuts its Thinnest and Lightest 17” notebook with Alienware m17 and Earns a “2019 CES Innovation Award” In GamingMonday, January 7, 2019The #DellExperience at CES 2019Tuesday, January 8, 2019Dell Delivers Purposeful PC and Software Innovations for a Seamless, Intuitive ExperienceDell and Alienware Set a New Bar for Excellence with redesigned PC Gaming portfolio, Alienware Design, and esports PartnershipsXPS is Finally Perfect. Smile!LAS VEGAS, NV – JANUARY 08: Actress and director, Aisha Tyler, helps Dell kick off CES 2019 at their press conference unveiling their latest line-up of award winning gaming and PC innovations. #DellExperience. (Photo by Jerod Harris/Getty Images for Dell)Wednesday, January 9, 2019Dell hits 2020 Circular Milestones, Recycles 2 Billion Pounds of Electronics.Event PhotosDell Schedule of Events:Visit the Dell Experience: Check out products and meet with Dell representativesWHENJanuary 8th 11:30 a.m. PT – 2:00 p.m. PT for press / 2:00 p.m. PT – 5:00 p.m. PT for public.January 9th 10:00 a.m. PT – 5:00 p.m. PTJanuary 10th 10:00 a.m. PT – 5:00 p.m. PTWHERE: Sugarcane Raw Bar & Grill, Venetian Hotel & CasinoDell’s CES Press Conference:Immersive computing. Exquisite design. Eliminating boundaries. Hear the inspiration behind Dell’s latest technology from designers, partner and celebrity guest speakers. Attendance is open to all CES badge holders so RSVP now!WHEN: January 8th 10:00 a.m. PT -11:30 a.m. PT; Doors Open at 9:30 a.m. PTWHERE: Sands Showroom at The VenetianMedia contact: dellces2019@axicom.com Alienware CES Celebration: Join us for a night of gaming, giveaways, music, and a recap of our CES announcements! RSVP now.WHEN: January 8th 9:00 p.m. PT- 12:00 a.m. PTWHERE: Brooklynn Bowl Welcome to the Dell CES 2019 News Site!Here you will find all the Dell happenings at CES 2019, including information about the press conference, product launches and business news. #DellExperience #CES2019Quick Links:Product Press Materials and ImagesDell Sociallast_img read more

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Sheriff: Hit men hired by accused rapist killed wrong women

first_imgMONTEGUT, La. (AP) — Authorities said a Louisiana man facing rape charges tried to have his accuser killed, but hit men instead ended up killing the sister of the man who hired them, as well as her neighbor. The Terrebonne Parish Sheriff’s Office said Monday that neither Hope Nettleton nor Brittany Cormier was the person that two hit men had been hired to kill on Jan. 13. Authorities on Friday arrested Andrew Eskine, Dalvin Wilson and Beaux Cormier on charges of first-degree murder. Prosecutors said the death penalty was “on the table.” It wasn’t known if they had lawyers.last_img read more

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Dean, wife bike from Ariz. to ND for cause

first_imgCollege of Science Dean Gregory Crawford and his wife Renate have encountered 42 flat tires and a few tarantulas while biking 2,200 across the country.The couple is raising money to represent the newly-enhanced relationship between Notre Dame and the Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation, which united to support research dedicated to finding a cure for Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease, according to the Crawfords’ blog documenting their experience.The couple will arrive at Main Circle on Monday between noon and 1:30 p.m.In their blog, the Craw-fords wrote that they are making the 2,200-mile challenge to raise awareness about NPC and the new partnership as well as to raise funds.This partnership will also be a model for future research projects of Notre Dame’s Center for Rare and Neglected Diseases.The Parseghian Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to funding medical research projects to find  treatments and a cure for NPC, a deadly neurodegenerative disease.Since they began their journey on July 24 in Tuscon, Ariz., Crawford said they have biked in six states and have overcome many challenges. On their longest travel day, the couple rode 120 miles through Texas.“By far, [the most rewarding part of the trip] has been meeting the Notre Dame family along the way,” Crawford said.Cindy and Mike Parseghian, both 1977 graduates of Notre Dame, established the foundation in 1994 because of the diagnosis of NPC for three of their four children.“It has been wonderful working with Cindy and Mike Parseghian, Coach Ara and the Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation,” he said. “They turned their hardship into hope for so many others.”The foundation currently funds 25 labs researching NPC, according to Notre Dame’s College of Science website. It has been a sponsor of medical breakthroughs including the identification of the gene responsible for NPC1, and the discovery of cholesterol pathway that occurs in all humans.After already biking over 2,000 miles, the Crawfords have hit the home stretch. Crawford said they have confidence in achieving the 2,200-mile goal.“We will succeed because of our common vision and direction, our unity of purpose, our sense of camaraderie and cooperation and our spirit of commitment to the values and vocation that have always guided the College of Science,” the Crawfords wrote in the blog.last_img read more

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Week calls attention to disorders

first_imgEating disorders, such as bulimia and anorexia, are increasingly common in the United States, but they remain a highly stigmatized topic many feel uncomfortable addressing. National Eating Disorder Awareness Week, which takes place this week, hopes to change this trend. The event attempts to foster recognition of eating disorders not as choices but as serious, life-threatening illnesses, according to a press release on the event’s website. As coordinator of Eating Disorder Services at Notre Dame, staff clinician Valerie Staples said many students struggle with how they eat and how they view their bodies. “Eating concerns and body image concerns are very prevalent on this campus,” she said. “Last year, of students who came here to the counseling center, 9.8 percent reported eating concerns.” Staples said the frequency of disordered eating among Notre Dame students can be attributed to the University’s intensely competitive atmosphere. “We have a culture on our campus of ‘always do better, always improve,’” she said. “This reinforces people thinking about how they look in comparison to somebody else, about how much they eat and exercise in comparison to somebody else.” Staples also said society and media play a role in creating pressures leading to eating disorders. “It’s hard to pick up a magazine or watch any sort of a commercial nowadays that isn’t encouraging us to lose weight or to re-shape our bodies in some way, saying that we’ll be more happy or successful if we do,” she said. “While making physical improvements isn’t a bad thing, at what point do we need to appreciate other qualities in ourselves?” Staples said eating disorders are underreported at Notre Dame not only because many students are afraid or embarrassed to ask for help, but also because many don’t realize they have a problem. “For many individuals, they simply don’t recognize that what they’re doing is destructive and unhealthy,” Staples said. “Weight loss is considered a good thing, and so they think ‘the more the better.’” Recognizing many of the primary misconceptions surrounding eating disorders, Staples said there is harm in labeling eating disorders as a woman’s problem. “Certainly there are a greater percentage of women who are affected by eating disorders, but it would be a very narrow perspective to think about this as only a women’s issue,” she said. “If we look at eating disorders this way, we continue to make it more challenging for men to recognize its impact in their lives and to seek treatment.” Staples said if you know somebody struggling with an eating disorder, the most important step in helping them is simply saying something to them. “It’s very important that you let the person know that you’re concerned,” she said. “It may not necessarily be an easy conversation to have, but until the person recognizes that their problem is affecting other people they may continue to be comfortable with it.” Ultimately, Staples said all members of the Notre Dame community have a responsibility to change the atmosphere on campus by taking the eating struggles of others into consideration in language and actions. “As a community we should be mindful of our language in terms of how much we talk about weight, calories, exercise,” she said. “We all have a responsibility to make changes in our culture in that way.”last_img read more

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Design students bridge gaps

first_imgOver fall break, 14 design students attempted to bridge the gap between Notre Dame and the South Bend community through a design blitz led by John Bielenberg, founder of the design service program Project M. Bielenberg is a pioneer of the “thinking wrong” approach to design, which involves drawing inspiration for projects in unconventional ways, and Project M implements design projects conceived through this method to address social problems. Senior industrial design major Alisa Rantanen said students followed the thinking wrong approach in conceiving of their projects, starting with brainstorming words. “It started with brainstorming and mind-mapping random words, not even design related,” Rantanen said. “Each group was given a prompt. So my group was given ‘Rick James’ and ‘chalk,’ and all in one day we were told, ‘Go make a project based on that.’” Three different projects emerged from the brainstorming session: chalk talk, PROJECTiiON and IN South Bend. Rantanen said her group worked on chalk talk and painted a chalkboard wall in downtown South Bend so people could share their thoughts with the community. “It’s a way to give them a voice where otherwise many people wouldn’t be heard,” she said. “The next phase is to bring it to Notre Dame.” The prompts on the wall say “I am,” “I think,” “I feel” and “I dream,” Rantanen said. Industrial design graduate student Kevin Melchiorri said PROJECTiiON stands for “Projecting Interactive Images On Neighborhoods.” The project’s goal is to project meaningful images on visible buildings in downtown South Bend at night, he said. “This process creates a beacon that invites, unites and empowers viewers through selected content,” Melchiorri said. PROJECTiiON also works with chalk talk to project images of the chalk wall, Melchiorri said. “We are currently collaborating with chalk talk and have plans to create a series of projects in the future that involve video games, movies, lighting, restaurant and local business promotion and kinetic energy from the audience’s physical participation,” he said. IN South Bend is an initiative to get a trolley to run from Main Circle to downtown South Bend to encourage more students to visit. Junior graphic design major Jeff McLean said the idea for the project was based on the phrase “insane clown posse struggle bus.” “We used this to drive our concepts around creating an atmosphere of fun, new experiences and excitement around student trips downtown,” McLean said. “An important component of doing this effectively was to make going downtown a tangibly branded experience for students.” To promote the project, McLean said his group built a “bus” out of PVC pipe and tied balloons to it. They filmed themselves traveling downtown, leaving a balloon at each place they stopped. The group then posted the video online and asked viewers to sign a petition to make the bus a reality, he said. Senior industrial design major Bobby Reichle, a part of the group that developed IN South Bend, said he hopes the project will draw more students downtown because the area has a lot to offer. “For me, my favorite place in South Bend is the Main Street Coffee House, and no one knows it exists,” Reichle said. “I want people to move beyond the cookie-cutter stores of Eddy Street and actually see the local character of downtown South Bend. There is actually some worthwhile stuff there.” Senior industrial design major Airi Kobayashi said the design blitz forced the students to interact with South Bend in a new way and to talk to community members to learn more about the area. “We realized how much South Bend has more to offer than we thought there was and how much of a disconnect there was from the Notre Dame community to South Bend,” Kobayashi said. The blitz’s format and short time limit also enabled the students to put design skills they learned in the classroom to practical use, Rantanen said. “I knew this was going to be a super-creative, super-intense process, and I wanted to get … the messier side of actually making things real,” she said. Rantanen said seeing her project come alive was one of the best parts of the blitz. “This was a great opportunity to do something and see the direct impact,” she said. “Our chalk wall – less than 24 hours later, people had written all over it, so it was really rewarding to have that immediate impact.” Contact Tori Roeck at vroeck@nd.edulast_img read more

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Faculty studies concussions

first_imgBaraka Bouts and Bengal Bouts may be two of the most anticipated annual athletic events at Notre Dame, but for computer science faculty members Dr. Christian Poellabauer and Dr. Patrick Flynn, the fights offered a chance to put two years’ worth of concussion diagnostics research to the test. “Impacted brain function can cause slurred speech,” Poellabauer said. “Specifically, we isolate vowels in the words spoken by the athlete into a microphone and look at the different frequencies that are presented in [his] speech and see how they deviate from the norm.” The program analyzes a boxer’s voice recording after his or her match and compares it to a baseline vocal sample recorded during a pre-fight physical examination, Poellabauer said. The algorithm then “spits out” a score representing the possibility of a concussion. “If the score is above a certain threshold, then we would refer the athlete to a doctor for examination,” Poellabauer said. For Bengal and Baraka Bouts, boxers could opt into the test, which required them to speak certain words into an iPad microphone, Poellabauer said.  “We looked just a little deeper into the actual composition of the voice to see if there’s any kind of … change in the frequencies or the amplitudes,” she said. “We were focusing on the vowels because they’re the easiest to examine, to find changes. And luckily we were able to find such changes.” Poellabauer and Flynn said these indicators of a potential concussion include distorted vowels, hypernasality and imprecise consonants, but they agreed the biggest challenge for the team is collecting enough data to support effective analysis. “It turns out that a boxing tournament is almost ideal in terms of data collection,” Flynn said. “We don’t want anyone to get concussed, but they’re guaranteed to happen in a large-scale boxing tournament.” The program does not guarantee an accurate final diagnosis of potential concussions, nor is it meant to do so, Flynn said. “The idea is to make this a rapid screening tool that basically anyone can perform, and it’s intended to characterize the risk,” Flynn said. “It’s not diagnosing per se, but it is providing this score that if it has any kind of elevated level, you would probably suggest to a coach that a follow-up medical visit is necessary.” The application has the potential to be applied toward other types of brain damage, including diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, Flynn said. There are also plans to team with the Cleveland Clinic to expand the test’s use to other sports and potentially prepare it for the commercial market. “The goal of the app is to be fairly conservative,” Flynn said. “Any commercial or widely-used version of the app would need to guard against false negatives.” The project began nearly two years ago in the fall of 2011 when Poellabauer and his team, which includes additional faculty and students, contacted University physician James Moriarty about applying their diagnostic test to athletes in danger of concussions. “We actually had some students doing a class project on using tablets for detecting brain injuries,” Poellabauer said. “After that project was over, we had the idea of trying to reach out to Dr. Moriarty … to see if we could use such a test on campus, and he offered for us to test for the boxing competitions.” With the support of Notre Dame and the Cleveland Clinic, Poellabauer and Flynn said they hope the app will be more widely tested. “It’s very preliminary, but there’s definitely interest in our work,” Flynn said.last_img read more

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Greenpeace director speaks on drilling

first_imgOn Sunday, Feb. 22, Saint Mary’s sophomore and student government association (SGA) sustainability chair, Mikhala Kaseweter, held a viewing to watch Greenpeace USA executive director Annie Leonard host a live streaming party. During the live stream, Leonard expanded upon reasons why we must prevent Shell from drilling in the Arctic and how we can stop this from happening.Caitlyn Jordan According to their website, Greenpeace USA is the leading independent campaigning organization that uses peaceful protest and creative communication to expose global environmental problems and to promote solutions that are essential to a green and peaceful future.Leonard kicked off the live stream by describing her experience on her voyage to the Arctic and detailing the unspeakable beauty and complex ecosystem of the vast region.“Just from the natural perspective, it is a gorgeous place,” Leonard said. “It is the air conditioner of the planet. The melting of the ice caps not only threatens habitats and releases the major fossil fuel, methane, into the atmosphere, but it also opens up space for oil companies to drill.”The major oil company, Shell, plans on obtaining permission from the U.S. Department of the Interior and the Obama Administration to begin drilling for oil in the Arctic this summer. However, Leonard explained that the stakes for this are extremely high.“The Arctic is treacherous and dangerous place in general, let alone a difficult place to drill for oil,” she said. “The government has estimated that there will be a 75 percent chance of an oil spill. The effects of the British Petroleum oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico would be minuscule compared to an oil spill in the Arctic.”Leonard also brings to attention that Shell has attempted drilling in the Arctic before, referring to “The New York Times” article published on Dec. 30, “The Wreck of the Kulluk.” According to Leonard, the article emphasizes that The Kulluk, Shell’s previous oil rig, could not handle the arctic conditions and ran aground, putting the entire crew and the surrounding ecosystem in imminent danger.“I always get asked, ‘What can we do to stop the drilling?’ The reality is that science and economics are on our side,” Leonard said. “It is looking like the government is going to give Shell the green light to drill. We must turn the volume up on this issue.”Leonard continued her live stream by noting that drilling in the Arctic is a worldwide issue, sharing that her colleagues in Germany have noticed that every single politician in Germany agrees that climate change is one of the most crucial issues of today’s world. For example, in October of 2014 in Copenhagen, Denmark, the 40th session of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was held, she said. One result of this session was an agreement among nations that the Earth’s climate cannot raise more than 2 degrees Celsius or there will be drastic consequences. According to the IPCC, among the many circumstances that must be abided to achieve this, one is that the Arctic must remain untouched by fossil fuel companies, she said.“People ask me if it’s hard [to be an activist]. I say it would be hard not to — to just sit by and not do anything to save the planet,” Leonard said. “We can never compete with Shell on the money front, but we have more people. Our next move is happening from March 16-20, and we are aiming to get over 10,000 people calling the White House. We want you all to call the White House. We are going to bombard the White House with calls to save the Arctic.”At the end of the viewing, Leonard held a question and answer session.Upon being asked by Kaseweter, who is also a member of Greenpeace USA, whether other organizations have united to help protect the Arctic, Leonard responded that others are indeed working towards this goal.“…however, Greenpeace does have some unique tools that they bring to the table — we actually own ships we bring into the arctic,” she said.Kaseweter said it is important to recognize the issues that the earth faces.“I care about the environment and I believe in civil obedience even in this Democratic government today,” Kaseweter said.Kaseweter said she put this viewing together because it was “Annie Leonard and GreenPeace coming together, my two loves. And I also cannot wait to call the White House.” According to Greenpeace’s website, the very latest news on the subject is that the Obama Administration has proposed ideas to expand the protections of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge; however, the U.S. Department of Interior has also proposed its new drilling plan for 2017-2022, which includes Arctic drilling. Tags: Ann Leonard, Climate change, drilling in the arctic, Greenpeace, Greenpeace USA, Mikhala Kaseweter, news, obama administration, Shell, U.S. department of interiorlast_img read more

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Student government association implements sustainable practices at Saint Mary’s

first_imgWhen Saint Mary’s student body president and vice president Bailey Oppman and Lydia Lorenc took office, they wanted to promote sustainability on campus. To achieve this goal, they named junior Emily Harrast and sophomore Kassidy Jungles as the chairs for sustainability under Student Government Association (SGA).While Oppman and Lorenc stressed sustainability, the majority of initiatives fall under the sustainability chairs, Harrast said in an email.“Kassidy and I worked on our own goals for the year, but when it came to things we did not have experience with, [Oppman and Lorenc] were very helpful,” she said. “They helped us figure out our budget for the year, as well as helping us communicate our goals with [College President Jan Cervelli] and other staff.”The chairs’ main goal for this semester was fundraising, Harrast said.“[We] wanted to raise money to buy hand dryers for the student center bathrooms,” Harrast said. “We spent this past semester designing a good product that we felt everyone would enjoy — but also subtly supports sustainability — and selling it to raise the money we needed to support our efforts. We achieved our goal of selling 100 shirts, and we hope to implement the new hand dryers as soon as possible.”Cervelli has stressed sustainability since her inauguration last school year. Harrast said SGA met with Cervelli to discuss goals and hear any ideas she may have for SGA.“Together, we discussed the sustainable practices already in place, which there are a fair number of, and then talked about our goal of getting hand dryers in the student center,” Harrast said.The College has also had an active composting program during this semester, although Harrast said she cannot take credit for that initiative.“While [the composting program] was included in our goals early on, it was started by [senior] Katie Frego and the composting club,” she said. “We work some with the club, but this program is completely run by the club members.”Harrast said she and Jungles hope to continue promoting knowledge next semester.“Our goals … are to spread more information about sustainable things the average Saint Mary’s student can do,” Harrast said. “We hope to do this not only using posters and social media, but also with some fun event we are planning, specifically Earth Day.”Harrast said she believes it is important not only to strive for a more sustainable life, but also to incorporate that principle into SGA specifically.“Having chairs for sustainability stresses how important this topic really is,” she said. “[It] reminds students that we need to constantly think about whether or not actions are sustainable and what we need to do to make them more sustainable.”Tags: 2017 student government, composting, Student Government Association, Student Government Insider 2017, sustainabilitylast_img read more

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